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Op Guava arrests in Stoke, Birmingham, Cardiff & London
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Mark Gobell
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Telegraph

London terror bomb plot: the four terrorists

Four men pleaded guilty to plotting a Christmas bomb attack on the London Stock Exchange and causing a 'Mumbai-style' atrocity. Here are their profiles:

5:26PM GMT 01 Feb 2012

Mohammed Chowdhury

Chowdhury, described as the 'lynchpin' of the terrorist plot, nicknamed JMB by his co-defendants - short for banned terrorist group Jammat-ul Mujahideen Bangladesh, was told he faced a sentence of 13 and a half years, plus a five year extended licence period for preparing to commit an act of terroism.

A handwritten target list containing the names and addresses of Boris Johnson, two rabbis and details about the American Embassy and the letters 'LXC' (the London Stock Exchange) were found in his bedroom in his housing association flat in the shadow of Canary Wharf.

With expensive cars parked in the surrounding streets, Chowdhury’s modest flat on the Isle of Dogs was modern but small compared to some of the more luxurious flats of the young bankers nearby.

Neighbours would see him cycling around the area, wearing traditional clothing, but say he would not stop to chat.

The flat next door is now boarded up after police broke in to deal with a domestic attack.

Shah Rahman

A short distance across East London, Shah Rahman, 28, lived in a terraced house not far from the ground of West Ham United football club.

The family at the house in St Bernard’s Road has now moved to the North of England and told neighbours after the arrests that Rahman was a “cousin’s friend” who had been renting a room.

They used to see him driving a blue car, wearing a prayer cap and traditional clothing and carrying a brief case.

The house was occupied by a man, his wife and their young daughter who used to work at a nearby Tesco store and had orginally come from Dhaka in Bangladesh.

He was observed joining Chowdhury on a tour of central London tourist sites for six hours between 3.30pm and 9.30pm on November 28 2010. They were seen looking at Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, the London Eye, Blackfriars Bridge and the Church of Scientology on Queen Victoria Street.

Abdul Miah

Abdul Miah, 25, and the leader of the Cardiff gang had a string of previous convictions, including one for possession of an offensive weapon, and others for possession of cannabis, intimidating a witness and false imprisonment. He has a young wife and a baby born in April 2011.

One neighbour in Cardiff said Miah went to prison as a petty criminal and came out expressing extreme views.

He was among a group that handed out leaflets at the local Jalalia mosque encouraging people not to vote in the general election, saying it was "unmuslim".

Muslims leaders said they had stopped the group from holding meetings in mosques and told them to go elsewhere. Among those who had preached to them was the radical Abu Izzadeen, infamous for barracking then Home Secretary John Reid.

In Ninian Park Road in Cardiff, Miah’s home is dwarfed at one end by the looming bulk of the Milennium Stadium and backs onto the busy goods yards and main line to the west of Cardiff central station.

It is a busy thoroughfare which carries traffic out towards the picturesque Vale of Glamorgan and even to the south the green hills and woods which surround Michaelston are clearly visible.

But Ninian Park Road itself is two long rows of terraced homes which have clearly seen better days. The street corners are strewn with rubbish bags and there is graffiti on several run down shops.

The area would once have been a proud, white, working class suburb but with the multicultural changes for which Cardiff, a once proud dock, is famous it has become home to a large Somali, Indian and Bangladeshi population.

Miah’s parents-in-law still live in the street and one neighbour said: “They’re quiet enough and keep themselves to themselves. They never speak to you and even if you acknowledge them they just tend to walk on by with their head down.

"The women are covered from head to toe with only their eyes showing but they never make eye contact.

“Sometimes there would be five or six taxi drivers congregating there in the early hours of the morning when they came off shift. There’s nothing wrong with that but there was a lot of other comings and goings too.

There were often big arguments and fights and the police had to be called. One morning about 5am I looked out after hearing a big van screech to a halt.

"About four blokes jumped out all holding wooden clubs or staircase spindles and they were clearly out to settle a score. It was terrifying.

“There were lots of expensive cars too – Mercedes and BMWs and 4x4s – all got gotten gains no doubt. I just kept my head down and didn’t get involved but it really worried me.”

Gurukanth Desai

Gurukanth Desai, 30, was born in Bangladesh and has three children aged nine, six and two.

He came to Britain aged six months old and is the older brother of fellow defendant Abdul Miah.

He pleaded guilty to preparing for acts of terrorism and was observed discussing the placement of five letter bombs in the Royal Mail post before Christmas and leaving a device with a one hour timer with couriers DHL.



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Telegraph

How the MI5 watchers trapped the home-grown terrorists

IT was a plot inspired by al-Qaeda but conceived entirely on British soil.

By Duncan Gardham, Security Correspondent

9:44PM GMT 01 Feb 2012

Four young men from London and Cardiff planned bomb attacks on targets including the London Stock Exchange, Parliament, the US embassy and the Mayor of London.

Three other men from Stoke were planning a further wave of attacks once they had travelled abroad for more training. Two other men were also linked to the plots.

Yesterday all nine men, of Pakistani and Bangladeshi origin, pleaded guilty to a series of terrorist-related offences at Woolwich Crown Court.

It followed months of surveillance by MI5 officers, who had watched the men develop from fringe radicals into terrorists who posed a grave threat to national security.

Tensions in Stoke

MI5’s investigation into the London Stock Exchange bombers began with surveillance on a group of Muslim rabble rousers in Stoke-on-Trent.

By 2009, the men had become well-known in the town amid heated tensions between Muslim extremists and the Right-wing English Defence League, handing out leaflets and filming each other on mobile phones as they burned poppies.

The protests alone, however, were no longer enough. The group had become followers of Anwar al-Awlaki, a Yemeni preacher whose background living in the US and Britain had helped him gain a huge following in the West. With the publication of the slick English-language Inspire magazine in 2010, he took to inspiring others to adopt what the intelligence community call a “just do it” approach to terrorism, instead of plotting elaborate attacks.

The magazine included bomb-making instructions labelled: “How to make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom” by the “Al-Qaeda chef”.

The group in Stoke soon contacted other radicals in London and Cardiff on Paltalk, an internet messaging service. The groups found they had common ground, and decided to meet.

The Boating Lake

On Nov 7, 2010, Mohammed Chowdhury, a member of the London cell, travelled from London to Cardiff by coach on a day return ticket. He took a USB stick filled with jihadi material.

That morning Mohammed Shahjahan from Stoke picked up his friends Usman Khan and Mohibur Rahman in his red Volkswagen Golf and headed down the M6 towards Wales. They met Abdul Miah and Gurukanth Desai, brothers from Cardiff, and their friend Omar Latif at Roath Park Lake, a Victorian boating lake.

For the next three and a half hours the men were watched as they took part in prayers and talks in an area surrounded by bushes and trees. This, investigators believe, was an “introductory meeting” at which they discussed their ideology.

The London plot

A few weeks later, on Nov 28, Miah and Desai left Miah’s home in Ninian Park Road, Cardiff at about 8.20am, heading for London.

In the car they listened to a lecture by the al-Qaeda preacher, Anwar al-Awlaki, and discussed the practicalities of carrying out an explosive attack. As they passed through an area bombed in the Second World War, Desai said Muslims fought alongside Hitler who “knew the Jews were dangerous” and quoted Ayman al-Zawahiri, the leader of al-Qaeda.

In London they met Chowdhury, and were introduced to his friend, Shah Rahman. On their journey the four men discussed their ideology and plans for a terrorist attack in London. They said they planned to place five letter bombs in the post before Christmas and leave a device with a one-hour timer with DHL.

Chowdhury and Rahman subsequently travelled by bus into the city centre, touring sites between 3.30pm and 9.30pm. They got off the bus in Trafalgar Square and walked along Whitehall towards Westminster. They were observed looking at Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, Houses of Parliament, the London Eye, Blackfriars Bridge and the Church of Scientology in Queen Victoria Street.

After visiting a McDonalds restaurant in Cannon Street, Chowdhury and Rahman boarded a bus back towards east London.

On their return to Cardiff, Miah and Desai were seen looking at components for a bomb and talking about constructing a pipe bomb.

The pair visited the New Foundations Cosmetics and Toiletries shop and discussed buying a clock or watch. Desai talked about an explosive device with flour, battery and wires.

A Mumbai-style attack

On Dec 4, Miah called Chowdhury at 8.38pm and expressed his concerns about rushing the plan, comparing it to the time taken to plan and execute the 9/11 attacks. He emphasised that if one of them was caught, “everything is finished”.

In the early hours of Dec 12, Chowdhury took a coach to Cardiff. He was collected by Miah, who told him that they were “brothers” planning a Mumbai-style attack. They were being so careful about speaking openly, that at one point, they struggled to understand each other. They also discussed Chowdhury’s research of targets, including the London Stock Exchange.

The three men met the Stoke gang — Shahjahan, Hussain and Khan — at Cwm Carn Country Park near Newport. The men prayed together, led by Shahjahan, and then huddled in a group and spent an hour in discussion. At around 1pm they were seen standing in a circle, talking and reading from pieces of paper. Afterwards the Stoke group discussed getting training and agreed their main asset was “the Pakistani link”. Hussain said it was good that Chowdhury was calling Shahjahan the “emir” [leader].

THE FINAL STAGES

Chowdhury boarded a bus back to London at about 6pm, arriving three and a half hours later. On the journey he was seen looking at a folded piece of paper, thought to be a list of targets that was found at his home.

At Khan’s home in Persia Walk, Stoke, on Dec 14, he was joined by Rahman and Shahjahan who discussed attacking pubs and clubs in the Stoke area by leaving devices in the lavatories.

On Dec 18 Miah said his motives were to “crumble the economy, destroy the infrastructure not just physically but mentally everything”. He said the covenant by which Muslims agree not to attack the state in which they live did not stand according to Islamic law.

By Dec 19, security services decided they could not wait and the three groups were arrested the following day. Police raided Chowdhury’s London home and discovered the list of terrorist targets.

Þ Mohammed Chowdhury, 21 and Shah Rahman, 29, from London, pleaded guilty to taking part in the London Stock Exchange plot alongside Abdul Miah, 25, and his brother Gurukanth Desai, 30. Omar Latif, 28, also from Cardiff, pleaded guilty to attending meetings with the intention of assisting others to prepare or commit acts of terrorism.

Mohibur Rahman, 27, from Stoke, pleaded guilty to possession of a document containing information useful to a person preparing an act of terrorism. The charges relate to three editions of al-Qaeda’s English language Inspire magazine.

Usman Khan, 20, Mohammed Shahjahan, 27, and Nazam Hussain, 26, all from Stoke, pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism.



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Telegraph

Terror gang who plotted to blow up London Stock Exchange could be free in six years

A terrorist gang involved in a plot to blow up the London Stock Exchange, the American Embassy and the home of Boris Johnson could be free in just six years.

Terrorists admit plot to bomb London Stock Exchange and US Embassy: Mohammed Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah

Image 1 of 6

(Clockwise from top left) Mohammed Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah

By Mark Hughes, Tom Whitehead and Duncan Gardham

2:42PM GMT 01 Feb 2012

The group of four Qaeda-inspired fundamentalists admitted planning to send mail bombs to their targets during the run up to Christmas 2010 and discussed launching a Mumbai-style attack on Parliament.

But they could all be out after just six years after the two ringleaders of the group were given an indication of their sentences before deciding whether or not to plead guilty.

Mohammed Chowdhury, described as the group’s “lynchpin”, and Shah Rahman, his accomplice, pleaded guilty following a so-called Goodyear hearing where the judge gave them an indication of their maximum sentences should they plead guilty.

The judge, Mr Justice Wilkie, told Chowdhury, 21, that he would be sentenced to no more than 13 and half years, while Rahman, 28, was told he would be given 12 and a half years if he admitted his involvement in the plot.

The two, along with fellow conspirators Gurukanth Desai, 30, and Abdul Miah, 25, admitted the charges of preparing for acts of terrorism after being made aware of the sentences they were likely to serve.
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Website allowed terrorists to come together to plot carnage
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Terrorists admit plot to blow up London Stock Exchange
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It was part of a controversial 'Goodyear Direction' which allows defendants to judge whether they should plead guilty, depending on the sentence they are likely to face.

Had they been opted to go to trial instead and been found guilty by a jury, they would likely have been sentenced to approximately 20 years.

But now they could be out in fewer than six years. They will be released automatically at the half-way point in their sentence and spend the remainder on licence.

They will also have a year deducted for time already spent on remand.

Four of the al-Qaeda inspired men were preparing a Christmas bomb attack on the London Stock Exchange, the American embassy and the home of London Mayor Boris Johnson.

Two of the men conducted a surveillance trip around central London and also talked about launching a Mumbai-style attack on Parliament.

A “target list” was found at the home of the ring-leader which listed the names and addresses of Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London, as well as two Rabbis and the American Embassy. It had on it the letters ‘LXC’ for London Stock Exchange.

Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London (PA)

Torn pieces of paper showed a sketch of what is believed to be a car bomb.

Three other men met with the plotters and planned to travel abroad to get more training before returning to launch further attacks. Another two men pleaded guilty to associated charges.

The men, from London, Stoke and Cardiff, were inspired by al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsular (AQAP) and used their English-language magazine Inspire as a guide.

In Stoke the gang talked about attacking local pubs and clubs but decided to travel abroad to get more training.

In East London, Mohammed Chowdhury, 21, the ring leader, and Shah Rahman, 29, were under surveillance as they toured central London sites for six hours between 3.30pm and 9.30pm on November 28 2010.

They got off a bus in Trafalgar Square and walked along Whitehall towards Westminster. They were observed looking at Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, the London Eye, Blackfriars Bridge and the Church of Scientology on Queen Victoria Street.

The interior of Westminster Abbey, London (Alamy)

After visiting a McDonalds restaurant on Cannon Street in the City of London, the two men boarded a bus back towards East London.

In the bedroom at Chowdhury’s flat in the Isle of Dogs, police found a handwritten target list on a folded piece of A4 paper on the computer desk.

The Stoke group have their origins in Pakistan, while the London and Cardiff groups were originally from Bangladesh.

The three groups were inspired by Anwar al-Awlaki, one of the leaders of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsular, who died in a drone attack last year.

The defendants made contact with each other through dawah – proselytising - or by Paltalk or other internet messaging.

Meetings took place in November and December 2010 at which the defendants planned to use explosive devices to attack significant locations in London and around the country.

Their plans could be carried out without much preparation and were very difficult to intercept, sources said.

The London and Cardiff groups were keen to act quickly, at first talking about sending mail bombs through the Royal Mail and then deciding on a plan to set off bombs in the toilets of the stock exchange.

(Clockwise from top left) Mohammed Shahjahan, Omar Latif (centre), Nazam Hussain, Usman Khan and Mohibur Rahman (PA)

The Stoke group talked about persuading others to take bombs into pubs in their area so that they would explode.

Abdul Miah, 25, said to be at the centre of the Cardiff gang, and his brother Omar Latif, 28, pleaded guilty to taking part in the Stock Exchange plot. Gurukanth Desai, 30, pleaded guilty to attending meetings.

Mohibur Rahman, 27, from Stoke pleaded guilty to possession of a document containing information useful to a person preparing an act of terrorism.

The charges relate to two editions of al-Qaeda’s English language Inspire magazine.

Usman Khan, 20, Mohammed Shahjahan, 27, and Nazam Hussain, 26, all from Stoke pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism.

At Khan’s home in Persia Walk, Stoke, police officers recovered a folded A4 sheet of paper which bore notes of the structure, roles and responsibilities of individuals in a terrorist cell.

It included the headings ‘structure’, ‘responsibilities’, ‘communication’ and ‘local’ and appeared to be written by Shahjahan.



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Telegraph

Website allowed terrorists to come together to plot carnage

The terrorists who were plotting to blow up the London Stock Exchange and the US Embassy had made contact with each other through websites which included instant messaging site Paltalk.

The terror gang met each other and kept in touch through inernet sites like Paltalk Photo: Alamy

By Victoria Ward

3:10PM GMT 01 Feb 2012

Paltalk is the world's largest online video chat community boasting more than four million members.

Users are able to choose from thousands of chat rooms in which they can see, hear and text each other. They can set up their own chat rooms or join one offering discussion on a subject of their choice from aerobics to Ethiopian current affairs.

Each subsection offers the chance to engage in a tranche of discussions which are open around the clock.

Users can log in to a basic version of the site for free but can pay up to £15 a month for better quality video and the ability to participate in up to five chats simultaneously.

The US-based site was at the centre of controversy in 2007 when Kevin Whitrick, 42, from Telford, Shropshire, killed himself after being goaded in an "insult" chatroom, in which users hurl abuse at each other.

Related Articles

Generation of terrorists being groomed in British jails
01 Feb 2012

Whitrick hung himself in front of his webcam after Paytalk users were said to have "egged him on, telling him to get on with it".

The death highlighted concerns that some unregulated internet forums encourage people to take their lives.

Paytalk was also reportedly used by Muslim extremists to broadcast sermons.

Anjem Choudary, founder of the banned group Islam 4 UK, Omar Bakri Mohammed, who caused outrage in Britain by praising the hijackers behind the September 11, 2001 attacks and was banned from re-entering the UK in the wake of the 7/7 bombings, and Abdullah el-Faisal, who was deported in 2007, were said to have joined forces to use the site to preach their message around the world.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2012 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Al-Qaida-inspired plotters planned attacks on high-profile London targets

Men plead guilty to planning bombings of targets including stock exchange, US embassy and Boris Johnson's home

Sandra Laville, crime correspondent
guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 1 February 2012 10.43 GMT
Article history

The London Stock Exchange was one of the potential targets. Photograph: Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

An al-Qaida-inspired gang of terrorists has admitted plotting to bomb the London Stock Exchange and targeting Big Ben and Westminster Abbey, after an 11th-hour plea bargain in court.

A handwritten list included the names and addresses of the London mayor, Boris Johnson, two rabbis, the US embassy and the London Eye as potential targets to attack in the runup to Christmas 2010.

The group's alleged "linchpin" was Mohammed Chowdhury, a 21-year-old from east London, who pleaded guilty at Woolwich crown court to preparing to commit an act of terrorism.

He and eight other men from London, Cardiff and Stoke-on-Trent were due to face trial this week. At the last minute they admitted the terror plot, but denied the intention was to cause death or injury.

Undercover detectives had followed Chowdhury and his right-hand man, Shah Rahman, as they observed Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, the London Eye and the Houses of Parliament on 28 November 2010, during an extensive surveillance operation that eventually led to the arrest of the gang.

Chowdhury was told by the trial judge, Mr Justice Wilkie, that he could face a jail term of 13 and a half years, plus a five-year extended licence period.

The men, who had initially claimed that their meetings were part of an innocent plan to raise money for an Islamic project in Kashmir, were also said to have plotted attacks on pubs in the West Midlands. They were understood to be preparing to make a bomb and detonate it at the London Stock Exchange by pretending to be traders and planting explosives in the toilets in the hope that the building would catch fire.

The arrests were the result of one of the biggest and most comprehensive anti-terrorist investigations of recent years. The men were the subject of a surveillance operation led by MI5 which targeted their homes and cars, and undercover officers followed their movements as they were examining targets.

The plotters met through membership of various extremist Islamist groups and stayed in touch over the internet, through mobile phones and at specially arranged meetings – held in parks in a bid to make surveillance difficult. It is understood that some of the Stoke group had been planning to travel to Pakistan to a training camp with the aim of developing a long-term plot, probably within the UK.

Chowdhury and Rahman from east London and the Cardiff contingent were regarded as more like self-starters who probably held radical views for a long time but had taken the next step after immersing themselves in the philosophy of Inspire magazine, which promotes the ideology of Anwar al-Awlaki who was al-Qaida's leader in the Arabian peninsula. The key message from the publication was "get out there and do it", said investigators. Investigators know that Inspire has encouraged lone-wolf behaviour in the past, and they were worried to see a group of individuals behaving like a "pack of wolves".

The nine had been due to face a five-month trial, but pleaded guilty as part of a Goodyear Direction, which allows a defendant to weigh up whether they should plead guilty depending on the sentences they are likely to face.

Chowdhury and Rahman could be out of prison in six years; they will be released automatically at the halfway point of their jail term and spend the remainder of time on licence. If they had gone to trial and been found guilty they would have been sentenced to about 20 years in jail.

The group – to be sentenced next week – were inspired by Anwar al-Awlaki, the US-born Islamist cleric who was al-Qaida's leader in the Arab peninsula until he was killed in a drone attack last September. Chowdhury and his followers collected messages sent out by Awlaki, who had masterminded a plot to send bombs disguised as printer cartridges to US synagogues on cargo planes. His plan failed when the packages were intercepted.

The men are understood to have followed instructions to copy Awlaki's mail bombs in an al-Qaida magazine published five days before their first meeting in November 2010. The publication, Inspire, detailed Awlaki's attempt to post the bombs to synagogues in October 2010.

Chowdhury and his co-defendants, Gurukanth Desai, 30, his brother, Abdul Miah, 25, Shah Rahman and Mohibur Rahman, were found with copies of the magazine as well as an earlier edition. Rahman was told he could expect a 12-year sentence with a five-year extended licence for preparing to commit an act of terrorism.

Andrew Edis, prosecuting, said: "The role of Inspire magazine and al-Awlaki and the fact they were carrying out a small but high-profile and spontaneous attack shows they were in fact implementing the published strategy of al-Qaida in the Arab peninsula."

The nine men were arrested on 30 December 2010 [20th actually but never mind] after months of surveillance by police – led by anti-terror officers from the West Midlands force. They had first met face-to-face at Roath Park in Cardiff in November 2010, where they discussed their ideas.

Chowdhury was nicknamed JMB by his co-defendants – after the banned terrorist group Jamaat ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh. He and the others moved on from their first meeting to testing out bomb recipes, which they referred to as "cooking". It is understood that Miah and Desai caused an explosion in the street at one of their meetings in Wales.

Chowdhury and Rahman are also understood to have built pipe bombs at Chowdhury's home in Poplar, east London. Two other members of the group were recorded by a police surveillance operation denying the Holocaust.

Addressing Chowdhury, the judge said: "The intention was that [the bomb] should cause terror, economic damage and property damage. There was, however, a serious risk that it should cause death and serious injury.

"It was intended that this should be carried out in the near future, however at the time of the arrest no materials had been obtained nor firm dates had been set.

"The detailed target had been developed during the indictment period; various other projects were also considered during this time."

Chowdhury, he said, was the linchpin. He had carried out significant research of the target and construction of the device, the judge said. With Rahman they "in due course became party to a plan to place a live explosive device in the stock exchange".

Chowdhury and Rahman had visited London landmarks including the London Eye and Westminster Abbey after a meeting with Miah and Desai on 28 November 2010. They were also seen examining the Palace of Westminster, Blackfriars Bridge and the Church of Scientology in London.

Henry Blaxland QC, defending Chowdhury, however, said the basis of his guilty plea was that it quite specifically involved "no intention to cause death or injury".

Chowdhury, Rahman, Usman Khan, 20, of Stoke, Nazam Hussein and Mohammed Shahjahan, both also from Stoke, Miah and Desai, both from Cardiff, all admitted engaging in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism, contrary to section 5(1) of the Terrorism Act 2006.

Mohibur Rahman, from Stoke, admitted possession of an article for a terrorist purpose; namely, copies of Inspire magazine from summer 2010 and autumn 2010.

Omar Latif, 28, from Cardiff, admitted assisting others to engage in preparation for acts of terrorism by travelling to and attending meetings on 7 November and 12 December 2010. All nine defendants denied conspiring to cause an explosion or explosions of a nature likely to endanger life or cause serious injury to property.

Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Latif, Desai and Miah further denied possessing a document or record containing information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing for an act of terrorism. They will be sentenced next week.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plea bargaining meant none of this case was tested in court - and possibly the dangers of having a dodgy legal team played a large part too.
Doesn't look to me like these chaps seriously planned anything. Again the use of tourist type photos of the House of Commons etc etc as a so called 'terror target'.
All extremely dubious and nothing to do with Britain's tradition of innocent until proven guilty.

Toxic combination of genuinely unjust wars abroad - the tenth crusade to steal Muslim lands and resources, entrapment techniques of western intelligence and some probably very naive dupes.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meanwhile, only 9 days previous, it looked like we were all set for a proper trial, where, with a good barrister and a prevailing wind, "evidence" could be tested in front of a jury to give voice to their unanimous pleas of not guilty ....

Quote:
Cardiff, Stoke and London Jihadis go on trial

Published on Monday 23 January 2012 18:53

A jury has been selected in the trial of nine terror suspects, including four from Stoke-on-Trent, accused of plotting attacks on major London landmarks.

The Stock Exchange and the US embassy were on a list set to be targeted by the group, prosecutors claim.

A jury of nine men and three women was selected but not sworn in at London’s Woolwich Crown Court.

The suspects, aged between 20 and 30, were arrested in a series of counter-terror raids in Cardiff, London and Stoke-on-Trent.

They all denied conspiring to cause explosions likely to endanger life or damage property, last month. They also pleaded not guilty to preparing for acts of terrorism.

The group is also accused of agreeing on targets, discussing materials and methods, carrying out reconnaissance work, attending operational meetings and downloading and researching files “containing practical instruction for a terrorist attack”.

Six of the men are also accused of possession of a document “containing information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing for an act of terrorism”.

The defendants from Cardiff are Gurukanth Desai, 30, of Albert Street, Omar Sharif Latif, 28, of Neville Street, and Abdul Malik Miah, 25, of Ninian Park Road.

The defendants from London are Mohammed Moksudur Rahman Chowdhury, 21, of Stanliff House, Tower Hamlets, and Shah Mohammed Lutfar Rahman, 29, of St Bernard’s Road, Newham, both east London.

The defendants from Stoke-on-Trent are Nazam Hussain, 26, of Grove Street, Usman Khan, 20, of Persia Walk, Mohibur Rahman, 27, of North Road, and Abdul Mohammed Shahjahan, 27, of Burmarsh Walk.

Source

Quoted from this source which had been updated on 25.1.2012




Then along came the Goodyear, "peek behind the judicial curtain", used as a set of emergency judicial brakes ...


Quote:
The starting point is fundamental.

The defendant is personally and exclusively responsible for his plea.

When he enters it, it must be entered voluntarily, without improper pressure.



One can only imagine what the implied, "proper pressure" may be ...

Quote:
We pause to note that, inevitably, robust advice from counsel creates a degree of pressure on his client, and, what is more, the situation in which the defendant is placed itself constitutes a further source of pressure.

Neither of these is improper.


Quote:
Turner emphasised that as far as possible justice should be administered in open court.

Nevertheless for a variety of reasons, freedom of access between counsel and the judge was not prohibited. The problem arose from any discussion between them about sentence. This created the danger of pressure, or the appearance of pressure on the defendant to plead guilty. Such pressure, coming from the court, was unacceptable.


In short, Goodyear removed the anomalies introduced by the Turner case, where improper and "incompletely informed" advice could be construed as "improper pressure".

All they did was to clarify the rules, the procedure and the distinction between the origin of the request and "source" of the advice, the Judge or Counsel and more importantly, because of past digressions, made the Judge stick to whatever sentence "indication" that he or she foretold.

Once you have read all of that and considered the "old normal" of plea bargaining and all of the "pressures" associated with being under indictment, whilst in custody, especially on terrorism charges, where the "facts" of the case have already been revealed by the media, to all of those 12 good men and true, before the case has even come to trial, you will see that "guilty pleas" under the new, "expeditious" provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 can, in these circumstances bear little or no relation to the guilt of the accused.

Good old British justice, working like it always has...

Things you won't hear from the Duncan Gardhams and Vikram Dodds of this world, who, after all, are only doing their jobs ....


Quote:
I am reminded that exactly the same thing happened to me in my youth.

I was up in court on a charge where I was offered a lesser charge if I pleaded guilty.

Knowing that I didn't do the thing I was accused of and being a stubborn young chap, I refused the plea bargain and decided to put my case before the court.

When I got into court, all of the charges were dropped, as there was no case to answer.

Had I been persuaded to take the option of a lesser charge I would have been found guilty for absolutely nothing.

The "Crown", in the form of some other chap, who was just doing his job, knew all of that of course, because that's why they offered the plea, knowing full well that they had no chance of a conviction.

And that's the way it has always worked, way before the Goodyear "clarification".



Plus ca change ...


And WMCTU finally reap the long awaited harvest of their original, unsuccessful "leaflet crimes" Operation Aragorn, so all is well ....and I guess exemplifies the "value for money" obtained from the vast expenditure from a somewhat "selectively constricted", public purse....


How the 9 miserable bombers, oops, I didn't mean to say 9 miserable bombers, were transformed from this, into the "glossy AQAP magazine", Inspired, but not full blown Al Q "members" you understand, hell bent on death and destruction can only be due to the furtive imaginations of those erudite chaps at WMCTU ... sssh, it's secret ...

Quote:
To all the people discussing on this issue, I am a resident of Cobridge and have met the young men shown on the news and regularly attend the stall that they set up in Cobridge. I have had many a conversation with them and they are very pleasant young men. I have not found any of their literature to be condoning violence or extremism. I have witnessed all colours and religions talking to these young men including police officers. The stall they hold is under a cctv camera so it is in no way hidden. All they are doing is promoting their religion as it should be seen and not as is portrayed. Anyone interested should pop down and speak to them then pass judgement. dawa given, Cobridge.

Original Source and here at J7



Quote:
Feb 2010 Only 'jail or death' will stop campaign.

Call centre worker Abu Bosher, aged 25, from Cobridge, said:

"If I was a genuine threat, they would have arrested me straightaway."


Former Haywood High pupil Abu Sumayyah, from Cobridge, said:

"They will not stop us unless they put us in prison, after making some more new laws, or unless we die."



Looks like prison then ....


.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daily Mail

Big Ben bomb gang out in six years: Outrage as terror plotters plead guilty in turn for light sentences

The conspiracy involved nine Muslim defendants

They were all British, living in London, Cardiff and Stoke-on-Trent

Al-Qaeda inspired radicals arrested FOUR days before they planned to plant bombs in London Stock Exchange toilets

By Rebecca Camber

Last updated at 12:44 PM on 2nd February 2012

A terror gang who planned a Mumbai-style bomb blitz in London could walk free in less than six years after striking an extraordinary 11th-hour plea bargain.

The four Muslim fanatics intended to unleash a Christmas campaign of atrocities with targets including the Stock Exchange, Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, the Palace of Westminster and the London Eye.

They and five others had been facing a five-month trial at Woolwich Crown Court and could have expected sentences of 20 years.

But at the 11th hour they decided to plead guilty after a judge indicated they would receive lesser sentences for admitting the plot.

The Crown wanted to avoid both the estimated £2.5million cost of a high-security trial and the possibility of acquittals.

So a rare so-called ‘Goodyear’ direction hearing was arranged in which defence barristers receive guidance from the judge about how long he plans to jail those accused if they admit their guilt.

In this case, Mr Justice Wilkie suggested ringleader Mohammed Chowdhury, 21, would receive no more than 13½ years and his 28-year-old accomplice, Shah Rahman, 12 years.

He said the case did not merit an indefinite imprisonment for public protection because their plans were not developed, and he took account of Chowdhury’s youth.

Chowdhury is likely to spend less than half of his sentence behind bars owing to time already served on remand, while Rahman can expect to be out in five years.

Following the Goodyear hearing, others who had lesser roles in the plot swiftly pleaded guilty knowing that they would attract even more lenient jail terms when they are sentenced next week.

Tory MP Patrick Mercer said a term of five or six years ‘does not seem particularly serious’ for acts of terrorism which could have killed many innocent people.

Guilty: (Top row and left on 2nd row) Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah, who were part of the quartet guilty of the most serious terror charges in the case. On the 2nd row, right, is Omar Latif, from Cardiff. Left to right on the third row are Usman Khan and Mohammed Shahjahan from Stoke and on the bottom row are Mohibur Rahman and Nazam Hussain, also from Stoke

‘I am not convinced in the deterrent effect of such a sentence. These individuals have all pleaded guilty to extremely serious crimes. The point being that part of their sentence will be a deterrent to further terrorism.’

Police arrested the Al Qaeda-inspired radicals on December 20, 2010, four days before they planned to plant their first bomb in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange.

They found a handwritten list of targets which included the home of London Mayor Boris Johnson, the Dean of St Paul’s Cathedral, two rabbis and the U.S. Embassy.

The group, inspired by one of the world’s most notorious terrorists Anwar al-Awlaki, planned to send five bombs in the post to London synagogues and the Church of Scientology headquarters and spread panic in Stoke-on-Trent by planting bombs in pub and club toilets.

But anti-terror police had bugged their homes and cars and heard discussions of a ‘Mumbai’ atrocity on the streets of Britain, mirroring the guerilla-style 2008 bombing and shootings which claimed 173 lives in the Indian city.

In a series of secret meetings, Chowdhury, of Tower Hamlets, and 28-year-old Rahman, from Newham, travelled from east London to meet other plotters from Cardiff, Omar Latif, 28, Gurukanth Desai, 30, and Abdul Miah, 25, in a country park in Wales.

There, they were met by another terror cell from Stoke-on-Trent comprising Usman Khan, 20, Mohammed Shahjahan, 27, Mohibur Rahman, 27, and Nazam Hussain, 26.

Police heard one of the bombers say: ‘The thing is we will have to cause a big explosion and blow up all the computers. This is not going to be small. It will burn the whole place down. It will happen the day before Christmas. Definitely we will do it, Inshallah (God willing).’

The plan was for the gang, wearing suits, to bluff their way into the Stock Exchange claiming to be shareholders.

In another conversation taped in a car, one said: ‘You know we have to go for a strike on a place that is world-wide remembered.’

The gang were heard laughing as they discussed buying AK47 assault rifles and sending five bombs via Royal Mail and DHL during the busy Christmas period.

At one point, brothers Miah and Desai went into a post office in Cardiff and examined Jiffy bags in which the bombs would be sent.

One was heard to say: ‘We are sending five IEDs. If one or two of them get through, good. Tick tock.’ On another occasion, one plotter said: ‘If we do three in the post then the economy will break.’

Police believe they were also planning to unleash a second wave of atrocities at Easter.

Covert recordings caught Miah and Desai praising Hitler and denying the Holocaust. A bug planted in their car recorded them talking about how the Muslims fought with Hitler in the Second World War and suggesting that not even 100,000 Jews were killed by the Nazis.

On November 28, 2010, Chowdhury and Rahman were followed as they went on a reconnaissance mission.

They were seen in Trafalgar Square and Westminster, where one held a mobile phone up and pointed at Big Ben.

Surveillance teams followed them to the South Bank as they observed the London Eye, before moving on to look at the Church of Scientology building on Queen Victoria Street near Blackfriars and ending up at McDonald’s for a meal.

Police later recorded Miah and Desai in the car, saying: ‘Five addresses. We will come here and let one go here. We will let go a bomb here.’ The group spent hours talking about making explosive devices.

Desai and Miah even carried out a dummy explosion in a residential street in Cardiff on December 10 after reading terror chief Anwar al-Awlaki’s magazine Inspire which contains an article called: ‘Make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom.’

Police decided to arrest them a day after Chowdhury and Shah Rahman started researching making a pipe bomb.

When officers swooped they found a car bomb sketch and an A4 handwritten target list at Chowdhury’s home. They also found hundreds of speeches and lectures by al-Awlaki.

Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Miah and Desai admitted preparing for acts of terrorism between November 1 and December 21, 2010.

Latif admitted engaging in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism by assisting others to commit attacks by attending operational meetings on November 7 and December 12.

Khan, Shahjahan and Hussain admitted the same charge but relating to attending operational meetings, fundraising for terrorism training, and preparing to travel abroad or assisting others to travel for terrorist training.

Mohibur Rahman admitted possessing an article for a terrorist purpose after police who scoured his home found two copies of Inspire magazine. Scotland Yard deputy assistant commissioner Stuart Osborne said: ‘We welcome the guilty pleas entered by all nine defendants today, following what was the largest counter-terrorism operation of 2010.’

Saleem Kidwai, secretary-general of the Muslim Council of Wales, said: ‘There should have been a harsher sentence to set an example to others.

‘The judge has made this decision but we feel this should not have been allowed.

‘Personally, I feel that they should have been judged according to what they did. The offences should have been judged more seriously.

‘Probably the judge thought that they are thinking of doing this and they had not actually done it. But it was a serious offence and this should have been taken into account.’


Campaign of hate whipped up on the web
by REBECCA CAMBER, JAMES TOZER and CLAIRE ELLICOTT

The nine-strong gang all followed a similar path, from poppy burning and militant preaching to terrorism.

All were born in Britain, save for Mohammed Chowdhury and Shah Rahman, but they shared a common hatred of the country where their parents and grandparents chose to settle after leaving Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Sources said they came from respectable families, who are ashamed of them.

The group’s ‘linchpin’, Chowdhury, a Labour supporter and keen football fan, lived in a council home near Canary Wharf in Docklands.

Police believe he coordinated the group, who met through their membership of various hard-core Islamic groups and stayed in touch over the internet.

They chatted over the instant messaging site Paltalk, which is the world’s largest online video chat community boasting more than four million members.

Unusually in a terror plot where offenders usually keep a low profile, at least two of the gang were prominent activists who had already become renowned for their violent views and were well known to police.

The terror cell members started out by distributing extremist leaflets and DVDs outside mosques and regularly set up stalls in Cardiff and Stoke, radicalising vulnerable members of the community.

Police believe that the gang drew inspiration from hook-handed cleric Abu Hamza and followed Muslim fanatic and hate preacher Anjem Choudary, whose most recent extremist group, Muslim Against Crusades (MAC) was banned last year after its members threatened to burn poppies for a second time on Armistice Day.
Radicalised: Police belive the gang were influenced by the sermons of Anwar al-Awlaki who was killed in a U.S. drone attack last September

Radicalised: Police belive the gang were influenced by the sermons of Anwar al-Awlaki who was killed in a U.S. drone attack last September

At least two of the defendants were members of MAC’s predecessor, Islam4UK, a group led by Choudary which became a banned terrorist organisation in January 2010.

Some of the defendants boasted to police that they had burned poppies on Remembrance Sunday and police found footage on their mobile phones.

In Stoke-on-Trent, Mohammed Shahjahan and Usman Khan were a familiar sight handing out leaflets and haranguing passers-by.

For two years they set up a stall outside the Territorial Army centre in Cobridge.

Police raided the homes of Shahjahan and Khan, along with three others in July 2008 as part of an investigation into a group suspected promoting extremist views.

At the time, Shahjahan said: ‘We are not terrorists. We haven’t been preaching violence or whatever they say we’ve been doing.’ After a 20-month police inquiry costing £83,000, the Crown Prosecution Service ruled that there was insufficient evidence to prosecute anyone for either terrorism or public order offences.

Within hours, Shahjahan, a call centre worker, was back at his stall in Burslem selling Islamic literature, CDs and DVDs and complaining to the BBC that their computers had not been returned.

A local councillor, Amjid Wazir, remembers: ‘I reported them to the police.

‘I believe they were part of Al-Muhajiroun (another banned Islamist group run by Choudary).

‘They were not working, just claiming benefits and handing out leaflets.’
'All were born in Britain, save for Mohammed Chowdhury and Shah Rahman, but they shared a common hatred of the country where their parents and grandparents chose to settle after leaving Pakistan and Bangladesh.'

By January 2010, Shahjahan and Khan had joined Islam4UK and they were seen at a demonstration outside a mosque in Cobridge held in support of Islam4UK’s planned march through the town of Wootton Bassett which honours repatriated British soldiers.

The protest was later abandoned after widespread condemnation.

In Wales, the three plotters, Omar Latif and brothers Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah, who lived within a few minutes of each other, also ran so-called ‘Dawah’ stalls.

Miah was well known to police and had a long and violent criminal record.

The labourer, whose wife was pregnant at the time of the plot, had convictions for possession of a prohibited weapon – a CS gas canister spray – possession of cannabis, intimidating a witness, false imprisonment, perverting course of justice, dishonesty and public order matters.

In 2010, police believe that the gang became increasingly radical after reading the sermons of Anwar al-Awlaki who was killed in a U.S. drone attack last September.

Al-Awlaki is said to have inspired a series of attacks and plots across the world from 11 September 2001 to the stabbing of a British MP and he became the most influential terrorist role model next to Osama Bin Laden.

He was the leader of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) – regarded as the most dangerous branch of the terror group outside Pakistan and Afghanistan.

The American-born cleric is credited with helping to recruit ‘underpants bomber’ British-based student Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, who is accused of attempting to blow up a flight bound for Detroit in 2009.

He is also suspected of orchestrating the ink jet printer plot in which an explosive package was sent on a cargo plane from Yemen to America via the UK in October 2010.

Video: Terror expert analyses the gang's plot

Dr Steve Hewitt of Brum Uni.

Quote:
I’m a British/Canadian academic interested in spying and surveillance, whether during the Cold War against subversives or in the present against terrorists.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BBC

London Stock Exchange bomb plot admitted by four men

01 February 12 14:19

Top; Mohammed Chowdhury and Shah Rahman, bottom; Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah (Copyright: West Midlands Police)

Four men inspired by al-Qaeda have admitted planning to detonate a bomb at the London Stock Exchange.

Mohammed Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah pleaded guilty to engaging in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism.

The men, from London and Cardiff, were arrested in December 2010 and were set to stand trial at Woolwich Crown Court.

Five other men have pleaded guilty to other terrorism offences and all nine will be sentenced next week.

The men, who are all British nationals, had been inspired by the preachings of the recently-killed radical extremist Anwar Al-Awlaki.

It emerged that those who admitted planning to target the London Stock Exchange wanted to send five mail bombs to various targets during the run up to Christmas 2010 and discussed launching a "Mumbai-style" atrocity.

A hand-written target list discovered at the home of one of the men listed the names and addresses of London Mayor Boris Johnson, two rabbis, the US embassy and the Stock Exchange.

The conspiracy was stopped by undercover anti-terror police before firm dates could be set for attacks.

The terrorists met because of their membership of various radical groups and stayed in touch over the internet, through mobile phones and at specially arranged meetings.

They gathered in parks in a bid to make surveillance difficult.

The court heard that Chowdhury, 21, and his London accomplice Rahman, 28, were followed by undercover detectives on 28 November 2010, observing Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, the London Eye and the Palace of Westminster.

Chowdhury, of Stanliff House, Tower Hamlets and Rahman, of St Bernard's Road, Newham, admitted preparing for acts of terrorism by planning to plant an improvised explosive device in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange.

A jury had been sworn in to hear the trial before the defendants changed their pleas to guilty.

Addressing the jurors as they were discharged, Andrew Edis QC, for the prosecution, said that the four involved in the Stock Exchange plot had not intended to maim and kill.

"Their intention was to cause terror and economic harm and disruption. But their chosen method meant there was a risk people would be maimed or killed," he said.

The men admitted the offences after a special hearing which allows a defendant to hear from the judge what sentence they may receive if they plead guilty on the eve of a trial.

Chowdhury was told by judge Mr Justice Wilkie that he would receive 18-and-a-half years and Rahman was told he would receive a maximum of 17 years.

Brothers Gurukanth Desai, 30, of Albert Street, Cardiff, and Abdul Miah, 25, of Ninian Park Road, Cardiff, also admitted the same count, namely preparing for acts of terrorism by planning to plant an improvised explosive device in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange.

Meanwhile, Omar Latif, 28, of Neville Street, Cardiff, admitted attending meetings with the intention of assisting others to prepare or commit acts of terrorism.

Four of the nine-man group are from Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire.

The quartet talked about leaving homemade bombs in the toilets of their city's pubs and discussed travelling abroad for terror training.

Three of the Stoke contingent admitted a lesser, specific charge - engaging in conduct for the preparation of terrorism between 1 November and 21 December 2010 - namely travelling to and attending operational meetings, fundraising for terrorist training, preparing to travel abroad and assisting others in travelling abroad.

Usman Khan, 20, of Persia Walk, Mohammed Shahjahan 27, of Burmarsh Walk and Nazam Hussain, 26, of Grove Street, all Stoke, admitted attending operational meetings in Roath Park, Cardiff on 7 November and in a Newport country park on 12 December.

The fourth Stoke defendant, Mohibur Rahman, 27, of North Road, admitted possessing two editions of al-Qaeda magazine Inspire for terrorist purposes.

Protect the public

Following the guilty pleas, DAC Stuart Osborne, senior national coordinator of Scotland Yard's counter-terriorism team, said: "We welcome the guilty pleas entered by all nine defendants today, following what was the largest counter terrorism operation of 2010.

"The investigation was coordinated by the West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit, working in close partnership with the national CT network, Staffordshire, South Wales and Metropolitan Police, the Security Service and Crown Prosecution Service.

"Our priority is, and always will be, the protection of the public."

Bob Quick, the country's most senior anti-terrorism police officer until 2009, said it was an important case, with serious acts being planned.

"It serves to remind us that there are still people out there in the country that are prepared to contemplate, conspire and even perpetrate serious acts of terrorism."

The Liberal Democrat peer Lord Carlile, the government's former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, said the case showed the value of the new law that made preparing for terrorism a criminal offence.

But he added he was disappointed the control orders had been abandoned for "the wrong political reasons".

"They should have remained in place until at least after the Olympic Games. I hope we will not rue the abandonment of control orders particularly with the tool of re-locating people who are suspected of being terrorists away from their normal home environment," he said.



.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
[Op Aragorn raids 1.7.2008]

More than 100 police officers raided five homes...


Quote:
Two thousand leaflets have been issued to residents outlining the operation and a DVD sent to 400 homes. BBC


Quote:
Some 330,000 computer files were examined over an 18-month period.


Operation Aragorn cost £83,000 over 20 months !

Are you sure ?

That's only £4,150 per moon ! Which can barely cover the Chief Super's exes

No wonder they didn't get anywhere if that's true. Me thinks WMCTU need more resources than a couple of PCSOs and a lollipop lady !

Shurely shome mishtake !

Either way, it's a rather expensive, taxpayers omelette to be wearing on your face after disturbing the collective peace and terrorising the neighbourhood, chasing the shadows of non-existent "leafletting non-crimes".

Which, after all is said and done, is what all of this is about ...

Aragorn - Lord of the Rings, Clash of Civilisations - geddit ?

*

Re: AQAP Inspire glossy fly trap mag Issue 3 - wasn't even put out, on t'interwebs, I mean "intercepted" on t'interwebs by Ben Venzke's Intel Center until 20 November 2010 !

*

They were going to be busy little bees weren't they .... the four that pleaded guilty to the ahem loo bomb ...


List of alleged, judiciously untried and untested "targets:"

Palace of Westminster

Westminster Abbey

The tower of Big Ben

The rosy red cheeks of the ...

London Stock Exchange - LXC ??? - opened new HQ in Paternoster Square by HMQ on 27.7.2004 alleged 24.12.2010 target date for loo-bomb

Previous LSE HQ - last bomb attack at 11 mins to 9 am on 20.7.1990 with a supposed warning given by a "man with an Irish accent"

LSE "Big Bang" - 27.10.1986, (also poss. Baltic Exchange 10.4.1992 & Bishopsgate 24.4.1993)

The London Eye - inaugurated by Princess Bliar on 31.12.1999

Mayor Boris Johnson - work address or home address depending on which story you read - born on 19.6.1963, elected 1.5.2008, in office 3.5.2008. City Hall opened by HMQ on 23.7.2002

The London HQ of the "Church" of Scientology in Queen Victoria Street - established 22.10.2006 - Clear ?

Gala dinners, jive bands and Tom Cruise: how the Scientologists woo City police

Quote:
London's Metropolitan Police Service includes Scientology in its list of groups to be given privileged security information in the event of a crisis. [68]


See: Met allows Cruise's sect access to data on security alerts


US Embassy

Dean of St Pauls Cathedral, Graeme Knowles "installed" on 1.10.2007 and letters Patent issued on 20.9.2007 (the day before DAC Peter Clarke announced his retirement)

Various letter bombs - "3 will break the economy" - well, maybe 4 or 5 might - c/w "Jiffy bag survey" !!!

Mumbai style attack - 26.11.2008

2 anonymous, obligatory Rabbis

oh and ...

Uncle Tom Cobley's Emporium of Westerm Imperialist bullsh*t ...


The relationships between these alleged "events" are here



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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BBC

6 February 2012 Last updated at 16:26

Stock Exchange plotters ruled out suicide bombing

Top; Mohammed Chowdhury and Shah Rahman, bottom; Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah The men planned to terrorise people and to damage the economy and property

A group of men decided against becoming suicide bombers because they wanted a "long-term future" as terrorists, a court has been told.

Mohammed Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah have pleaded guilty to engaging in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism.

The men, from London and Cardiff, were arrested in December 2010 and are being sentenced at Woolwich Crown Court.

Five other men have pleaded guilty to other terrorism offences.

Opening the Crown's case at the start of a three-day sentencing hearing Andrew Edis QC, prosecuting, said between them the nine men possessed "almost every famous jihadi publication" including copies of an online al-Qaeda magazine called Inspire.

Chowdhury, 21, and Rahman, 28, both from London; Desai, 30 and Miah, 25, all from Cardiff, have admitted the more serious offences.

What was observed...was planning for the immediate future, not involving suicide attacks, so that there would be a long-term future which would include further acts of terrorism”

Andrew Edis QC Prosecutor

Omar Latif, 28, from Cardiff; Usman Khan, 20, Mohammed Shahjahan 27, Nazam Hussain, 26, and Mohibur Rahman, 27, all from Stoke-on-Trent, have pleaded guilty to lesser offences.

But Mr Edis said they were all part of the same group.

'Serious acts of terrorism'

He said: "In October 2010 these nine defendants decided to form a group whose purpose was to support and commit acts of terrorism in furtherance of their religious belief.

"Travel abroad was contemplated by some in order that they could acquire skills necessary to commit such acts effectively, acts of terrorism involving harm, often including death, serious injury, terror and very substantial economic harm to the community at which they were aimed."

Mr Edis added: "These defendants had in overview decided that ultimately they would be responsible for very serious acts of terrorism.

"What was observed during the indictment period was planning for the immediate future, not involving suicide attacks, so that there would be a long-term future which would include further acts of terrorism."

One of the publications they possessed was Inspire, an English-language online magazine.

Its first issue featured an article on how to "Make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom", complete with step-by-step instructions.

The court was told this could produce a "viable" and lethal device within hours.

Another issue described creating the "ultimate mowing machine" by welding blades to the front and side of a 4x4 car and driving it into pedestrians.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yorkshire Post

Islamist radicals planned to use benefits to fund terror training

Published on Wednesday 8 February 2012 08:32

AN extremist inspired by al-Qaida called on British Muslims to claim benefits to raise funds for a terrorist training camp, a court has been told.

Usman Khan, 20, was secretly recorded talking about plans to recruit UK radicals to attend the camp in Kashmir, London’s Woolwich Crown Court heard yesterday.

He said there were only three possible outcomes for him and his fellow jihadists – victory, martyrdom or prison.

Khan’s home in Persia Walk, Stoke-on-Trent, was bugged as he discussed plans for the firearms training camp, which was to be disguised as a legitimate madrassa, an Islamic religious school, the court heard.

Discussing terrorist fundraising, he said that Muslims in Britain could earn in a day what people in Kashmir, a disputed region divided between Pakistan and India, are paid in a month.

He went on: “On jobseeker’s allowance we can earn that, never mind working for that.”

During the late-night meeting on December 4, 2010, Khan contrasted the action he was planning in support of jihad with the passive approach of Muslims like radical cleric Anjem Choudary.

Prosecutor Andrew Edis QC, opening the case on day two of a sentencing hearing, said: “Mr Khan, the prosecution say, reveals his intention to supply money and people to something which he describes in this as an existing set-up. He has recently returned from Pakistan, and the inference is he’s been there, and is going back there within a few weeks.

“That set-up from the outside will appear like a normal madrassa, but the inference is clear from that conversation that that’s indeed the place where firearms training will be available.”

He added: “It is also quite clear that the hope is that there will be a significant number of UK citizens who will attend there.”

Mr Edis said those who underwent training at the camp in Kashmir could have returned home and carried out attacks in Britain.

Khan, Mohammed Shahjahan 27, and Nazam Hussain, 26, all from Stoke-on-Trent, last week admitted engaging in the preparation of terrorism.

Mohammed Chowdhury, 21, and Shah Rahman, 28, both from east London, and brothers Gurukanth Desai, 30, and Abdul Miah, 25, from Cardiff, pleaded guilty to preparing for acts of terrorism by planning to plant a bomb in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange.

Omar Latif, 28, also from Cardiff, admitted attending meetings with the intention of assisting others to prepare or commit acts of terrorism, and Mohibur Rahman, 27, from Stoke-on-Trent, admitted possessing copies of al-Qaida magazine Inspire for terrorist purposes.

Some London and Cardiff members of the group discussed launching a “Mumbai-style” atrocity, while the Stoke extremists talked about setting off pipe bombs in the toilets of two pubs in their home city, the court heard.

Chowdhury, described as the “linchpin” of the group, spoke at a meeting on December 12, 2010 of original plans to attack the Houses of Parliament or the London Eye in “the Mumbai style”, the court heard.

But Mr Edis noted: “There is no evidence at all that this group had the physical capability to carry out a Mumbai-style attack.”

Christopher Blaxland QC, mitigating for Chowdhury, said his client became mixed up in Islamist extremism through his involvement in Anjem Choudary’s groups. He said the likelihood that Chowdhury “would have actually done something is frankly extremely remote”.

The hearing was adjourned until today when judge, Mr Justice Wilkie, expects to pass sentence.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Telegraph

Terrorism gang jailed for plotting to blow up London Stock Exchange

A gang of Muslim extremists inspired to launch a deadly UK terror campaign by hate preacher Anjem Choudary were jailed for a total of nearly 95 years today.

Terrorists admit plot to bomb London Stock Exchange and US Embassy: Mohammed Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah

Image 1 of 6

(Clockwise from top left) Mohammed Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah

3:32PM GMT 09 Feb 2012

Lynchpin Mohammed Chowdhury, 21, and righthand man Shah Rahman, 29, planned to plant a bomb in the Stock Exchange and were seen scouting other potential targets including Big Ben, Westminster Abbey and the London Eye.

A handwritten hit list containing the names and addresses of Boris Johnson, the dean of St Paul's Cathedral, two rabbis and details about the American Embassy was also found at Chowdhury's east London home.

Members of the gang hoped to launch a co-ordinated shooting and bombing attack on the capital in a 'Mumbai-style' atrocity in the run-up to Christmas 2010.

Six of the nine men had been personally taught by former Islam4UK spokesman Choudary, while four were also in contact with notorious convicted terrorists Abu Izzadeen and Sheikh Faisal.

Choudary has since claimed his former pupils' plans were 'taken out of context' by police.

The terrorists collected hate-filled texts by al-Qaeda 'ink bomber' Anwar Al-Awlaki, the mastermind behind a plot to send bombs disguised as printer cartridges to the US synagogues on cargo planes.

That plan failed when the packages were intercepted en route, while Al-Awlaki was killed by a US drone strike in Yemen last September.

Gang members Abdul Miah, 25, and his brother Gurukanth Desai, 30, were secretly recorded denying the Holocaust and chatting about Muslims fighting alongside Hitler in the Second World War.

The group, whose members hailed from Cardiff, Stoke-on-Trent and east London, also considered attacks on synagogues and pubs in the West Midlands.

They were all British citizens from Bangladeshi and Pakistani families, aside from Chowdhury and Rahman who moved to the UK from Bangladesh.

Stoke-based gangsters Mohammed Shahjahan, 27, Usman Khan, 20, and Nazam Hussain, 26, were raising money to set up a terror training camp on land owned by Khan's family in Kashmir, Pakistan.

Khan and Hussain planned to fly out to the site, next to an existing mosque, in January 2011.

They hoped to send 100 UK nationals for firearms training and discussed using bank fraud and even signing up for the dole to get the cash.

The group had already raised more than £2,000 when all nine defendants were arrested on December 20, 2010, after months of covert surveillance by the security services.

They were due to stand trial at Woolwich Crown Court but last week admitted a string of terrorist offences in an eleventh-hour plea bargain.

They had initially claimed their meetings were part of an innocent plan to raise money for an Islamic project in Kashmir.

Chowdhury, described as the 'lynchpin' of the terrorist plot, could now serve just six years in prison after pleading guilty to preparing to commit an act of terrorism.

Nicknamed JMB by his co-defendants - short for banned terrorist group Jammat-ul Mujahideen Bangladesh - was jailed for at least 13 years and eight months.

But he is likely to spend less than half of his sentence behind bars due to time served on remand.

The maximum sentence for the offences he admitted is life imprisonment.

Shah Rahman, from east London, along with Cardiff-based Miah and Desai, also admitted the offence.

Rahman was jailed for at least 12 years, Miah for at least 16 years and 10 months and Desai was jailed for at least 12 years.

They planned to make a bomb and detonate it at the Stock Exchange by posing as traders and planting explosives in the toilets in the hope the building would catch fire.

The gang also discussed sending explosives to the other targets in the Square Mile by Royal Mail and via courier firm DHL, in a plot inspired by Al-Awlaki.

They hoped to send five mailbombs to UK targets in the Christmas post and launch an even bigger attack the following Easter.

Stoke-based Mohammed Shahjahan, 27, Usman Khan, 20, and Nazam Hussain, 26, admitted travelling to attend operational meetings, fundraising for terrorist training and preparing to travel abroad with intent to commit acts of terrorism.

Shahjahan was given an indeterminate sentence with a minimum term of eight years and ten months.

Khan and Hussain were both given indeterminate sentences with a minimum term of eight years.

Mohibur Rahman, 27, also from Stoke, was jailed for five years after pleading guilty to possession of al-Qaeda magazines featuring bomb-making instructions 'for a terrorist purpose.'

And Omar Latif, 28, from Cardiff, admitted assisting the others to engage in acts of terrorism by attending two planning meetings and was jailed for 10 years and four months.

Sentencing the gang to a total of 94 years and eight months, Mr Justice Wilkie said: "About a year or more before the offences the offenders became actively engaged in the Muslim faith.

"They were attracted to and espoused a radical version of Islam that is rejected by most Muslims in the UK as illegitimate and a perversion of the faith.

"They became attracted to the influence of radical clerics who preached the obligation to become involved in a struggle not only to fight occupiers in Muslim lands but to attack non-Muslims in the UK.

"These views were associated with the radical cleric known as Anwar Al Awlaki, whose message included attacking Western countries by any means necessary.

"Great praise is due to the security services both for the thoroughness and sophistication of their monitoring of these defendants and their ultimate intervention before any harm could be done."

Chowdhury, Shahjahan, Khan and Rahman all had the numbers of hate-preachers Choudary, Izzadeen and Faisal in their phones at the time of their arrest.

Chowdhury made two phone calls to Izzadeen, born Trevor Brooks but often called Omar Brooks, in the days following his release from prison in October 2010.

A spokesman for banned Jihadi group Al Ghurabaa, he described the 7/7 London bombers as 'completely praiseworthy' and was jailed in April 2008 for terrorist fundraising and inciting terrorism overseas.

Sheikh Faisal, born Trevor Forest, was jailed for nine years for urging his followers to murder Jews, Hindus, Christians and Americans in 2003 and later deported to Jamaica.

Andrew Edis, prosecuting, said Chowdhury had been involved with radical Muslim activism including banned groups like Islam4UK since around 2008 and ran his own radical chatroom on the Paltalk website.

He added: "Mohammed Chowdhury attended protests and demonstrations and made contact with the other defendants via Paltalk.

"He distributed deliberately provocative posters and leaflets and he has attended poppy-burning protests, among other things."

The nine terrorists first met face-to-face in Cardiff's Roath Park - an inner city beauty spot popular with young families and students - on November 7, 2010, to discuss their ideas and potential targets.

Already suspicious they were being watched, they chose the meeting place to make surveillance difficult.

MI5 agents watched them praying and discussing their ideas near Roath Park Lake between 1.30pm and 5pm, before leaving in two cars.

The gang soon moved on to testing out bomb recipes, which they referred to as 'cooking', with Miah and Desai apparently causing an explosion in the street at one of their meetings in Wales.

Chowdhury and Shah Rahman are also understood to have started building pipe bombs at Chowdhury's home in Poplar, east London.

Seven of them met a second time in the Cwm Carn Country Park in Newport, south Wales, to discuss their planned attacks on December 12, 2010.

They were seen talking for two hours, from 12.30pm to 2.30pm, and engaging in prayers led by Shahjahan.

Chowdhury admitted planning to bomb the London Stock Exchange, but denied his intention was to cause death or injury.

His defence team argued he had been aiming to cause panic and economic damage.

The gang are believed to have followed instructions in an Al-Qaeda magazine - published just five days before their first meeting - to copy Al-Awlaki's mailbomb attacks on the US

The publication, called Inspire 3, described the attempt by the leader of Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) to post bombs disguised as printer cartridges to synagogues in October 2010.

All three were intercepted before they reached their targets, but the plan was still hailed as a success because of the fear and disruption it caused.

Chowdhury, Desai, Miah, Shah Rahman and Mohibur Rahman were found with copies of the magazine as well as an earlier edition, Inspire 2.

The publications included bomb-making instructions and articles praising Osama Bin Laden and 'underpants bomber' Umar al-Faruq Al Nigiri, who unsuccessfully tried to blow up a plane on Christmas Day 2009.

One passage reads: 'Have a convincing cover story for anything suspicious. The story needs to be good enough to convince a jury if you ever get that far.'

Another tells would-be terrorists: 'The best operation leads to maximum casualties or, equally important, maximum economic losses.'

The defendants also planned to use a notorious explosives recipe in one of the magazines called 'Make A Bomb In The Kitchen Of Your Mom.'

Chowdhury and Rahman visited London landmarks including the London Eye and Westminster Abbey after a meeting with Miah and Desai on November 28, 2010.

They were also seen looking at Westminster Abbey, The Palace of Westminster, Blackfriars Bridge and the Church of Scientology on Queen Victoria Street.

The pair caught a bus to Trafalgar Square, central London, at about 3.30pm and walked around the city centre before stopping for dinner at McDonald's on Cannon Street and leaving at 9.30pm.

Chowdhury, of Poplar, east London; Shah Rahman, of East Ham, east London; Khan, of Stoke-on-Trent; Hussain, of Stoke-on-Trent; Shahjahan, of Birmingham; Miah, of Cardiff and Desai, of Cardiff all admitted engaging in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism, contrary to section 5 (1) of the Terrorism Act 2006.

Mohibur Rahman, of Stoke-on-Trent admitted possession of an article for a terrorist purpose, contrary to Section 57 of the Terrorism Act 2000, namely copies of Inspire Magazine Summer 2010 and Inspire Magazine Fall 2010.

Latif, of Cardiff, admitted assisting others to engage in preparation for acts of terrorism, contrary to section 5 (1) of the Terrorism Act 2006, by travelling to and attending meetings on November 7 and December 12, 2010.

All nine defendants denied conspiring to cause an explosion or explosions of a nature likely to endanger life or cause serious injury to property. Those charges will now lie on the file.

Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Latif, Desai and Miah further denied possessing a document or record containing information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing for an act of terrorism.

Those charges, which will also lie on the file, variously relate to copies of Inspire Magazine Summer 2010, Inspire Magazine Fall 2010, and 39 Ways to Serve and Participate in Jihad.

*

Quote:
Shahjahan was given an indeterminate sentence with a minimum term of eight years and ten months.

Khan and Hussain were both given indeterminate sentences with a minimum term of eight years.


Goodnight Vienna ...

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

London Evening Standard

Nine bomb plot terrorists jailed

9 Feb 2012

Nine members of an al Qaida-inspired terror group that plotted to bomb the London Stock Exchange and build a terrorist training camp have been jailed.

Three of the Islamist extremists, who planned to raise funds for the camp in Pakistan and recruit Britons to attend it, received indeterminate sentences for public protection at London's Woolwich Crown Court.

Mohammed Shahjahan, 27, was jailed for a minimum term of eight years and 10 months, while fellow Stoke-on-Trent-based radicals Usman Khan, 20, and Nazam Hussain, 26, were ordered to serve at least eight years behind bars.

The court heard that the trio planned to establish the terrorist camp on land in Pakistan-controlled Kashmir owned by Khan's family and encourage a "significant" number of British Muslims to undergo training there. Khan and Hussain planned to travel to the camp and receive military instruction themselves before "obtaining first-hand terrorist experience in Kashmir", the hearing was told.

Passing sentence, the judge, Mr Justice Wilkie, said this was a "serious, long-term venture in terrorism" that could also have resulted in atrocities in Britain.

The Stoke extremists also talked about setting off pipe bombs in the toilets of pubs in their home town, the court heard.

The four fundamentalists who plotted to plant a pipe bomb in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange all received extended sentences, meaning they will have to spend an extra five years on licence after they are freed from prison.

Mr Justice Wilkie jailed Abdul Miah, 25, from Cardiff, for 16 years and 10 months, noting that he was the leader of a branch of the terrorist network and set the agenda "by virtue of his maturity, criminal nous, experience and personality". His brother, Gurukanth Desai, 30, from Cardiff, and Shah Rahman, 28, from east London, were jailed for 12 years, and Mohammed Chowdhury, 22, from east London, who was described as the "lynchpin" of the group, was sentenced to 13 years and eight months.

Omar Latif, 28, from Cardiff, was jailed for 10 years and four months, with an extended period on licence of another five years, for attending meetings with the intention of assisting others to prepare or commit acts of terrorism. Mohibur Rahman, 27, from Stoke-on-Trent, received a five-year prison sentence for possessing two copies of the online al Qaida magazine Inspire for terrorist purposes.

The men - who are all British citizens apart from Bangladesh-born Chowdhury and Shah Rahman - have spent 408 days on remand and this will be deducted from their sentences.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Terror camp plot was 'unlikely to succeed'

Thursday, February 09, 2012

The Sentinel

A STOKE-ON-TRENT terrorist's plans to set up a jihadi training camp in Pakistan were "highly unlikely" to succeed, a court has heard.

Usman Khan wanted to train fighters on his family's land in Kashmir in order to bring Sharia law to the region and he raised funds for his scheme in the Potteries.

Khan and three other men from Stoke-on-Trent are being sentenced at Woolwich Crown Court after admitting terrorism offences.

Joel Bennathan, mitigating for Khan, told the court yesterday that the plans were a long way from fruition and would most likely have resulted in the participants being detained by the Pakistani security forces.

He said Khan and his associates had only succeeded in raising "a few thousand pounds" for the project by the time they were arrested, along with five others, in December 2010.

Mr Bennathan said: "How realistic is it that a 19-year-old from Stoke-on-Trent would succeed in raising a banner for Sharia in Pakistan-controlled Kashmir? We say it is highly unlikely. "

Khan, aged 20, of Persia Walk, Tunstall, along with Mohammad Shahjahan, aged 27, of Burmarsh Walk, Burslem, and Nazam Hussain, aged 26, of Grove Street, Cobridge, admitted engaging in conduct in preparation for terrorist acts in November and December 2010.

The group came together due to their shared radical Islamist beliefs and their involvement in preaching on the streets of the Potteries.

Andrew Hall, mitigating for Shahjahan, said his client had been the most visible of the defendants, giving interviews to newspapers, including The Sentinel, and espousing his extremist views on a BBC documentary, where he had been made to appear "like a fool".

He said: "He was the most visible of these deluded young men. If anyone can be filed in the 'all talk' folder, it is Mohammed Shahjahan."

Shahjahan had been described by the prosecution as "the ameer", or leader, of the terror network, which also included men in Cardiff and London who were planning to bomb the London Stock Exchange.

But Mr Hall argued that the phone evidence proved that he had little authority over the other groups and had nothing to do with the bomb plot.

David Fisher, mitigating for Hussain, told the court that his client's grandfather and mother had both been killed in fighting in Kashmir, which had driven him to extremism and the desire to fight for Kashmiri independence.

The fourth Stoke-on-Trent defendant, Mohibur Rahman, pictured below, aged 27, of North Road, Cobridge, pleaded guilty to possessing an article for a terrorist purpose, namely electronic copies of Al-Qaida magazine Inspire.

His barrister David O'Neill described him as a "bedroom jihadist", who collected extremist literature and who was only marginally involved in the terror network.

The judge, Mr Justice Wilkie, is expected to sentence the defendants this afternoon.

Related stories:

Tunstall terrorist recorded inviting Muslims to jihadi training camp

Stoke-on-Trent terrorists helped launch Kashmir weapons camp

'It's frightening to think these men grew up in Stoke-on-Trent...'

Terrorists planned to plant bombs in city pubs

Extremist 'lynchpin' may serve just six years in jail

Terrorists exposed in covert operation

Former BT worker ran stalls giving out extreme literature

'Don't persecute Muslims because of actions of others'

Terrorists admit plots to bomb London Stock Exchange and attacks in Stoke-on-Trent

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BBC

9 February 2012 Last updated at 16:09

Stock Exchange plotters: Fantasists or a threat?

By Dominic Casciani Home affairs correspondent

Mohammed Shahjahan speaking in a BBC documentary in 2010. < video in BBC link

Nine men jailed over terror plot
Terror bomb plot was 'amateurish'
Four admit planning London bomb

Four men inspired by al-Qaeda have been jailed after admitting they planed to detonate a bomb at the London Stock Exchange. Another five have been sentenced alongside them. But how serious a threat did the nine men from London, Cardiff and Stoke-on-Trent pose?

When one of the nine men jailed on Thursday declared he was heading for victory, martyrdom or prison, he wasn't really aiming at the third option.

But the reality is that whatever these men were actually planning - or actually capable of - they were already under so much surveillance that it was only a matter of time before the handcuffs were on the wrists.

Operation Norbury, the police code name for the investigation, did not lead to any evidence of bombs. Police uncovered no parts hidden in suitcases in woods and no martyrdom videos.

But prosecutors said that there was evidence of intent and determination - and those thoughts had become provable crimes of planning. And on the eve of the trial, eight of the nine pleaded guilty to preparing for acts of terrorism.

Most of the men met each other through the stalls they ran from town to town. Some of this proselytising work was related to the men's involvement in the now proscribed group, Islam4UK.

Upclose and personal: Suspects under surveillance Upclose and personal: Suspects under surveillance

We don't know how many people found their message attractive - but they attracted the attention of the security services. And the key period in the investigation was six weeks in the lead-up to Christmas 2010.

On 7 November that year, there was what prosecutors describe as the first group meeting, involving seven of the men. Three of the Stoke defendants drove cross-country to Cardiff to meet the men from Wales. Mohammed Chowdhury, described in court as the linchpin, took a coach from London.

The men walked together in the open in Roath Park in the Welsh capital, something that prosecutors say they did to make surveillance difficult. The talk at that meeting was to focus ideas - but also to decide on the legitimacy of violence.

"Whiplash for the sake of Allah, innit”

Abdul Miah in a bugged conversation about car insurance fraud

The men had a question about whether Muslims could legitimately turn to violence if they were living in the West. Earlier that year, some of the world's leading Islamic scholars had made a declaration which dismantled, point-by-point, Osama bin Laden's claim that al-Qaeda's attacks against the West were religiously and legally justified.

It was one of a string of such religious rulings in the wake of 9/11. The men discussed its implications - and then ignored it.

They preferred the views of Anwar al-Awlaki, the now dead US-Yemeni preacher behind al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, who had been pumping out online his own English language justifications for violence.

And so, according to prosecutors, the men began working on their plans, reassured that they had religious backing to do so.

Key meetings

The key meetings came later in November and early December, particularly when Choudhury, Shah Rahman, Miah and Desai discussed possible targets.

Mohammed Chowdhury Mohammed Chowdhury was described by prosecutors as the "linchpin"

The men still had no settled plan - but the ideas included five mail bombs in the run up to Christmas, a "Mumbai-style" armed attack and targeting the London Stock Exchange. The Stoke defendants, the court heard, discussed setting pipe bombs in pub toilets.

Miah and Chowdhury thought that if they posed as stock brokers or shareholders they could casually walk into the exchange, pop to the loo and plant an incendiary device. The fire would eventualy burn down the building, bringing national economic ruin one step closer.

These were obvious flaws with the plan - not least the probable role of sprinklers and the London Fire Brigade. The surveillance indicated the men wanted to plant the device on Christmas Eve. The building would have been shut.

Co-defendants, left to right from top: Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai, Abdul Malik Miah, Usman Khan, Mohammed Shahjahan, Mohibur Rahman, Nazam Hussain and Omar Sharif Latif Co-defendants, left to right from top: Shah Rahman, Gurukanth Desai, Abdul Malik Miah, Usman Khan, Mohammed Shahjahan, Mohibur Rahman, Nazam Hussain and Omar Sharif Latif

Prosecuting and defence counsel told Woolwich Crown Court, following the late guilty pleas, that the wide-ranging plans were, to put it mildly, amateurish. None of them, for instance, had any idea how to get weaponry for an attack similar to the atrocities in Mumbai - and the prosecution accepted that it was never seriously considered.

The court heard that on another occasion Abdul Miah was musing about how he could raise enough cash for his plans. He considered faking car accident injuries so he could defraud insurance companies. He declared it would be: "Whiplash for the sake of Allah, innit."

But the security services were worried about the stock exchange plan because Chowdhury and Shah Rahman were later overhead going through detailed instructions for a pipe boomb.

And so, prosecutors told Woolwich Crown Court that a lack of sophistication did not equate to a lack of a threat.

Long investigation

The investigation into some of the men dates back to at least 2008. That summer, police raided homes in Stoke-on-Trent following what were described at the time as concerns raised within the community.

One of the men targeted in that operation was Mohammed Shahjahan, jailed on Thursday.

Usman Khan, Shahjahan and Nazam Hussain, apparently frustrated by Islam4UK - and its leader Anjem Choudary - decided they would do their own thing.

They wanted to get British men to a terrorism training camp in Kashmir, the court heard. This proposed camp, along with the London Stock Exchange proposal, were the only two plans that had been crystallised.

And it was this plan to run a camp, rather than focus on one single attack in the UK, that led Mr Justice Wilkie to conclude that these three from Stoke were "pre-eminent" and "more serious jihadis" than the others.

He said they they had a "longer-term view" and that the secretly recorded conversations showed they knew they could only successfully strike once they had obtained the skills to do so.

But before all of this surveillance led to the trial, Shahjahan appeared more openly in a religious documentary produced by the BBC about people called Mohammed.

In the interview, he was introduced as a former member of Islam4UK and he held up a sign, saying he has been deprived of his freedom of speech.

"Many people would call me a radical, a fundamentalist, maybe a terrorist," he said. "But if they say that I'm a terrorist because I'm calling for my faith, then fair enough. It doesn't mean nothing to me."

Quote:
Operation Guava:

Operation Guava was a terrorist investigation led by WMCTU into the activities of a number of individuals who were suspected of planning to carry out a terrorist attack in the run up to Christmas 2010. Twelve individuals were arrested under the terrorism act, of whom nine were subsequently changed with conspiring to cause explosions and Section 5 of the Terrorism Act 2006 as well as additional charges under Section 58 of the terrorism Act for some of the group. This investigation is scheduled for trial in 2012.

Source

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This must be a first:

Sentencing remarks, published in full ?

On the same day that they were sentenced ?

Hmmm. Substitute for a trial ?

Most odd. Good precedent though. More of same please. Thereafter, if the Crown is that confident of the "due process of law" and the integrity of their proceedings, perhaps we could have the "evidence" posted on the web too ...

Normally, you have to jump through hoops to get the Judges sentencing remarks, by writing to the Court for the Judge's attention and by proving you have a legitimate interest in the case, ie: are related or other such "valid reason". Other than that, you've got little chance of getting your mitts on them, such is the perilous state of our fledgling democracy and it's perilously fragile judicial institutions...

Unless of course you are Lord Carlile, then you can actually watch terrorism, while it is happening ...

Try ringing or writing to the CPS, the Courts or the police and asking for information, you virtually have to give your DNA before they will even tell you what day it is ...

If you're lucky and the Judge sees fit, you, having helped to pay through your taxes for the entire production in the first place, then have to pay for their transcription out of your own pocket.

Is this publication completely unprecedented or just unprecedented in a terrorism non-trial ?

The guilty ghost of the Goodyear fiasco in place of a proper trial, weighing heavily on his judicial brow ?

Or was it the potential evidential issues caused by the highly dubious provenance of the novel factual matrix allegedly Inspired by the faux propaganda that Mr Justice Wilkie is evidently so convinced was issued on the internet by Al Quaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, (AQAP) that afforded the Goodyear paradigm ?

Quite why anyone needs an internet publication to tell them to "weld pieces of metal to the front of their 4x4 and then drive it into a crowd of people" is way beyond my understanding.

We do now have an AQAP Inspired judicial precedent of course.

Now all we need to know is why they pleaded guilty. If they were indeed planning any of the things they are said to have been planning then they deserve everything they get.

However, pop into any local puborama, late on any evening you care to choose and take note of the conversations, alcohol fuelled threats to kill politicians etc., I'm sure Mi5 could have all the "terorrists" they wanted ...

I still don't understand how you go from open and transparent leafleting with the local plod fully aware and being raided by same, to bone fide "terrorists", in about 8 months, as the previous and "very cheap" investigation was only dropped in February 2010.

All we are left to assume is that no undue, or "improper" pressure was brought to bear and that they were advised correctly.

Dhiren Barot got a 40 stretch originally, having been threatened with more, for doing absolutely nothing, so I guess this bunch got off lightly.

No point in asking their barrister or solicitors as that's confidential and only the "Goodyear Guilty" parties will actually know why.


This is why your sons and daughters are dying in the heroin fields of Afghanistan - to keep us all safe from this utter nonsense ...


From open and transparent leafleting on the streets of Stoke-on-Trent to this.

Nice work WMCTU.

Anyone know what happened to the Muslim "convert" ?

*

First off, in a not guilty trial scenario, the entire premise and provenance of the "Al Q Inspire mag.," would have to proved beyond a reasonable doubt. That would mean subpoenas for the Rita Katz SITE Institute and Ben Venzke's Intel Centre crews, with forensic examination of their IP logs, who posted what, when and where and then proof, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the glossy fly trap for wannabe idiots originated anywhere near Yemen ...


While we're at it, prove also that the mythical Al Q actually exists and then also prove that AQAP exists and on what basis do they form a "legal entity" to be used in sentencing remarks ...

Now wouldn't that be interesting .... in front of a jury ...

Anyone can publish anything on t'interwebs and then claim that someone else did it. It's not difficult. What is difficult to understand is how Mr Justice Wilkie is so convinced of it as an absolute fact ?

It hasn't even been tested in the Courts of this land so how does it become an a priori legal position ?

Father Christmas and the Elves are "commonly accepted" "facts of life" but I'm guessing the Honourable Judge would not have ascribed sources to those entities in the first paragraph of his sentencing remarks, no matter how many "expert witnesses" were called to testify of the material's origin in Lapland ...

Looks like the nominally "Christianist" Judge, Mr Justice Wilkie has been subjected to the same fraud, which makes it a judicial fact I suppose.

Judge Wilkie even alludes to "Al Qaeda centre" wherever that is ...

I'm not in any way a legal beagle so don't really know what I'm talking about when I ask, on what legal basis can Al Qaeda even be referred to ?

Surely, to do so, one has to prove that it actually exists first ...

As for alleged terrorist training in Kashmir or elsewhere, surely the Foreigh Office could have flown them home after they had been arrested there, just like they did for Dr Faisal Mostafa.


*

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the Crown Court at Woolwich

Indictment No: T20117593

The Queen
-v-
Mohammed Chowdhury & Others

Sentencing Remarks of Mr Justice Wilkie

9 February 2012

Introduction

1. This is a difficult and complex sentencing of 9 offenders arising out of what the Crown says, and I accept, is a novel factual matrix namely, the commission of terrorist offences by fundamentalist Islamists who have turned to violent terrorism in direct response to material, both propagandist and instructive, issued on the internet by Al Quaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, (AQAP). It gives rise to a number of issues of principle and has a high profile.

I have, therefore, prepared these remarks in written form and they will be immediately available on the Judicial Website when this hearing has finished.

2. All of these defendants fall to be sentenced after pleading guilty to specific counts on the indictment, (counts 9, 10, 11 and 12) on specific bases of plea which the Crown says are acceptable to them.

3. All the defendants, save for Mohibur Rahman, have pleaded guilty to the offence of engaging in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism contrary to Section 5 (1) of the Terrorism Act 2006. The particulars recited in respect of counts 9, 10 and 12 are different from each other. In Count 9, the particulars, in respect of Usman Khan, Mohammed Shahjahan, and Nazam Hussain, are that they were engaged in conduct namely: travelling to and attending operational meetings, fund raising for terrorist training, preparing to travel abroad, or to assist others to travel abroad, to engage in training for acts of terrorism. In Count 10, the particulars in respect of Mohammed Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Abdul Miah and Gurukanth Desai are that they engaged in conduct with the intention of committing an act of terrorism: namely preparing to produce and detonate an explosive device in the London Stock Exchange. In Count 12, in respect of Omar Latif, the particulars are that, with the intention of assisting others to commit an act of terrorism, he engaged in conduct namely travelling to and attending meetings on 7th November and 12th December 2010.

4. Mohibur Rahman has pleaded guilty to possession of an article for a terrorist purpose contrary to Section 57 of the Terrorism Act 2000 namely, that on the 20th December 2010, he was in possession of “Inspire” magazine, Summer and Fall 2010 in circumstances which gave rise to a reasonable suspicion that their possession was for a purpose connected with the commission, preparation or instigation of an act of terrorism.

5. Originally, all these defendants faced an 8 count indictment which included, as against all of them, Count 1 - alleging a breach of Section 5 (1), the particulars being compendious and general in content and Count 2 – alleging conspiracy to cause an explosion in the United Kingdom. The circumstances by which the Defendants, respectively, have pleaded guilty to Counts 9, 10, 11 and 12 will be returned to later.

The Defendants and the basic facts

6. Save for Chowdhury and Usman Khan, who at the material time were 20 and 19 years respectively, all the Defendants were in their middle to late twenties at the relevant time in the late autumn 2010. They all either had been born in the United Kingdom or had been born in Bangladesh and come to this country a number of years before these events. The five defendants who were based in London or Cardiff and 2 of the Stoke based offenders were Bangla Deshi in origin. Of the 4 who lived in Stoke 2, Usman Khan and Nazam Hussain were Pakistani in origin and their families came from the same village in Kashmir. Chowdhury, Omar Latif, Usman Khan, Mohibur Rahman and Nazam Hussain have no previous convictions. Shah Rahman has one only, which was committed during the period covered by this indictment. Desai has minor convictions, Shahjahan has previous convictions and Abdul Miah had a significant history of criminal convictions between 2004 and 2007 involving, amongst other things, possessing two prohibited weapons for the discharge of noxious liquid gas in 2005, threatening behaviour, also in 2005, theft from a person and false imprisonment for which, in 2007, he served a sentence of 18 months imprisonment and a recent offence of fraud. Both Miah and Desai, who are brothers, have had a number of aliases and have changed their names by deed poll.

7. In each case, according to their defence case statements, there came a time, about a year or more before these events, when the offenders became actively engaged in the Muslim faith. They were attracted to and espoused radical versions of Islam which are rejected by the vast majority of Muslims in the United Kingdom and elsewhere as illegitimate and a perversion of that faith. Be that as it may, it is clear, from a meticulous survey of the evidence by the prosecution that, in becoming so attracted, they fell under the influence of radical or extremist clerics who preached an obligation, by way of Jihad, to engage in struggle including not only fighting non-Muslim occupiers of Muslim lands, but also extending the fight to attack civilians within the United Kingdom. This particular doctrine, which rejects the concept of the “covenant of security,” that if you live in a western country you should not attack your host country directly, is espoused by Al Quaeda based in the Arabian Peninsular (AQAP) and is associated with a radical preacher known as Anwar Al Awlaki, now dead, whose aims include attacking Western Countries by any means possible.

8. Each of these defendants, in their different ways, engaged actively in proselytising their radical Islamism in public by preaching, a process known as Da’wah. By so doing, as they were fully aware, they came to the attention of the security services.

9. I accept the contention of the Crown that, through a network of meetings held across the country for the purposes of Da’wah, some of the offenders, in Stoke, Cardiff and London came to know, or to know of, some of the others and there came a time, in late autumn 2010, when these defendants, in their separate locations, began to associate with one and other for a purpose which, as far as 8 of them is concerned, went beyond preaching or missionary work or proselytising. They took the step of deciding to engage in, and engaging in, conduct in preparation for terrorist violence as advocated by AQAP and Anwar Al Awlaki in particular. In the summer and autumn 2010 AQAP published on the internet magazines known as “Inspire”. There was a summer and an autumn edition as well as another publication “39 ways to serve and participate in Jihad”. The avowed purpose of Inspire was to reach out to those in distant lands, who might support the AQAP view of the world, to encourage them, independently and of their own initiative, to engage in violent acts wherever they might be.

10. It is the Crown’s case, which I accept, that the lynchpin of the coming together of the defendants from their various geographical locations was Mohammed Chowdhury who acted as a sort of convenor or conduit. I also accept from the evidence that, whilst he had that role, and that, as between him and Shah Rahman, his fellow Londoner, he took the lead, he was by no means the leader of the group which then coalesced. I also accept that he was an obsessive self publicist. I accept on the evidence, which I have been taken through at length by the prosecution in opening, that, of the three groups, the Stoke group was, and was considered to be, pre-eminent. They had a longer term view, were focussed, among other things, on fundraising for their plans to establish and recruit for a terrorist military training facility under the cover of a madrassa on land owned by Usman Khan’s family, where there was already a mosque, and looked to the others to supply them with substantial quantities of cash. They eschewed, having briefly considered it, the taking of immediate action, as untrained novices, such as bombing certain pubs in Stoke. Rather, they intended to proceed on a more long term and sustained path, to establish and operate that terrorist military training facility, at which Usman Khan and Nazam Hussain would train, which would make them, and others whom they would recruit to be trained there, more serious and effective terrorists. They would initially operate in Kashmir but later may return to the UK and may commit acts of terror in this jurisdiction, though it was not a plan that they should do so. I also accept that, within the Stoke group, Shahjahan was the leader but that Usman Khan and Nazam Hussain were very close to him in the hierarchy. I also accept that, of the Cardiff and London groups, Miah was preeminent by force of his personality, as evidenced in the role he took in meetings and discussions, and from the fact that he was experienced in the ways of crime and, in particular, on the use of aliases and false identities. He was one of the London/Cardiff group whom the Stoke group appeared to take seriously as a potentially useful recruit. I also accept that Miah’s brother, Desai, was also well regarded by the Stoke group but I also accept, as is common ground and clear from the monitored discussions, that he played a subordinate role to Miah. I accept that Shah Rahman was not highly regarded by Miah and was not allowed to attend an important meeting in Cardiff on 12 December. I also accept that, even on that day, he managed to draw attention to himself by being arrested for a minor public order offence in London. I accept that Latif, though a well regarded member of the Cardiff group who attended the 7th November and 12th December meetings, in fact never participated in the preparation of any specific action.

11. The events relied on by the crown include meetings of members of all three groups in parks in Cardiff and Newport on the 7th November and 12th December, attended by most of the Offenders. There was also a visit by Desai and Miah to London where they spent significant time with Chowdhury and Shah Rahman driving around various parts of London and engaging in pointed discussions in which a number of possible terrorist actions were discussed including sending 5 letter bombs through the post or by DHL. In fact that idea was soon abandoned as impracticable. A Mumbai style attack, which was briefly mentioned in passing by members of the London/Cardiff group was, it is accepted by the crown, never seriously considered.

12. There was also monitoring of conversations in various properties and vehicles in London, Cardiff and Stoke, the fruit of which has been very helpfully dealt with by Mr Edis in his extensive and meticulous opening of the case

13. The Crown’s case, which is not now disputed by the defendants, is that the purpose of these meetings and the subject of many of the monitored discussions, was discussion of possible ways for them, either in their separate geographical areas or together, to start engaging in terrorist violence.

14. It is clear from the wide ranging discussions that the groups were considering a range of possible actions. They included fund raising for the establishment and operation of the terrorist military training madrassa in Pakistan, undertaking training there and recruiting others to undertake terrorist training there, sending letter bombs through the post, attacking pubs used by British racist groups, attacking a high profile target with an explosive device and a “Mumbai” style attack by terrorists. As I have indicated the only ideas which the crown say crystallised as intentions, which were the subject of any preparatory acts, were in respect of the madrassa and the placing of a small, but potentially lethal, explosive device, a pipe bomb, in a toilet in the London Stock Exchange and are the subject, respectively, of counts 9 and 10.

15. By the time of the period covered by the indictment, the 1st November to the 21st December, the Security Services had become aware of the emergence of this group as a possible source for terrorist activity and it is clear that they embarked on a resource intensive and highly sophisticated process of monitoring and surveillance. So successful was it that, on the evening of 19th December, Chowdhury and Shah Rahman were overheard going through, in some detail, instructions to construct a pipe bomb contained in the Inspire 1 magazine under the heading “Make a bomb in the kitchen of your Mom” which had been downloaded onto Shah Rahman’s computer at 19:43, some 18 minutes before the conversation began. As it seemed that an act of violence by using a pipe bomb was imminent, the Security Services intervened early the following morning and all the defendants were arrested.

16. Great praise is due to the Security Services both for the thoroughness and the sophistication of their monitoring and their surveilling of these defendants, as well as their alertness to intervene at the optimum time before any harm could be done by the offenders. As a consequence these nine have pleaded guilty to very serious offences.

The Indictment and the Pleas of Guilty

17. The indictment, as originally drawn, included, as count 1, a Section 5 offence. The particulars read as follows “Between 1st November and 21st December 2010 with the intention of committing an act or acts of terrorism or assisting others to do so engaged in conduct in preparation for giving effect to that intention namely travelling to and attending operational meetings, discussing methods, materials, targets for a terrorist attack, carrying out reconnaissance on and agreeing attack targets, downloading researching and discussing electronic files containing practical instruction for a terrorist attack, obtaining the means and materials for such an attack.”

18. That is a compendious list of all the activities observed and monitored by the Security Services during the relevant 7 weeks or so. If it had been contested and tried it would have involved a trial of many months and, on a finding of guilt, such a finding in respect of all of the facets of the activities of the group to which I have referred, including the wide ranging discussions about different forms and sites for attacks.

19. The jury for this trial was sworn on 24th January. The prosecution needed a few days to put the finishing touches to its opening to reflect its final view on certain disputes about the accuracy about certain transcripts of conversations. During that period the prosecution and the defence embarked on discussions about the defendants’ pleading guilty on specific bases. The first defendants to plead guilty were 3 of the Stoke defendants, Usman Khan, Shahjahan and Hussain who pleaded guilty to count 9. The basis of that plea was as follows: first, they were trying to raise funds to build a Madrassa beside an already existing Mosque in Kashmir: second, the long term plan included making the Madrassa available for men who would be fighting to bring Sharia to Kashmir in Pakistan: third, the plan included some, including at least one of the Stoke defendants, being able to have fire arms training in or around the Madrassa; fourth, they did not intend to participate in an act of terrorism in the UK in the immediate future. Fifth, they contemplated that, once trained, they might return to the UK and engage in some sort of terrorist activity but there was no timetable, no targets identified, nor any method agreed. The Crown on its part agreed that it would not allege that those defendants were criminally liable as participants, either primary or secondary, in the planned attack on the London Stock Exchange, and would not allege that any defendant was party to a plan to carry out any other attack in the UK in the immediate future. It has emerged in the course of this hearing that both Nazam Hussain and Usman Khan agree that they intended to travel to the Madrassa in January 2011.

20. The Crown’s position was that these three defendants were part of the group of 9 formed in October 2010 to decide how best to further the Jihadist cause including planning for acts of terrorism. Meetings on the 7th November and 12th December were intended to further this and were conducted within Section 5. Different proposals were considered, but in the event two plans emerged, the attack on the Stock Exchange and the plan of the Stoke defendants identified in their basis of plea. Each part of the group was aware of the plan of the other and the matters were discussed freely. The group continued to function until the arrests as a forum for discussion of possible courses of action. The Crown accepted that Mohammed Shahjahan did not intend to travel to the Madassa to train. The Crown contended that these defendants contemplated that some of those trained would commit their acts of terrorism abroad but that others might return to the UK and commit them here but accepted that nothing had been agreed as to timetable, target or method. Further the Crown accepted that, after going to Kashmir, experiences there might mean that no such activity would have actually taken place in the UK.

21. Two defendants Mohammed Chowdhury and Shah Rahman sought a Goodyear direction on the basis of a draft count 10 and they were supported in this request by the Crown. Having been given an indication as requested on the morning of 31st January, some hours later, first Mohammed Chowdhury and Shah Rahman and then Desai and Miah pleaded guilty to the new count 10 which particularises the Section 5 offence in the following terms: “Between the 1st day of November and 21st day of December 2010 with the intention of committing an act of terrorism, engaged in conduct in preparation for giving effect to that intention namely preparing to produce and detonate an explosive device in the London Stock Exchange”. The basis of plea for Mohammed Chowdhury included the following: “There was a plan to place a live explosive device of a type that was capable of causing death or serious injury in the Stock Exchange in London. The intention was that it should be exploded but not that it should cause death or serious injury. The intention was that it should cause terror, property damage and economic damage. It was, however, a clear risk that it would in fact cause death or serious injury. It was the intention that this plan would be carried out in the near future but at the time of arrest no materials had been obtained with a view to constructing an explosive device nor had any firm date been set for carrying it out. Meetings and discussions relied on by the prosecution were in part in furtherance of this plan. Various other projects were also considered during this time. The role of Mohammed Chowdhury was as the lynchpin of the group playing a significant role in the researching and selection of the target and researching the construction of a device on 19th December 2010 by reading Inspire 1”.

22. Shah Rahman’s written basis of plea was that early discussions on the 28th November identified the objective of causing economic damage and disruption. In due course he became party to a plan with Chowdhury to place a live explosive device in the Stock Exchange in London. The intention was that it should be exploded, but not cause death or serious injury, but that it should cause terror, disruption and financial damage. However, there was a clear risk that it would cause death or serious injury. He and Chowdhury were involved in target selection and the planning for the construction of a device on 19th December, when both researched the construction of a device by reading Inspire 1.

23. Abdul Miah’s written basis plea repeats the same elements but says his role was limited to discussing the plan and carrying out research on the London Stock Exchange. Desai’s written basis of plea was essentially the same though he stated that he was party to a plan to place an explosive device in a toilet in the London Stock Exchange of a kind capable of causing death or serious injury.

24. The Crown accepted and agreed those bases of plea but reserved the right to refer to the wider spectrum of discussions as placing the events the subject of that new count and the agreed basis of plea into context.

25. Count 12 is the final Section 5 count and concerns Omar Latif only. The particulars are that between the 1st November 2010 and 21st December 2010, with the intention of assisting others to commit an act of terrorism, he engaged in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism by travelling to and attending meetings on 7th November and 12th December 2010. The written basis of plea records that on the 7th November he arrived at the meeting late and left on a number of occasions, returning to central Cardiff by car. He was not present for much of the time the others were together. He attended the meeting of the 12th December, being driven there by car by Abdul Miah. He was aware that conversations concerning terrorist activity were likely to take place and such conversations did take place. He did not participate in the development of any plans of a terrorist nature, including those relating to the Stock Exchange or terrorist training in Pakistan.

26. Finally, Count 11 is an offence of possession of an article for a terrorist purpose contrary to section 57 of the Terrorism Act 2000. The particulars are that on the 20th December Mohibur Rahman was in possession of articles, namely Inspire magazine Summer and Fall 2010, in circumstances which gave rise to a reasonable suspicion that their possession was for a purpose connected with a commission, preparation or instigation of an act of terrorism. His written basis of plea is that he had in his possession Inspire magazine summer 2010 recovered from a hard drive. He had been in possession of it since 15th October. It was last accessed on the 16th October and was never shared with any of his co-defendants or any other 3rd party. Second, he had in his possession Inspire magazine Fall 2010 recovered from the same hard drive. He had been in possession of that publication since 25th September. It was last accessed on the 16th October. He had never shared that with any of his codefendants or any other 3rd party.

Dangerousness

27. It is common ground that both the Section 5 offences and the offence under Section 57 of the 2000 Act are specified offences and that they are serious offences for the purposes of Section 224 of the 2003 Criminal Justice Act. In order for an offender to be dangerous I have, in addition, to be of the opinion that there is a significant risk to members of the public of serious harm occasioned by the commission by the offender of further specified offences. I have regard to the fact that, in their defence statements, none of these defendants resiled from any of the views which they have held. Some of them, notably Chowdhury, Shah Rahman, Usman Khan, Shahjahan and Nazam Hussain have written to me that they now repent of those views and Desai has, through his counsel, expressed the wish to go on a deradicalisation programme whilst in custody. That is welcome, but the sincerity or long term nature of that stated contrition is more relevant for those who will have to manage their sentences than for me in passing them. I also have regard to the fact that, though each one of them, other than Mohibur Rahman, has pleaded guilty to a Section 5 offence on a specific basis, I also have to have regard to all the other surrounding circumstances whereby it is clear that their discussions related not just to a single imminent incident at the London Stock Exchange, but also to a range of possible types of attack and targets, as well as to the plans of the three Stoke offenders to engage in long term plans to finance, construct and operate a terrorist military training facility, to recruit trainees to receive training and, in the cases of Usman Khan and Nazam Hussain, to avail themselves of that training. I am satisfied that, in the cases of each of the offenders who have pleaded guilty to a section 5 offence there is such a significant risk as triggers the dangerousness provisions. That includes Omar Latif. He attended both the meetings of the group of 9 and was regarded as a member of the Cardiff group. I am satisfied that this would not have been the case had he not shared the core intentions of the group that each geographical group, whether on its own or in combination with another, would prepare to engage in some form of violent terrorism,. As such I am satisfied that he poses the necessary risk for him to be regarded as dangerous. In addition, as the terms of imprisonment I am minded to impose on each of these 8 would be at least 4 years, I am satisfied that all the statutory requirements of dangerousness are met for each of them.

28. Dangerousness in their cases having been established, I have to consider whether, in each case, an indeterminate sentence of imprisonment for public protection or a determinate or an extended, sentence would be the appropriate disposal in the light of my finding that each offender poses a significant risk of serious harm to the public. I remind myself of the decision of the Court of Appeal in C, [2009] 1 WLR 2158 CA, where the Court of Appeal said that a court may only impose an indeterminate sentence if satisfied that the risk to the public would not be adequately protected by a determinate sentence with an extended licence period under Section 227. I also remind myself that, in the case of a conviction for a terrorism offence there are now strict requirements that an offender keep the police notified of various personal details, including address, or change of name, travel plans for a period of 30 years, where the sentence is 10 years or more, or 15 years when the sentence is between 5 – 10 years or 10 years when the term of imprisonment is under 5 years. (The Counter Terrorism Act 2008) I also remind myself that in the most serious of the cases to which I have been referred as relevant for the purpose of sentencing namely Jalil and others [2009] 2 CR. App. R. (S) 40 and Karim [2011] EWCA Crim 2577, where the terrorist activity involved, or potentially involved, was described as about as grave as it could be, the trial judges imposed, without any appellate criticism, extended sentences rather than an indeterminate sentence which, in each case, was available, under the CJA 2003 regime in Karim and its predecessor in the case of Jalil.

29. I have in each case to consider the nature and extent of the risk posed, in the light of the offence of which the offender is guilty and I have to consider the extent to which the public may be adequately protected by the conditions of licence in the event that, at a fixed point, the offender would be released from prison and fall to serve the rest of his sentence being supervised in the community, though at risk of return to prison to serve its entirety if he were to break his conditions of licence or commit a further offence of any sort..

30. I have reached different conclusions in respect of Shahjahan, Usman Khan and Nazam Hussain to that which I have reached in respect of the other 5.

31. In the case of those three, in my judgment, the nature of the offending and the nature of the commitment of the offenders to long term terrorist aims is different to that of the other 5. They were about the long term business of establishing and operating a terrorist military training facility in Pakistan, on land owned by the family of Usman Khan to which British recruits whom, they would recruit, would go to receive training. Usman Khan and Nazam Hussain were to obtain that training and were, thereafter, to obtain first hand terrorist experience in Kashmir. Furthermore it was envisaged by them all that ultimately they, and the other recruits may return to the UK as trained and experienced terrorists available to perform terrorist attacks in this country, on one possibility contemplated, in the context of the return of British troops from Afghanistan. These three were happy to engage with the other groups, whom they knew were intending, in the short term, to commit terrorist attacks in the United Kingdom. They contemplated, however briefly, such an attack themselves but it is clear that their focus was not distracted by that from the serious long term plan to which I have referred.

32. It is also clear from conversations they had on 12th December, and from the structure document prepared by Shahjahan, that these three judged themselves to be operating at a higher level of efficacy and commitment than the rest, save that they expressed some admiration for Miah and Desai. They thought it proper that Shahjahan should be addressed as “ameer” by Miah. In my judgment it is proper to infer that they regarded themselves as more serious jihadis than the others. In my judgment, having considered the evidence, that was a conclusion they were entitled to reach. In my judgment they are more serious jihadis than the others. They were working to a long term agenda, no less deadly in its potential than the potential for damage and injury the subject of the short term intentions of the others. They were intent on obtaining training for themselves and others whom they would recruit and, as such, were working to a more ambitious and more serious jihadist agenda. In my judgment, these offenders would remain, even after a lengthy term of imprisonment, of such a significant risk that the public could not be adequately protected by their being managed on licence in the community, subject to conditions, by reference to a preordained release date. In my judgment the safety of the public in respect of these offenders can only adequately be protected if their release on licence is decided upon, at the earliest, at the conclusion of the minimum term which I fix today

33. I have formed the conclusion that the cases of the other 5 do not require an IPP but that they may be managed adequately upon release within the community at a point in their sentence fixed by me today. As with all determinate sentences Parliament has provided a means of managing risk which involves the offender being released after half his sentence has been served, having being given credit for time on remand. Upon release, however, and particularly in terrorist cases, that release is subject to the most stringent conditions. First, there are the onerous notification requirements to which I have already referred which will run for 30 years. Second, and for the lengthy period to be identified in the extended sentence, the offender must serve the sentence in the community subject to the most onerous of licence conditions. They will, inevitably, include a requirement of residence, a curfew, and may well include restrictions on activities, restrictions on movement, restrictions on contacts and other conditions designed to manage the threat they pose. The approach to the imposition of conditions and their policing will be multi agency based and will include the involvement of the security services, whose efficacy in monitoring and controlling these offenders has already been admirably demonstrated.

34. In my judgment it is unrealistic to suppose, and the crown does not seek to persuade me, that any of these 5 has shown any sign of having a long term or strategic perspective so as not to be capable of being adequately monitored and controlled by the agencies to whom I have already referred. It is clear that they were determined to carry out some high profile violent terrorist action even though untrained and, in effect, complete novices and without any meaningful consideration of how they might avoid the security at their chosen target to make good their attack. Chowdhury is a compulsive self publicist and is incapable of masking his true intentions. Shah Rahman failed to impress even the Cardiff members of the group to the extent that he was not invited to the 12th December meeting and, in fact, on that same day, drew attention to himself by committing a minor, jihadist inspired, public order offence. Miah, though criminally experienced, has singularly failed on many occasions to conceal his wrong doing, resulting in a series of criminal convictions and Desai, his brother, it is agreed by all and from a proper study of the product of the probes, is very much subordinate to his brother Miah. Latif’s involvement does not come close to requiring an IPP.

35. I have, in considering IPP, had regard to the relative youth of Usman Khan but, in my judgment, having had regard to all the evidence I remain of the view that for him, despite his youth, a sentence of IPP is necessary.

36. I have also had regard to the fact that the Stoke 3 had come to the attention of the authorities by virtue of their da’wah activities. It is, however, their ability to act on a strategic level and to consider the long term at the price of eschewing immediate spontaneous action that persuades me that the risk they pose is so significant that it can only be adequately met by an IPP.

37. Mohibur Rahman has pleaded guilty to an offence under section 57 of the 2000 Act. Although it is a specified offence no case has been cited to me in which a finding of dangerousness has been made in respect of such an offence. In light of the basis of plea which is accepted by the crown, even taking into account the context, to which I will return later, I am not satisfied that the statutory requirements for dangerousness are made out in his case. Accordingly the sentence on him will be a determinate sentence.

Discount for a Plea of Guilty

38. As with all defendants who plead guilty they are entitled to a discount in sentence for having done so. In most cases a plea of guilty on the outset of the trial results in a discount against sentence of the order of 10%. This is a trial of unusual complexity and length. Had it fought it was estimated that it could have lasted up to 5 months at huge further public expense. Furthermore, the offences to which these defendants have now pleaded guilty are very serious and, by pleading guilty, each offender has exposed himself to a lengthy prison sentence. Having regard to these factors, in my judgment the appropriate discount for a plea of guilty in this case is of the order of 20%. I observe that in the case of Jalil the pleas of guilty at the commencement of the trial in the circumstances of that case, attracted discounts of between 15% and 20%.

Determination of Length of Sentence.

Introduction

39. The Crown submits, and I accept, that sentencing in respect of the Section 5 offences is highly fact specific and that there is only a limited number of cases from which guidance by way of useful comparison can be obtained.

40. Of those cited to me in my judgment there are three which are particularly salient. The first is Jalil and others [2008] EWCA Crim 29 10 where there was a plea of guilty to conspiring to cause explosions of a nature likely to endanger life. The highest of the sentences imposed in that case was, in the judgment of the Court of Appeal, based on a sentence, after a trial, of just over 30 years.

41. The conspiracy in that case was of 4 years duration. It involved, at one stage, detailed written descriptions and plans for the destruction of the buildings of 4 key American financial institutions, prepared for the consideration of the Al Qaeda leadership, in the form of a professional or corporate presentation. It also involved plans for similar attacks on British targets and involved detailed proposals of several different possible methods of destruction. One involved packing stretch limousines with propane gas cylinders and explosives and detonating them in the underground car parks beneath target buildings. Other proposals were for a dirty, or radioactive, bomb using many thousands of an item of domestic equipment containing some radioactive material. The plan also involved the sabotage of a major rail artery, perhaps in a tunnel under the River Thames, and the hi-jacking of a petrol tanker for use to ram a building. The plan was for all or some of those attacks to be synchronised on the same day. The Court of Appeal, in upholding the sentences, said, amongst other things, that the potential for mass injury and loss of life was very substantial. It involved projected attacks on different buildings in urban places and radioactivity as well as explosions.

42. The second is Karim [2011] EWCA Crim 2577. In that case the offender received a total of 30 years imprisonment for the commission of a number of offences pursuant to Section 5. The most serious of those offences were contested, so the offender did not have the benefit of a plea of guilty. He was a graduate in electronics and micro-electronic systems, having graduated from an English university in 2002. By that stage he had been involved for a couple of years in a fundamentalist grouping. By the end of 2006 he came to this country to live and work and, by that time, had formed the view that Jihad involved an obligation to commit offensive actions against unbelievers. He had been offered various employment positions but had opted to be employed by British Airways as a graduate trainee and from then, until his arrest, for a period of 3 years and 3 months, he worked incessantly to further terrorist purposes whilst managing to keep his real opinions concealed behind a quiet and unobtrusive lifestyle, such concealment involving heavily encrypted email correspondence. In the course of those activities he was in direct contact with Anwar Al Awlaki and made three specific proposals to him for ways in which he could, himself or with the assistance of others, commit a terrorist attack. First a physical attack on BA’s IT servers which would cause huge financial loss and jeopardise its very existence. Second, an electronic attack to disable BA’s IT and cause, at least, a temporary cessation of operations, the cost being estimated at £20 million a day. Third, getting a bomb on board a plane bound for the US. Al Awlaki responded to this by discouraging an electronic attack for fear of blowing his cover, but Al Awlaki told him to explore the idea of the bomb. All the offender needed was the go ahead from Al Awlaki himself to act on his intentions. The learned sentencing Judge described the aggravating features of the 3 counts of which he was convicted as being: his direct contact with Al Awlaki and the nature of the proposals put forward by him, some of which were, as he described, about as grave as can be imagined and that, taken together, were matters of the utmost gravity.

43. At the other end of the spectrum, in the case Tabbakh [2009] EWCA Crim 464, the offender received a sentence, after a trial and a conviction, which was based on a starting point of 8 years. The offender had compiled a set of bomb making instructions and had gone some way towards assembling the ingredients. He had not yet succeeded, in part because the ingredients, though of the right substances, were of poor grade and because he had yet to make, or obtain, a detonator, though reference to electric wires were contained in the diagrams he had prepared.

44. The offender was 39 years of age and had no previous convictions. The Court concluded that, for an offender, doing his best to make a bomb in this country with a view to a terrorist act, but which was, as yet, not viable for want of a detonator and the right grade of ingredients, a sentence of 8 years was not outside the range available to the Judge.

Comparing the seriousness of Counts 9 and 10.

45. Counsel for the three Stoke offenders have urged on me that the count 9 offence is not as serious as the count 10 offence. It does not involve any intention in the short term to make any violent attack in the UK. It is focussed on fundraising and the providing, or obtaining, of training, the primary aim of those trained being to operate in Kashmir. They have pointed out that there are specific statutory offences concerning fundraising, and the provision, or obtaining, of terrorist training which could have been charged on the admitted conduct and which carry maximum sentences of the order of 10 or 15 years imprisonment, and reflected in lower sentences passed by the courts for those guilty of such offences.

46. The crown says that counts 9 and 10 are of equal seriousness. They are different because they reflect different conduct. Whereas the conduct alleged in count 10 is very serious and immediate in its potential impact, the conduct alleged in count 9 is also very serious and reflects a long term and calculated threat to the UK and elsewhere.

47. In my judgment the crown is right so to characterise these offences as of equal seriousness. The crown has obtained pleas of guilty to section 5, not to specific lesser statutory offences. The particulars of count 9 place at the forefront attendance at the operational meetings of the group on more than one occasion. I have already indicated that the crown has emphasised the involvement of the Stoke three in the larger group, in its free discussion of the plans of all of them, including plans for immediate terrorist action in the UK and its continuing function for discussion of possible course of action. I have already referred to the fact that, within the Stoke group, there was some consideration of a violent terrorist attack by way of bombing certain pubs in the UK. In my judgment it would be artificial to separate off the madrassa project from the gravamen of the section 5 charge namely planning and intending to pursue that project from within and with the support of the larger group which was coalescing and of which I am satisfied there was an emerging structure with the Stoke offenders in the pre-eminent position.

48. Accordingly I will determine the length of sentence for each of counts 9 and 10 on the footing that they are of equal seriousness and that the individual levels of sentence must reflect the positions of the offender within and across the three groups.

Count 9

49. The conduct particularised in this count is that, with the intention of committing an act or acts of terrorism or assisting others to do so, the three offenders engaged in conduct in preparation to give effect to that intention namely attending operational meetings, fund raising for terrorist training, preparing to travel abroad, or assisting others to travel abroad to engage in training for acts of terrorism.

50. The written basis of plea is that they were fund raising to build a Madrassa next to an already existing Mosque in Kashmir in Pakistan. The plan was to make that Madrassa available for men who would be fighting to bring Sharia to that region. Such people would receive firearms training at the Madrassa. It is now clear that the plan would involve Usman Khan and Nazam Hussain attending the Madrassa from early January for that purpose.

51. The Crown’s position, which I accept, is that, whilst the Madrassa was in the early stages of construction, terrorist training there was already possible. The Crown accepts that Shahjahan did not intent to travel to train but that Usman Khan and Nazam Hussain did as they were about to travel to Pakistan. Further, although it was contemplated that some of those trained would commit their acts of terrorism abroad, none the less, it was also contemplated others might return to the UK and commit them in the UK though in the light of experiences in Kashmir this might not have actually occurred.

52. It is clear to me from the conversations within the group that Shahjahan was the leader, not only of the Stoke group, but was recognised by his own, and the other, groups as the leader of the larger group and to whom members of the other components deferred as “ameer”. It is also clear that the Stoke group saw itself as pre-eminent. Shahjahan regarded the three Stoke offenders as almost on a par with him.

53. It is clear to me that Usman Kahn and Nazan Hussain were to attend the Madrassa and were themselves keen to perform acts of terrorism in Kashmir and that it was envisaged that when they and others, who had been recruited, had also trained in the Madrassa and had experience in Kashmir, they may return to the UK and perform acts of violent terrorism here. The long, monitored, discussions of Usman Khan about the madrassa and his attitudes towards it and terrorism are highly eloquent of the seriousness of their purpose. It is clear that this was a serious, long term, venture in terrorism the purpose of which was to establish and manage a terrorist training facility at the Madrassa, to fundraise for its construction and operation by the use of various means, including fraud, and to recruit young British Muslims to go there and train, thereafter being available to commit terrorism abroad and at home. Added to this is the dimension of all of this being the subject of discussion at, and their participation in, the larger group in which they were pre-eminent and of which Shahjahan was regarded as the ameer.

Mohammed Shahjahan

54. I have already indicated that in my judgment this offence is on the same level of seriousness as count 10. Placing it within the range of sentences in the cases to which I have already referred, in my judgment the starting point for Shahjahan as the leader of the Stoke group, which was the lead group of the three, is 22 years after a trial. In his case, whilst his previous convictions are relevant showing a disposition to commit serious crime, I do not regard them as an aggravating factor. Applying a 20 % discount for a guilty plea the determinate sentence would be 17 years 8 months. I am sentencing him to an IPP so I must fix a minimum term which is 50% of that sentence. Accordingly he will not be considered for release on licence until 8 years 10 months have elapsed less days served on remand.

Usman Khan

55. In the case of Usman Khan, in my judgment he was marginally more central to the project than Nazam Hussain and marginally below Shahjahan. In addition, I must make a small reduction to reflect his youth. This results in a sentence after a trial of 20 years from which must be deducted 4 years as a discount for his plea of guilty. Thus the determinate sentence for him would be 16 years. I am imposing an IPP upon him and must fix the minimum term before which his release on licence cannot be considered. That is one half of the notional determinate sentence namely 8 years less time served on remand.

Nazam Hussain

56. In the case of Nazam Hussain, in my judgment the starting point having regard to his place in the hierarchy, but without any reduction on the ground of his age, is 20 years after a trial. As with Usman Khan he is entitled to a 20% discount for his guilty plea. Thus the notional determinate sentence is 16 years. I have to fix a minimum term for him before which he may not be considered for release on licence from this sentence of IPP. That will be 8 years less time served on remand.

Count 10

57. It is a fundamental principle that a Court, in sentencing an offender, following a guilty plea, may only sentence him for the conduct of which he has pleaded guilty. Count 10 particularises the offence as “preparing to produce and detonate an explosive device in the London Stock Exchange”. The Crown, in opening the case, accepted that the device was to be a pipe bomb and that it was to be exploded in a toilet in the London Stock Exchange. The Crown also accept the offenders’ bases of plea that it was not their intention to cause death or serious injury but that it was their intention to cause terror, property damage and economic damage. The offenders also accept that they were reckless as to whether it would in fact cause death or serious injury.

58. The written basis of plea also accepts that it was the intention of the offenders that the plan would be carried out in the near future. There is no dispute but that, in the course of conversations and discussions relied on by the Crown, other projects of a similar nature were being considered but that only this one had reached the stage that there was an intention to commit it and work of preparation had commenced. In effect the others had been abandoned as impracticable ( the letter bombs) or had never been considered beyond being mentioned in passing.

59. Whilst it is true that no materials had yet been obtained with a view to constructing the explosive device, and that no firm date had been set, the ingredients for such a device are simple and easily obtainable and, although the device requires some dexterity to construct, it does not require any expert knowledge or training other than basic manual dexterity and a familiarisation with basic electronic principles.

60. The Crown points out that this is the first case in which a case falls for sentencing where the involvement of Al Qaeda is in the form of inspiring the offenders through the medium of Inspire magazine. These offenders have no training. Their involvement in violent terrorism, it seems, is limited to a few weeks. They are, in effect, “lone wolf” terrorists, operating alone or in small groups without direct contact with, or logistical support from, Al Qaeda centre. The information provided on line by Al Qaeda is designed so as to be used by such untrained people. This reduces the potency of the device involved but also reduces the chances of detection and increases the chances of success. The device in question is designed to be made within a few hours and with the use of little skill, using materials that can be acquired without suspicion and must, to achieve its terrorising purpose, be capable of causing death. In order to have impact, a relatively small device such as this, must be placed in a high profile target and that was what was planned here.

61. The Crown acknowledges that inevitably, with this new Al Quaeda tactic, this plan lacks the usual features of a serious terrorist plot that is, large, complex bombs, involvement in an established terrorist organisation, complex advanced planning. This is of necessity, because spontaneity and practicality are part of the new tactic.

62. I have, therefore, to attempt to place sentence for this particular offence at a point on a spectrum which runs from 30 years (Karim & Jalil) to as low as 8 (Tabbakh). I have to have regard to the fact that these offenders were only engaged in discussing and planning for terrorist activities for a relatively brief period before the security forces intervened and that they intended to plant a small explosive device, with lethal potentiality, in a toilet at the London Stock Exchange, a high profile target chosen to maximise the terrorising effect and economic impact. I also have to have regard to the fact that none of the offenders are trained and were, in fact, novices who had not devised or, apparently, considered any strategy to gain entry to the London Stock Exchange with the device.

63. On the other hand I have to reflect the fact that they were determined to embark on violent terrorist action and had given serious consideration to a number of options before homing in on this one. They had deliberately chosen a high profile target and they were reckless as to the damage and/or death and or injury which might be caused. They were responding to a specific new tactic being deployed by Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsular and were steeped in the philosophy of that organisation.

64. In my judgment, for all these reasons this offence is not as grave as the offences in Jalil and Karim. But is of a different order of seriousness to that of Tabbakh.

Abdul Miah

65. In formal terms, Abdul Miah was the leader of the Cardiff group and so, in the structure chart, put on a par with Chowdhury. However, it is clear to me, as it was to the Stoke group, that he was a more serious jihadi than Chowdhury. It is clear from his contribution to discussions on 28th November, and on other occasions, that he was, by virtue of his maturity, criminal nowse and experience, and personality, the one who was setting the agenda and applying an analytical mind to the feasibility of the various projects being discussed. He also took the lead in discussing fundraising by use of frauds which particularly impressed the Stoke group. He was also advising the others on security with his own experience to the fore and was their spokesman when dealing, on 28th November, with a third party. In addition, it is clear that, by the 12th December, he had impressed the Stoke contingent with his seriousness and capabilities as a jihadi and he had already mastered the elements of making the pipe bomb. Abdul Miah is a man of previous convictions. He has a number of convictions and has served a significant custodial sentence. Some of his convictions evidence him as a person with an inclination towards violence towards people, notably his convictions in respect of noxious gases and false imprisonment. In addition he has a recent conviction for fraud which is apposite to his contributions to discussions about fundraising using fraud. Those previous convictions, in my judgment, constitute a significant aggravating element. Having regard to all of these matters, in my judgment, the appropriate starting point after a trial for this offender is one of 21 years imprisonment. From that must be deducted 4.2 years in respect of a discount for his plea of guilty. This results in a sentence of 16 years and 10 months to which will be added a 5 year extended term. Accordingly, the sentence I pass is an extended sentence of 21 years and 10 months of which the custodial element is 16 years and 10 months.

Mohammed Chowdhury

66. He was 20 years old at the time of this offence of no previous conviction. He was however, he accepts, the lynchpin, bringing the groups together and arranging for the meetings in Cardiff and Newport. He was one of the four who discussed, on the 28th November, and eventually fixed on, this particular act and he was taking the lead on 19th December in explaining and going through the Inspire article with Shah Rahman. After a trial and giving him a small discount for his youth in comparison to the others a sentence of 17 years would have, in my judgment, been appropriate given his role and position within the London group and across the three groups. Giving him credit for his guilty plea of 20%. a sentence of 13 years and eight months would, in my judgment, be appropriate. However, in view of my assessment of him as dangerous, the sentence I pass upon him is an extended sentence of 18 years 8 months, of which the custodial sentence element is 13 years 8 months.

Shah Rahman

67. I take into account that Shah Rahman is accepted as not being the leader of the London element of this group. Nor does his minor offence, committed during the time of this indictment, aggravate his guilt His involvement was less prominent than that of Chowdhury and it was clear that he was a follower, not a prime mover, when they were together on the 28th November, and when they were discussing recipes on the 19th December. To reflect that element, in my judgment the starting point for him is 15 years after a trial. Giving him a discount for his plea of guilty the sentence I would have passed, but for the issue of dangerousness, is one of 12 years imprisonment, to which I add an extended sentence element of 5 years. Accordingly, the sentence on him is an extended prison sentence of 17 years of which the custodial sentence element is 12 years.

Gurukanth Desai

68. It is agreed that Desai is not a leader of the Cardiff group. He played a subordinate role in that group. He has previous convictions but they are long ago and trivial and so I do not regard hem as an aggravating feature. His contribution is, in my judgment, no greater than that of Shah Rahman. In his case the starting point after a trial would be a sentence of 15 years which, giving a discount for his plea of guilty, reduces to 12 years, added to which must be a 5 year extended term which results in his case in an extended sentence of 17 years of which the custodial element will be 12 years.

Count 12

Omar Latif

69. The particulars of this count are that Omar Latif, with the intention of assisting others to commit an act of terrorism, engaged in conduct in preparation for an act of terrorism by travelling to and attending meetings on 7th November and 12th December.

70. I have already referred to his basis of plea. He was present at those meetings. He was aware that conversations concerning terrorist activity were likely to take place and that such conversations did. But he did not participate in the development of any plans of a terrorist nature including those relating to the Stock Exchange or terrorist training in Pakistan.

71. In my judgment, the gravamen of the offence committed by Latif is that on more than one occasion he travelled to and attended such meetings well knowing the nature of the conversations to take place. That is to say, their wide ranging nature, the number of possible terrorist activities which would be discussed and the intention of their participants that they would crystallise into a plan or plans to carry out at least one, if not more, terrorist acts of the type of severity being discussed.

72. Whilst his conduct with the intention of assisting others to commit an act of terrorism did not involve participation in the planning of or development of either of the plans which crystallised during those and other meetings, none the less, by his presence at those meetings, he was contributing by encouraging the others to form the intention to commit those terrorist acts and to prepare for them. As such, I accept that his culpability is not as great as theirs. But, he was a trusted member of what was, to an extent, a self consciously exclusive group who, by his plea to count 12, shared their intention that an act or acts of terrorism should be planned and prepared. I do not accept that the authorities he relies on are, save for Tabbakh, to which I have already referred, relevant to this case. The gravamen of this case is the operation of the group and his membership of it even though to a limited extent.

73. In my judgment, therefore, and in the particular context of this case, the starting point for Omar Latif is a sentence of 13 years imprisonment which, after a discount for his plea of guilty, results in a custodial term of 10 years and 4 months to which must be added a 5 year extended term giving a total extended sentence of 15 years 4 months of which the custodial term element is 10 years 4 months.

Count 11

Mohibur Rahman

74. This charges Mohibur Rahman that on the 20th December 2010 he was in possession of articles: namely Inspire magazine Summer and Fall 2010, in circumstances which gave rise to a reasonable suspicion that their possession was for a purpose connected with the commission, preparation or instigation of an act of terrorism. His plea of guilty is on the basis that he did indeed have these magazines on a hard drive in his possession for several months since September 2010, though they were not accessed on that hard drive after the 16th October 2010. The Crown say that this possession by him of these articles must be seen in the context of his attendance at the Cardiff meeting on the 7th November along with the other Stoke defendants, his being referred to by other defendants at the 12th December meeting, though he was not present, and his presence in discussions about a pub bomb on the 14th December with Usman Khan and Shahjahan, though no plan in respect of that discussions ever crystallised.

75. The potency of these two magazines, which were on his hard drive, is best illustrated by the direct use to which the London and Cardiff offenders put it in respect of Count 10.. The prosecution say that the context of his, albeit limited, involvement in the group makes the possession of such articles all the more significant and serious.

76. The maximum sentence for the Section 57 offence is now 15 years having been raised from 10 years in 2006. There have been a number decisions of the CACD in connection with this offence to which I have been referred, though in this area of offending cases are highly fact specific.

77. In my judgment the commission of this offence by this offender, in the context of the activities of this group and his connections with it, places his offence at a significant level of seriousness. Had there been a trial and he been convicted the appropriate sentence would have been one of 6 1/2 years imprisonment. Giving credit of 20% for his plea of guilty, that sentence is reduced to one of 5 years.

78. I do not accept the argument that he was pleading guilty to a new allegation so as to attract a greater discount for a plea of guilty. The allegation was already on the indictment in the form of count 8, a section 58 offence. He never offered to plead guilty to that offence. His late plea to the same facts recast as a section 57 offence cannot, in my judgment, constitute a plea of guilty at the first available opportunity. In his case he will be released after he has served half of that term less time served on remand and for the balance of the sentence will be at risk of recall if he were to breach he terms of his licence or were to commit a further offence.

79. Finally I have considered all the personal mitigation and references urged on me. I am afraid that in this case they are very marginal to my task and none of it has affected my sentences to any significant degree.

SUMMARY:

MOHAMMED SHAHJAHAN: Imprisonment for Public Protection. Minimum term 8 years 10 months less 408 days on remand. Terrorism notification period 30 years.

USMAN KHAN : Imprisonment for Public Protection. Minimum term 8 years less 408 days on remand. Terrorism notification period 30 years

NAZAM HUSSAIN: Imprisonment for Public Protection. Minimum term 8 years less 408 days on remand. Terrorism notification period 30 years.

ABDUL MIAH: extended prison sentence 21 years 10 months. Custodial element 16 years 10 months. Time spent on remand 408 days. Terrorism notification period 30 years

MOHAMMED CHOWDHURY: extended prison sentence 18 years 8 months. Custodial element 13 years 8 months. Time spent on remand 408 days. Terrorism notification period 30 years

SHAH RAHMAN: extended prison sentence 17 years. Custodial element 12 years. Time spent on remand 408 days. Terrorism notification period 30 years

GURUKANTH DESAI: extended prison sentence 17 years. Custodial element 12 years. Time spent on remand 408 days. Terrorism notification period 30 years

OMAR LATIF: extended prison sentence 15 years 4 months. Custodial element 10 years 4 months. Time spent on remand 408 days. Terrorism notification period 30 years

MOHIBUR RAHMAN: prison sentence of 5 years. Time spent on remand 408 days. Terrorism notification period 15 years

In each case an order for forfeiture under s 143 of the powers of the Criminal Court (Sentencing) Act 2000 in respect of the exhibits set out in the schedule appended to the prosecution note of 8th February 2012.

*

Quote:
Anyone who knows anything about IPP sentences knows that unless these guys "change their ways" and have access to the courses should they even wish to change their ways, that it's probably unlikely that they will ever be released as the Criminal Justice Act 2003 provides the mechanism for them to be detained indefinitely ...

Another wonderful New Labour legacy ...



.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Second, he had in his possession Inspire magazine Fall 2010 recovered from the same hard drive. He had been in possession of that publication since 25th September.


Erm, sorry Judge but if you mean 25th September 2010 which I'm sure you do, given that they were arrested in December 2010, then that evidential claim just ain't possible.


And besides, my date calculator, says "No !" ...

The 2nd issue of the alleged AQAP fly trap magazine, Inspire, Issue 2 or "Fall 2010" wasn't even "published" on t'interwebs until 11th October 2010 !

Someone's got their "evidence" mixed up here.

The Issue 2 PDF creation date is surely 25 September 2010, but it was not released, or "intercepted" by the usual suspects, until 11th October 2010.

See here and here


Quote:
publicintelligence.net

Second Update: A second issue of Inspire is available as of October 11, 2010



Quote:
Stanford University

In the second issue the English-language magazine of AQAP, Inspire, published October 11, 2010, ...



Even MEMRI agrees:

Quote:
On October 11, 2010, Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) released its second issue of its English-language magazine Inspire. Among the topics presented is an interview with Abu Sufyan Al-Azdi (aka Sa'id Al-Shihri), an article by American Al-Qaeda spokesman Adam Gadahn titled "Legitimate Demands 2," and two articles by Anwar Al-Awlaki.



We are all very well aware of the fantastic nature of Mi5's business vis "terrorists", but time travel has, hitherto, gone unnoticed, even within their rather expensive imaginations ...

I've also no doubt that counsel forensically examined each piece of "evidence" before advising his clients ... and that the Judge could of course rely on and be confident that the information provided to him was ahem, accurate ...

No need to test any of this so called "evidence" though is there ...

without a trial ...

While you're checking that out, maybe you could also provide some evidence that these "internet resources" actually emanate from Yemen based terrorists, because I'm sure you wouldn't want such serious Judicial assumptions to be made on the basis of some potentially dubious and prejudiced tribal claims made by private companies in the good old US of A now would you ?


I can put on a wig and robes and charge £2000 per hour too - took me about 5 minutes ....

Beyond pathetic.

It'll be an administrative typo no doubt ...

"Goodyear" omelettes all round then ...



.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Mr Justice Wilkie

...such concealment involving heavily encrypted email correspondence.


BA jihadist relied on Jesus-era encryption

30 years for airline bomb plot

By Team Register

Posted in Crime, 22nd March 2011 11:52 GMT

An IT worker from British Airways jailed for 30 years for terrorism offences used encryption techniques that pre-date the birth of Jesus.

Rajib Karim, 31, from Newcastle, was found guilty of attempting to use his job at BA to plot a terrorist attack at the behest of Yemen-based radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, a leader of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsular.

Sentencing him at Woolwich Crown Court last week, Justice Calvert-Smith described Karim as a "committed jihadist" who responded "enthusiastically" towards plans to smuggle a bomb onto a plane or damage BA's IT systems.

Justice Calvert-Smith praised police for being able to decipher incriminating documents under "five or more layers of protection", the Daily Telegraph reports.

However, claims by the prosecution that the coding and encryption systems were the most sophisticated ever seen in use were overstated – by more than 2,000 years.

Woolwich Crown Court was told that Bangladeshi Islamic activists who were in touch with Karim had rejected the use of common modern systems such as PGP or TrueCrypt in favour of a system which used Excel transposition tables, which they had invented themselves.

But the underlying code system they used predated Excel by two millennia. The single-letter substitution cipher they used was invented by the ancient Greeks and had been used and described by Julius Caesar in 55BC.

Karim, an IT specialist, had used PGP, but for storage only.

Despite urging by the Yemen-based al Qaida leader Anwar Al Anlaki, Karim also rejected the use of a sophisticated code program called "Mujhaddin Secrets", which implements all the AES candidate cyphers, "because 'kaffirs', or non-believers, know about it so it must be less secure".

The majority of the communications that formed the basis of the case against Karim, which claimed to warn of a possible terrorist plot in the making, were exchanged using the Excel spreadsheet technique, according to the prosecution.

Writer Duncan Campbell, who acted as an expert witness for the defence during the trial, said: "Tough communication interception laws [RIPA] were passed in the UK 10 years ago on the basis that they were needed to fight terrorism. Ludicrous articles were published then about the alleged sophistication of their methods.

"The case just dealt with shows where we have got to in the real world. The level of cryptography they used was not even up to the standards of cryptology and cryptography in the Middle Ages, although they made it look pretty using Excel." ®

Campbell will be writing for the Register on insights into terrorists' use of cryptography soon.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The "provenance" of Inspire:

Quote:
Wikipedia: Authenticity

Some scholars, such as Thomas Hegghammer (of the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment) and Jarret Brachman, argued that the magazine was an unexceptional example of jihadist online literature and did not deserve the media attention it received. [28] [29]

Hegghammer wrote that "there is nothing particularly new or uniquely worrying" about the magazine's content, and its connection to AQAP is likely weak:

"Without signals intelligence it is extremely difficult to determine the precise nature of the link between the editors and the AQAP leadership.

Judging from the amount of recycled material in Inspire, I would be surprised if the AQAP connection is very strong."[28]

While the SITE Institute and at least one senior U.S. government official described Inspire as authentic, there was some speculation on jihadist websites and elsewhere that the magazine, due to its low quality, may have been a hoax.[30]

This view was advocated, in particular, by Max Fisher, a writer for The Atlantic. [31]

Fisher listed five reasons to suspect the publication was a hoax.[31]

According to Fisher, the portable document format (PDF) file that contained the first issue also contained a computer virus.

Fisher noted that the magazine contained an article by Abu Mu'sab al-Suri, noting that al-Suri had been in Guantanamo since 2005, and that whether he was actually tied to al Qaeda remained unclear.



The first Issue was literally, "scrambled eggs", consisting of pages of garbage, falsely alleged to have contained a trojan of some kind.


Operation Cupcake.

As SpyBlog points out: they're called tea cakes here in Blighty ...

Spyblog: MI5 / MI6 / GCHQ / CTIRU should positively deny any involvement in "Operation Cupcake" alleged cyber attack on "Inspire" magazine

Quote:
They, like us, are also sceptical of the provenance of this magazine. It could so easily be some sort of scam perpetrated by one of the unscrupulous wannabe private sector "terrorist trackers" who provide convenient "evidence" in support of multi-billion dollar counter-terrorism budgets and repressive laws.


See also: PublciIntelligence.net: Al-Qaeda Magazine is Cupcake Recipe Book

PublicIntelligence.net: Media Perpetuates Myths About "Virus Attack" on Inspire Magazine


PublicIntelligence.net describe how Sribd put it up on t'interwebs and then claimed they were, get this, "forced by the copyright holder to take it down".

Yeah right ho.

Anwar Our-Lackey and Samir Khan obviously got onto their lawyers and kicked up a fuss no doubt.

Quote:
PublicIntelligence.net

Complete Inspire Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) Magazine

July 14, 2010 in Documents

The following document is reportedly the full and “uncorrupted” version of the Inspire Magazine said to be produced by Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.

A previous version of the magazine was incomplete and contained 64 pages of ASCII cupcake recipe fragments.

This complete version was removed from Scribd after it falsely claimed to have received a notice from the “copyright holder” of the magazine.

The authenticity of the following document should be deeply scrutinized.

We have also been unable to remove password protection and security settings from the file, something that we are normally able to do quite easily with government documents. This document is provided, as always, for educational and informational purposes.

Update: Document is now password free and all security settings have been removed.

Second Update: A second issue of Inspire is available as of October 11, 2010. - (Ed: Fall 2010)

Third Update: A third issue of Inspire is available as of November 21, 2010.

Fourth Update: A fourth issue of Inspire is available as of January 16, 2011.

Fifth Update: A fifth issue of Inspire is available as of March 29, 2011.

Sixth Update: A sixth issue of Inspire is available as of July 18, 2011.

Seventh update: A seventh issue of Inspire is available as of September 27, 2011.



We then got loads of "stories" or fairytales in the media telling us how British spies deliberately corrupted the first version !!

Good old Duncan Gardham again, just doing his job, shovelling excrement into the minds of his readers, for a living ...

Quote:
The Hugely Trustworthy Telegraph

MI6 attacks al-Qaeda in 'Operation Cupcake'

British intelligence has hacked into an al-Qaeda online magazine and replaced bomb-making instructions with a recipe for cupcakes.
U.S.-born radical Yemeni cleric Imam Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen. Selection of cupcakes: MI6 attacks al-Qaeda in 'Operation Cupcake'

Image 1 of 2

The magazine is produced by the radical preacher Anwar al-Awlaki

Photo: AP/ALAMY

Duncan Gardham

By Duncan Gardham, Security Correspondent

7:16PM BST 02 Jun 2011

The cyber-warfare operation was launched by MI6 and GCHQ in an attempt to disrupt efforts by al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsular to recruit “lone-wolf” terrorists with a new English-language magazine, the Daily Telegraph understands.

...


Too many childhood comics. By far ...

No I'm not making it up.

Someone else is.


See also: Does Anyone Take These Al-Qaeda Magazines Seriously?

Mr Justice Wilkie does. Clearly.

Duncan Gardham and Vikram Dodd & co - take note:

Quote:
Public Intelligence

With the release of their November 2010 Special Issue of Inspire magazine, a group claiming to be Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) has again succeeded in getting the entire global news media to uncritically relate their message.

Every few months since the first release of the magazine in July 2010, the public is now subjected to a mass of uncritical stories that propagate predefined talking-points which are taken almost verbatim from one of two “monitoring groups” that actually profit from the sale of terrorist propaganda materials.

One of those groups, the SITE Intelligence Group, was founded by the daughter of an executed Israeli spy.

The other group, IntelCenter, is run by a former intelligence operative name Ben Venzke whose website offers a catalog to purchase Al-Qaeda videos, terrorist explosives manuals, and large, $30-40 terrorism-related wall charts.

Despite this, many reporters do not seem to have been inspired enough to even examine the document in question.

Joel Meares of the Columbia Journalism Review writes that when “Reading the latest terror reports it seems that any questions about the validity of Inspire have disappeared.

The magazine once greeted with skepticism and perspective—to what extent one publication can speak for as disparate and fractured a community as the jihadists is always a question—is now being treated as the unquestioned and official spokes-journal of Al-Qaeda. And some close watchers of Al-Qaeda caution against the approach.”

From the initial release of the Summer 2010 issue of Inspire, we have expressed our doubts regarding the authenticity of these documents.

With that initial release, which contained 64 pages of seemingly garbled text, we conclusively demonstrated that the file had not been corrupted by any virus, but had been deliberately spliced together with a book of cupcake recipes written by one Dulcy Israel.

However, this received little attention. In fact, with the subsequent release of the second issue in October 2010, no one even seemed to note the anomalous cupcake origins of the document’s predecessor. They also failed to notice many other anomalies, such as the usage of material supposedly written by Osama Bin-Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri, who are described by Max Fisher of the Atlantic as “extremely secretive” and usually issue statements “directly to the media”. Fisher concludes that “It would be unusual for them to write for a third-party publication, especially one put out by the Yemen-based AQAP, with which they have little or no direct ties.”

Other oddities include the prominent use of a Desert Eagle handgun beneath the phrase “the dust will never settle” on page 25 of the first issue. The Desert Eagle is designed by Israeli Military Industries (now Israeli Weapons Industries) and manufactured in the United States.

There is the difference in Al-Malahem logos first noted by Al-Jazeera’s Gregg Carlstrom. Moreover, there is the astoundingly overlooked fact that Jihadi forums openly described the magazine as a forgery that had been created by the “apostate hypocrit (sic) dogs who are trying to discredit the Mujahideens.”

In the image above, taken from page 7 of the second issue of Inspire, the magazine's authors reinforce the illusory belief that the first issue had been "struck with a virus".

The second issue of Inspire continued with these oddities, distorting the record of the first magazine by furthering the false impression that the first issue had been struck by a virus. On page 7 of the second Fall 2010 issue of Inspire, the creators claim that the “first issue of Inspire was struck with a virus that deleted 64 out of its 67 pages”.

The writer then goes on to incorrectly reference an incident in late July when the FBI demanded the removal of a website from a hosting service that resulted in the take down of approximately 73,000 blogs. That incident was supposedly caused by materials related to the first issue of Inspire. The writer then asks “Why are they so scared?”

Understanding that the first issue of Inspire was not hit by a virus, but was instead spliced with a book of ASCII cupcake recipes, one must wonder why the producers of the magazine would aid the U.S. government and other authorities in perpetuating the myth that it was hit by a virus.

Certainly, if an intelligence agency or other rogue entity had attacked a version of the magazine with cupcake recipes in the hopes of making AQAP look technically inept, that would make for excellent propaganda.

However, we find that instead, the entity producing these publications is reinforcing an inaccurate view that the magazine was somehow “corrupted” by a virus.

Given that the initial garbled version of Inspire was released on Jihadi forums in the form of links to dozens of temporary locations on file storage sites, the 64 pages of cupcake recipes must have been inserted prior to distribution. This conclusion is substantiated by the metadata in each of the original Inspire PDF files.

The first Inspire released with the cupcake recipes has the following timestamp:

2010-06-29 T16:50:27+01:00

The corrected version of the first issue of Inspire has the following timestamp:

2010-05-16 T16:58:51+03:00

This indicates that the original “complete” first issue of Inspire was created on May 16, 2010 and the “corrupted” version was created on June 29, 2010. Moreover, the corrupted version was created using a different program, PDFill rather than Adobe InDesign CS4, and was also created in the timezone for mainland Europe rather than Yemen.

As this information is so easily accessible, substantial consideration must be given to the question of why the authors of Inspire would choose to support the fraudulent belief that the magazine had been attacked by a virus.

The authors do not say that the release of the corrupted version was done by another group, implying instead that the file was somehow struck subsequent to its release. However, we know that this is not correct because there is no virus in the file and the garbled pages are cupcake recipes.


Who is Anwar al-Awlaki?

To understand some of the more fundamental reasons for doubting the authenticity of Inspire magazine, we must first examine the man whose group is supposedly producing the publication. Who is Anwar al-Awlaki? He was born in New Mexico and received his Master’s Degree from San Diego State University. He attended George Washington University until 2001 working on his doctorate. His father was a Fullbright scholar who received his doctorate from the University of Nebraska and worked at the University of Minnesota. According to CNN, the “al-Awlaki family comes from a large and powerful tribe in southern Yemen called the al-Awalek tribe. It has many connections to the government of Yemen, including the country’s prime minister, Ali Mohammed Mujawar, who is a relative of the family.”

Awlaki worked for the Department of Defense as part of their outreach towards the Muslim community following the attacks of September 11, 2001.

In the months following the attacks he dined with “military brass” in the Army’s Office of Government Counsel.

According to an employee that attended the luncheon, Awlaki was impressive and “condemned Al Qaeda and the terrorist attacks. During his talk he was ‘harassed’ by members of the audience and suffered it well.”

In the years following this meeting, Awlaki would reportedly become radicalized, eventually moving to Yemen to pursue jihad. However, according to the Los Angeles Times, many people in Yemen have never even heard about Awlaki. Many of those who area aware of him openly express their doubts about his authenticity.

One person is quoted by the Times as saying “Al Qaeda is not real. They’ve been created for political reasons. We don’t know what’s going on or what exists and what doesn’t.”

In fact, Awlaki’s father also claims that the charges levied against his son are untrue. In a letter sent to President Obama about his son being placed on a CIA assassination list, Dr. Nasser Awlaki says that “My son is innocent, has nothing to do with violence and he is only a scholar of Islam and I believe that this has nothing to do with terrorism.”


The Packages Didn’t Come From Yemen

Following his supposed involvement with the Christmas Day “Underwear Bomber” Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab and the Fort Hood shooter Nidal Hassan, Awlaki’s most recent terror salvo involved sending packages containing explosive ink toner cartridges loaded inside normal-looking printers.

This “Cargo Plot” has been the source of great anxiety for U.S. security officials, spurring increased security and screening measures across the U.S. However, according to several Yemeni shipping officials, the alleged packages containing the bombs did not come from Yemen. According to Fiaz Gazali, a senior security official at Sana’a airport, “There is no proof that the package came through the airport and I confirm that the package was not from Yemen. UPS or FedEx has not landed a single plane in our airports for a long time.”

In fact, the day of the attacks Mohammed al-Shaibah, Air Cargo Director for Yemenia Airways told the Yemen Post that “No UPS cargo plane left Yemeni lands over the land 48 hours. These accusations are false and baseless. No UPS or DHL cargo packages heading to Chicago through Yemen took place in the last 48 hours as well. All packages are checked very carefully in Yemen, and there is no evidence to prove that this package came through Yemen.”

According to Voice of America, the U.S. government and President Obama did not learn of the threat from these bombs until late in the evening on October 28.

However, the Israeli Transporation Minister, Yisrael Katz has stated that Israel received warning of the plot to send bombs to U.S. synagogues at least a day before that. Katz said that “Since Thursday Israeli representatives have been on location in sensitive airports around the world, securing shipments to Israel” and that this was being conducted ahead of a “large-scale drill at Ben Gurion International Airport”.


Support for Screening

Due to the mass of uncritical reporting surrounding the most recent issue of Inspire, the magazine is playing a functional role in persuading public opinion in favor of increased security measures in the U.S. and around the world. By reinforcing the notion that there is a determined group in Yemen sending these package bombs, the magazine serves to bolster official support for invasive screening procedures. In fact, overwrought and overly-expensive security measures are exactly the group’s goal according to page 7 of the latest issue:

“The air freight is a multi-billion dollar industry. FedEx alone flies a fleet of 600 aircrafts and ships an average of four million packages per day. It is a huge worldwide industry. For the trade between North America and Europe air cargo is indispensable and to be able to force the West to install stringent security measures sufficient enough to stop our explosive devices would add a heavy economic burden to an already faltering economy. We knew that cargo planes are staffed by only a pilot and a co-pilot so our objective was not to cause maximum casualties but to cause maximum losses to the American economy. That is also the reason why we singled out the two U.S. air freight companies: FedEx and UPS for our dual operation.”

Interestingly enough, many of the passages are written from a perspective that appears to reinforce enhanced U.S. screening measures. For example, in an article about the “The Objectives of Operation Hemorrhage” written by the “Head of Foreign Operations” the group claims that “if both packages passed through the inspection at the FedEx and UPS facilities and passed through the X-Ray systems at the airport, that would raise a worldwide alert that would force upon the West two choices: You either spend billions of dollars to inspect each and every package in the world or you do nothing and we keep trying again.

The packages not only made it out of Sana’a but one of them made it all the way to London and if it was not for an intelligence tip, both devices would have detonated.” Notice how the dichotomy in this statement is set up to reinforce the efficacy of screening procedures: either you screen everything or we keep trying, indicating that they would stop if effective screening measures were enacted.

Another passage dismisses metal detectors as “amateurish” while reinforcing the potential efficacy of X-ray screening equipment. In an article from the “Explosives Department” argues that “We have been blessed by Allah to be able to sidestep the metal detection equipment and this is evident in the operation of Umar Farouk and the operation of Abul Khayr, may Allah accept him. That capability was a result of avoiding the use of metals altogether in our detonators. We have developed five such detonators.” The writer goes on to very briefly describe the detection mechanisms that X-Ray scanners use and says “We have studied various X-Ray scanners that are in use and those that might be deployed in the future but are too expensive to deploy now. All these scanners work on one principle even if they are different. In the future, new scanners could be developed to designate specific colors for explosive material, but is this method practical?”


No Exclusive Photos

Despite the magazine’s claims on its cover and table of contents, the latest issue of Inspire does not contain images of the “bombs” before they were shipped to the United States. What the magazine does contain is pictures of a printer that is the same model and a copy of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations. There are no photos of the inner, explosive components of the bomb or its preparation. This should not be hard to do considering the prevalence of equipment for taking digital photographs and the creators’ obvious intent to document their actions for propaganda purposes. In fact, the only pictures of the internal explosives and detonators come from photos released by the Dubai Police.


Different Logos

As was noted previously, the logos used for Inspire magazine in all of its versions are different than the traditional al-Malahem logo.



The new al-Malahem logo used in Inspire.




The older logo used by al-Malahem. Notice the swooping 'alif.


A Cold Diss

There are strange messages at the bottom of “advertisements” on pages 5,9, and 12. One of these messages describes the advertisement as being “brought to you by A Cold Diss.” Several similar messages have occurred in each of the first two magazines.



Bottom of page 5.





Bottom of Page 9.





Bottom of page 12.



U.S. Email Addresses

Since the first issue of Inspire, the magazine has offered email addresses and a PGP key in order to contact them. These email addresses are:

inspire1magazine@hotmail.com
inspire11malahem@gmail.com
inspire22malahem@fastmail.net
inspire2magazine@yahoo.com

With such scrutiny on their activities, why would a terrorist organization openly publish four unchanging contact addresses that are all hosted on U.S. servers?

Once the first magazine was released, it would require extremely minimal time to obtain a search warrant or conduct higher level NSA spying on the addresses. Jihadi groups often disseminate videos and other materials via U.S. file hosting services that serve as dropboxes. However, these only last for a short time before they are removed and they only allow for one way surveillance. That is, government sources could determine who is downloading the materials, but the potential targets of this surveillance could not interact with the dropbox.

Why would a magazine designed to promote American Jihadism set up what is essentially a trap for those attempting to communicate with AQAP, ensuring that all messages are categorized, indexed, and readied for subpoena or monitoring under some higher, unknown precedent?

Even if the messages are encrypted, as the magazine instructs that they should be, it still would lead to the leakage of identifying information such as IP addresses and other lesser known indicators. Moreover, the magazine is obviously intended for instructional purposes to an audience unfamiliar with such security measures. Also, it is worth noting that 2048 bit PGP keys are usually substantially longer than the one provided by Inspire.


Be Critical

In a recent piece from the Columbia Journalism Review discussing some of the highly uncritical coverage of the latest issue of Inspire magazine, Aaron Zelin, a research assistant at the Department of Politics at Brandeis and a blogger at Jihadology.net, is quoted as seeing a changing tone in the coverage of the magazine. “The media has taken the latest edition as truth instead of being critical of the information in it—outlets have been taking what they say as fact.”

With so much strangeness in these documents, with the cold disses, cupcake recipe sabotages, and ultimate mowing machines, we must continue to ask: does anyone take these al-Qaeda magazines seriously?

Or perhaps, more properly, why would anyone take these al-Qaeda magazines seriously? Please tell us if you know.


And all of that has somehow managed to wend it's wicked way into our judicial system and the learned and traditionally, discriminating minds, of our Judges evidently ...

On a nod and a wink mind ...


If you google "intel center aqap inspire" and then click on the Intel Center search result, you will have the pleasure of seeing the Intel Center's list of the 36 editions of another internet glossy:

Afghanistan "In Fight" Magazine


I kid you not ...


Specific URLs are hard to come by with Intel Center so that's the only way I know how to do it.


Quote:
Re: A Cold Diss and "AQAP" Inspire Mag

Anagrams of A Cold Diss include:

Is Old SCAD (State Crime Against Democracy)

and

Solid SCAD


.

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The Medium is the Massage - Marshall McLuhan.
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