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David Davis asks did MI5 help toture Binyam Mohamed?
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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MI5 culture ignores human rights
MI5 unaccountable
MI5 complicit in torture
MI5 out of control

Dear Appeal Court Judge please remove the following from your judgement, thanks, Miliband & MI6's Chief lawyer.

Profile of QC at centre of Binyam case
A top Government lawyer protested over the strength of a judge's "exceptionally damaging" criticism of the British security service in the Binyam Mohamed case, it was disclosed today.
By Tom Whitehead, Home Affairs Editor, Daily Telegraph 10 Feb 2010
Jonathan Sumption QC wrote a letter to the Appeal Court on Monday after seeing a draft copy of the judgment of the Master of the Rolls (Mr), Lord Neuberger.
Mr Sumption has been described as the "cleverest man in Britain" with a "brain the size of a planet" and is regarded as one of the leading silks in the country.
He has represented the Government on a number of occasions, including the Hutton Inquiry and the Railtrack shareholder action as well as the Queen in a dispute with the Mirror following its undercover expose of life at Buckingham Palace.
For a brief period last year he was hotly-tipped to become the 12th Justice in the Supreme Court which, ironically, would have filled a vacancy left by Lord Neuberger after he was appointed Master of the Rolls.
But he is not without his critics and is a member of the exclusive club of barristers said to have earned more than £2 million in a year.
In 2005, Railtrack shareholders accused the Government of trying to price them out of legal action by employing the services of Mr Sumption against their claim that officials, including Stephen Byers, the former Transport Secretary, abused their position by placing Railtrack in administration at a loss to shareholders.
His presence in the case meant the legal fees would be that much higher, the shareholders, who eventually lost their claim, argued.
In 2003, he represented the Government in the Hutton Inquiry in the death of scientist David Kelly.....

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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The political storm over allegations of MI5 complicity in torture escalated tonight after Alan Johnson, the home secretary, accused the media of publishing "groundless accusations" and commentators of spreading "ludicrous lies" about the Security Service.
As defence lawyers prepared to challenge the government's success in suppressing severe criticism of MI5 officers made by one of Britain's most senior judges, the Liberal Democrat leader, Nick Clegg, pointed the finger at the "very top of government" saying senior ministers had probably known about claims of Britain's involvement in torture but failed to take action to stop it.
The home secretary's intervention came as Kim Howells, the chairman of the parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC), came out in support of Jonathan Evans, the director general of MI5, dismissing any suggestion that he had been misled by the Security Service. He said he had seen no evidence that MI5 had colluded in torture.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/feb/12/binyam-mohamed-alan-johnso n-mi5

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Classified documents reveal UK's role in abuse of its own citizens

Previously secret papers show true extent of involvement in abduction and torture following al-Qaida attacks of 2001

• Read the classified documents here

* Ian Cobain and Owen Bowcott
* guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 14 July 2010 20.43 BST

The true extent of the Labour government's involvement in the illegal abduction and torture of its own citizens after the al-Qaida attacks of September 2001 has been spelled out in stark detail with the disclosure during high court proceedings of a mass of highly classified documents.

Previously secret papers that have been disclosed include a number implicating Tony Blair's office in many of the events that are to be the subject of the judicial inquiry that David Cameron announced last week.

Among the most damning documents are a series of interrogation reports from MI5 officers that betray their disregard for the suffering a British resident whom they were questioning at a US airbase in Afghanistan. The documents also show that the officers were content to see the mistreatment continue.

One of the most startling documents is chapter 32 of MI6's general procedural manual, entitled "Detainees and Detention Operations", which advises officers that among the "particular sensitivities" they need to consider before becoming directly involved in an operation to detain a terrorism suspect is the question of whether "detention, rather than killing, is the objective of the operation".

Other disclosed documents show how:

• The Foreign Office decided in January 2002 that the transfer of British citizens from Afghanistan to Guantánamo was its "preferred option".

• Jack Straw asked for that rendition to be delayed until MI5 had been able to interrogate those citizens.

• Downing Street was said to have overruled FO attempts to provide a British citizen detained in Zambia with consular support in an attempt to prevent his return to the UK, with the result that he too was "rendered" to Guantánamo.

The papers have been disclosed as a result of civil proceedings brought by six former Guantánamo inmates against MI5 and MI6, the Home Office, the Foreign Office, and the Attorney General's Office, which they allege were complicit in their illegal detention and torture.

The government has been responding to disclosure requests by maintaining that it has identified up to 500,000 documents that may be relevant, and says it has deployed 60 lawyers to scrutinise them, a process that it suggests could take until the end of the decade. It has failed to hand over many of the documents that the men's lawyers have asked for, and on Friday failed to meet a deadline imposed by the high court for the disclosure of the secret interrogation policy that governed MI5 and MI6 officers between 2004 and earlier this year.

So far just 900 papers have been disclosed, and these have included batches of press cuttings and copies of government reports that were published several years ago. However, a number of highly revealing documents are among the released papers, as well as fragments of heavily censored emails, memos and policy documents.

Some are difficult to decipher, but together they paint a picture of a government that was determined not only to stand shoulder to shoulder with the United States as it embarked upon its programme of "extraordinary rendition" and torture of terrorism suspects in the immediate aftermath of 9/11, but to actively participate in that programme.

In May, after the appeal court dismissed attempts to suppress evidence of complicity in their mistreatment, the government indicated that it would attempt to settle out of court.

Today the government failed in an attempt to bring a temporary halt to the proceedings that have resulted in the disclosure of the documents. Its lawyers argued that the case should be delayed while attempts were made to mediate with the six men, in the hope that their claims could be withdrawn in advance of the judicial inquiry. Lawyers for the former Guantánamo inmates said it was far from certain that mediation would succeed, and insisted the disclosure process continue.

In rejecting the government's application, the court said it had considered the need for its lawyers to press ahead with the task of processing the 500,000 documents in any event, as the cases of the six men are among those that will be considered by the inquiry headed by Sir Peter Gibson. Last week, in announcing the inquiry, Cameron told MPs: "This inquiry will be able to look at all the information relevant to its work, including secret information. It will have access to all relevant government papers – including those held by the intelligence services."

Cameron also made clear that the sort of material that has so far been made public with the limited disclosure in the Guantánamo cases would be kept firmly under wraps during the inquiry. "Let's be frank, it is not possible to have a full public inquiry into something that is meant to be secret," he said. "So any intelligence material provided to the inquiry panel will not be made public and nor will intelligence officers be asked to give evidence in public."

The coalition government is anxious to draw a line under what is currently described in Whitehall as "detainee legacy issues". It hopes that mediation, followed by the inquiry, will lift the burden of litigation that it is currently facing while restoring public confidence in MI5 and MI6.

It also wishes to preserve what it calls "liaison relationships" – operational links with overseas intelligence agencies, including those known to use torture – on the grounds that they are a vital part of the country's counterterrorism strategy.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Government 'plotted to send UK citizens to Guantánamo'

Decisions revealed in classified documents on extraordinary rendition

* Ian Cobain
* guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 13 July 2010 22.17 BST
* Article history

Evidence that the British government plotted to have a number of UK citizens sent from Afghanistan to Guantánamo Bay after the al-Qaida attacks of September 2001 has emerged in previously classified documents handed to lawyers representing victims of extraordinary rendition.

The documents show that Tony Blair's office intervened to thwart Foreign Office efforts to secure the release of a British Muslim detained in Zambia, with the result that he too was sent unlawfully to the American detention centre on Cuba.

While a number of senior figures in the last Labour government publicly criticised the use of Guantánamo and called for its closure, the documents show that in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 a decision had been taken at the highest level to use it to incarcerate British nationals.

The contents of some documents were made public at the high court today as lawyers for six rendition victims opposed an application by the government to halt their claim for damages temporarily. The government argues that proceedings should be delayed while attempts at mediation are made before a judicial inquiry into the UK's role in torture and rendition announced last week.

Tim Otty QC, counsel for five of the six men, said proceedings should be allowed to continue because the documents that the government is beginning to disclose shed new light upon the role that the UK authorities played in the men's mistreatment.

One document disclosed by the Foreign Office, dated 10 January 2002 and entitled Afghanistan UK Detainees, expressed what it described as the government's "preferred options". It states: "Transfer of United Kingdom nationals held to a United States base in Guantánamo is the best way to meet our counter-terrorism objectives, to ensure they are securely held." The "only alternative", the document adds, was to place these individuals in the custody of British forces in Afghanistan, or to return them to the UK. The court heard that a similar document was sent a week later to Sir Christopher Meyer, the British ambassador to Washington.

Otty said the contents of some of the documents "raise a number of troubling questions as to the role of the former prime minister's office in frustrating the release of one of the claimants", Martin Mubanga, who had been detained in Zambia early in 2002. "In the period of March and April 2002, the prime minister's office apparently countermanded a desire on the part of the foreign and commonwealth office to intervene on behalf on Mr Mubanga."

Number 10 had ordered that Mubanga, a dual British-Zambian national, should not be allowed to return to the UK, and the foreign office realised that if it sought consular access – thus acknowledging they regarded him as British – he would have been released to the UK authorities. One FO document complained about "the schizophrenic way in which policy on this whole case was handled in London", which had put the British high commission in Lusaka "in an impossible position".

By this date, said Otty, the risk of those falling into US hands being rendered and tortured was well known. "Despite that, someone at Number 10 saw fit to counter what the foreign office wished to do."

Mubanga was held in Guantánamo for 33 months. He and the other five men, including Binyam Mohamed, are suing MI5 and MI6, the foreign office, the home office and the attorney general over the role they played in their rendition and mistreatment.

The court heard that there was evidence apparently showing Blair's office or the UK intelligence agencies "playing some kind of role in determining the scope of consular access" to the men over subsequent years, as well as intervening in a manner that impeded their release.

Government lawyers have been contesting the six men's claims for more than a year. In May, after the appeal court dismissed attempts to suppress evidence of complicity in their mistreatment, the government indicated that it would attempt to settle out of court. Yesterday Rory Phillips QC, for the government and intelligence agencies, said compensation could be offered as a result of any mediation.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Covert words that paint a vivid picture of complicity in torture

• Foreign Office and No 10 interventions revealed
• Emails and memos began months after September 11

* Ian Cobain and Owen Bowcott
* guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 14 July 2010 20.43 BST
* Article history

Early January 2002. The Taliban regime in Kabul had been toppled, Nato forces were spreading out across Afghanistan, and the initial military response to the events of September 11 appeared to be running smoothly.

But in Whitehall – and particularly at the Foreign Office – there were the first signs of nervousness over the proposed manner of dealing with one problem that had arisen in the country: a small number of British citizens and residents, all Muslims, had been detained by US forces.

A mass of documents disclosed during high court proceedings show how rapidly the government became involved in the abduction and torture of these individuals in its attempts to secure the UK against attack by al-Qaida.

They also appear to show how little regard was given within the government to the illegality of its own actions.

On 4 January 2002, a memo circulated to the secretaries of the junior Foreign Office ministers Ben Bradshaw and Lady Amos, as well as to the Foreign Office press office and the department's senior legal adviser, Sir Michael Wood, notes: "Public opinion has on the whole shown little concern about the welfare of the British detainees, or the legal terms of their detention. But the issue is clearly of sensitivity to Muslim opinion in the UK and abroad."

It adds that the FCO should be "seen as applying our normal standards of consular assistance as far as possible". Consular officials had not seen these detainees, however, and "our holding line, that we are first seeking to establish identity details, is wearing thin", not least because extensive reports about one individual had already appeared in the press.

At this time, the fact that "rendition" – abducting an individual and moving them against their will from one country to another – was illegal appears not to have been a concern. A document disclosed by the Foreign Office, dated 10 January 2002 and entitled Afghanistan UK Detainees, expresses the government's "preferred options". It states: "Transfer of United Kingdom nationals held by US forces in Afghanistan to a United States base in Guantánamo is the best way to meet our counter-terrorism objectives, to ensure they are securely held." The "only alternative", the document adds, would be to place these individuals in the custody of British forces in Afghanistan, or to return them to the UK.

At around the same time Jack Straw, then foreign secretary, was sending a telegram to several British diplomatic missions around the world in which he signalled his agreement with this policy, but made clear that he did not wish to see the British nationals moved from Afghanistan before they could be interrogated.

"A specialist team is currently in Afghanistan seeking to interview any detainees with a UK connection to obtain information on their terrorist activities and connections," Straw wrote.

"We therefore hope that all those detainees they wish to interview will remain in Afghanistan and will not be among the first groups to be transferred to Guantánamo. A week's delay should suffice. UK nationals should be transferred as soon as possible thereafter."

In the event, the "interview" process in Afghanistan took considerably longer. The manner in which some were conducted is revealed within the reports that an MI5 officer sent to London after each of his encounters with Omar Deghayes, a Libyan-born British resident who was being held at the US air base at Bagram, north of Kabul, in June and July that year. Deghayes is one of the men currently suing the government.

The MI5 interrogators were clearly aware of the manner in which Deghayes was being mistreated. Their only emotional reaction to his plight appears to have been disgust at his physical condition. Considering him to be insufficiently forthcoming, they decided to abandon him to further treatment at US hands.

Some of the disclosed documents are fragmentary and partially intelligible.

Much to the anger of lawyers representing those men suing the government, a number have been blacked out completely, leaving only a date.

A page of one document bears the MI5 letter head and logo, but has been so heavily redacted that only one word, "conclusion", remains visible. Among the papers is a handwritten note, headed "Warriors 14/1", that appears to relate to the state of a detainee in Afghanistan. It states: "Interview conditions: cold beaten up." According to one of the claimants' lawyers it dates from a period when MI5 officers were interviewing detainees in Kabul. The note appears to end with a list of options which includes "collusive deportation extradition".

There is a clear account of the fate of Martin Mubanga, another of the men suing the government, despite the large amounts of black ink that were used to conceal parts of the documents relating to his case before they were handed over.

A joint Zambian-British citizen, Mubanga travelled after 9/11 from Afghanistan to Zambia, where he was detained in March 2002 by Zambian officials accompanied by Americans. A number of messages between the British high commission in Lusaka and the Foreign Office in London show that Blair's office had decided that "under no circumstances should Mubanga be allowed to return to the UK". Should consular officials obtain access, however, there was a danger that the Zambians would hand Mubanga over to the British.

The exchanges become increasingly irate, with one official complaining about "the schizophrenic way in which policy on this whole case was handled in London": one half of the Foreign Office was insisting that Mubanga was entitled to consular assistance, and the other half was saying it should not take responsibility for him.

It had put the British high commission in Lusaka "in an impossible position", and there was a need for "co-ordinated thinking" to avoid such problems arising in future.

The documents show that there had been a proposal to put Mubanga on trial in the UK, but as a consequence of the British decision to wash their hands of him he was flown to Guantánamo, where he spent the next 33 months.

It was not the only time the prime minister's office intervened to thwart attempts by Foreign Office officials to obtain a degree of protection for British citizens, according to the documents.

Minutes prepared for the Home Office terrorism and protection unit after a meeting in April 2002 of officials including John Gieve, the Home Office permanent under-secretary, state that the American authorities had been informed that the British government might begin making public requests for legal access to British men held at Guantánamo. "FCO had wanted to do this (and wanted to be seen to be doing it) but had been overruled by No 10," the minutes say.

The same minutes show that while consideration was being given to the prosecution in the UK of some individuals in Afghanistan, David Blunkett, home secretary, warned there would be questions about the public interest in prosecuting "young and ill-informed individuals who may have been manipulated by others".

Missing from the documents so far disclosed is a copy of the secret policy that governed MI5 and MI6 officers interrogating detainees held overseas between mid-2004 and earlier this month, when it was revised on the orders of the coalition government.

The court had ordered that it be handed over by last Friday, but it failed to materialise. Instead, lawyers for the six men were given the chapter from MI6's manual that deals with detainee operations. This explains that MI6 officers are involved in detaining suspects or helping others do so; interviewing; and preparing reports based on details passed by overseas agencies.

When detaining suspects themselves, officers should consult superiors and consider where the detainee will be held and how they will be treated. There is another consideration. "Is it clear that detention, rather than killing, is the object of the operation?" the manual asks.

This document was handed over instead of one that is known to be extraordinarily sensitive. Ministers of the last government repeatedly insisted that the secret interrogation policy of recent years should never be made public.

The former foreign secretary David Miliband even indicated to a Commons select committee that to do so would "give succour" to the nation's enemies.

Redactions

The black ink that obscures parts of Security Service and Foreign Office papers has frustrated lawyers for the six claimants. Known as redactions, the boxes hide information deemed too sensitive to release on national security grounds. Sapna Malik, representing Binyam Mohamed, complains that they make it hard to reach a settlement and avoid protracted litigation. Any assessment is made "very difficult by the limited nature of the disclosure provided to date, the heavy redaction of the handful of potentially relevant documents … and the refusal of the [government] to provide meaningful answers to the claimants' requests for further information".

Nonetheless, despite so much being withheld, the release of security service reports of interviews with detainees in Guantánamo Bay and other overseas detention centres is almost unprecedented.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The torture files: key passages

We highlight the key passages from the classified documents disclosed in high court proceedings - and what they show. Click on each passage in red to read the annotations

• The torture files: MI6 legal advice
• The torture files: Downing Street's role
• The torture files: the Whitehall row
• The torture files: the interrogations

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jack Straw's role in UK rendition revealed - The Guardian

...

Andrew Tyrie, the Conservative MP who established the Commons All-Party Parliamentary Group on Extraordinary Rendition, said: "I am appalled but not entirely surprised by the extent of British involvement in extraordinary rendition which these documents appear to reveal. I was extremely concerned to read the telegram [giving the go-ahead for removing those detained in Afghanistan to Guantánamo] attributed to Jack Straw. If it is from him, it reveals that as foreign secretary in 2002 he stated that the transfer of UK detainees to Guantánamo Bay was the 'best way' and should take place 'as soon as possible' after the detainees had been interviewed by a British team."

"Yet Jack Straw subsequently claimed that he had no knowledge of any British involvement in rendition. Worse, he dismissed the concerns of those of us who had raised this issue over many years as 'conspiracy theories'.

I hope there is a good explanation. In the absence of one, for a Foreign Secretary to have issued such denials, after having apparently endorsed the rendition of UK detainees three years earlier, would further erode the public's trust in politics.

....

Blairwatch

This is from the Rt. Hon. Jack Straw's testimony which he gave on 13 December 2005 to the Foreign Affairs Select Committee:

...

Unless we all start to believe in conspiracy theories and that the officials are lying, that I am lying, that behind this there is some kind of secret state which is in league with some dark forces in the United States, and also let me say, we believe that Secretary Rice is lying, there simply is no truth in the claims that the United Kingdom has been involved in rendition full stop, because we have not been, and so what on earth a judicial inquiry would start to do I have no idea. I do not think it would be justified. While we are on this point, Chairman, can I say this? Some of the reports which are given credibility, including one this morning on the Today programme, are in the realms of the fantastic.

...

That's worth repeating:

Unless we all start to believe in conspiracy theories and that the officials are lying, that I am lying, that behind this there is some kind of secret state which is in league with some dark forces in the United States ....

So, whilst he is building up to the lie, he is actually telling us the truth of the matter, but qualifying that truth in pejorative terms that cannot be believed, as to do that, would render one a conspiracy theorist.

The psychology of lying, laid bare for all to see.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Answer at last
Yes MI5 did.

Guantánamo Bay prisoners to get millions from British government
Compensation details to be revealed in parliament today after weeks of negotiations between detainees and government
Patrick Wintour and Matthew Weaver
guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 16 November 2010 11.19 GMT

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/16/guantanamo-bay-prisoners-c ompensation
Former Guantanamo Bay prisoners Omar Deghayes, Binyam Mohamed and Martin Mubanga will receive millions of pounds from the British government. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images/Reuters/PA
The government has agreed to pay millions of pounds in compensation to former Guantánamo Bay detainees following weeks of negotiations between lawyers for the government and the former prisoners.
Bilderberg financial terrorist, war criminal and Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke will make an oral statement on the issue in the House of Commons at about 3.30pm.
A written statement had been planned, but the government was under pressure to announce to allow debate and questions........

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Following a police investigation, Britain’s Director of Public Prosecutions, Keir Starmer, said there was insufficient evidence to bring a criminal case against the officer, referred to only as Witness B.
“I am delighted that after a thorough police investigation the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has concluded that Witness B has no case to answer in respect of his interviewing of Mr. Binyam Mohammed,” MI5 Director General Jonathan Evans said in a statement.
“Witness B is a dedicated public servant who has worked with skill and courage over many years to keep the people of this country safe from terrorism and I regret that he has had to endure this long and difficult process.”
http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/892195--no-action-against-uk -spy-over-torture-claims

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Disgusting!
Former Foreign Secretry David Milliband looks to have avoided jail for sanctioing war crimes then!
Binyam Mohamed case dropped today

pill sweetened by announcing two new probes - in this case into former anti-Gaddafi Libyan terrorists who are now working for MI6 - Abdel Hakim Belhadj and Abdel Hakim Belhadj - one as leader of the 'free Syrian army'.
I wonder if they were the people MI6 paid to try and assassinate Gaddafi - the case Annie Machon and David Shayler resigned over - back on 31st July 1998????

Find out all about their crooked solicitors
Lots of pretty girly lawyers to persuade the public they are nice people
Leigh Day & Co
here - 30 minutes in

Link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MheeiX2w8JU

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A rather bold editorial from today's Guardian.

By jove, I do believe they've finally got it ...

Maybe an aide memoire for Princess Bliar ? We can but hope ...

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Rendition: Straw in the wind

Power has always corrupted, and the British state is not and never has been immune

Editorial
guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 18 April 2012 23.09 BST
Article history

Power has always corrupted, and the British state is not and never has been immune. On Wednesday, the Guardian revealed how the man from Whitehall put the shredder to energetic use to conceal colonial crimes in the 50s. Allegations of British voices popping up to question abused suspects in far-flung places continue under this government and up until this day; indeed, there is reason to believe that the courts will soon hear more such complaints.

With the passage of time the UK's post-9/11 dealings might have become one more lesson in how Bad Stuff Happens. It hasn't happened though. Extra digging still yields extra dirt about the Blair years. In respect of rendition, at least, things are not looking good for the prime minister who said history would be his judge. Time was when Whitehall would simply dismiss talk of torture as the stuff of deranged conspiracies. But Binyam Mohamed's claim to have been "abducted, hauled from one country to the next, and tortured in medieval ways" was steadily borne out. Rangzieb Ahmed's missing fingernails cried out for a public account that never came. Then, thanks to the collapse of the Gaddafi regime, we learned about the rendition and mistreatment of Abdel Hakim Belhaj and his wife, and of how a top MI6 man told that regime that the safe dispatch of this human "air cargo" as being "the least we could do for you".

It is, in sum, increasingly plain that the British security state was out of control for a number of years. The remaining question is whether this was a case of rogue agencies running wild or of malign instructions from the political masters. The united front between the professional and elected arms of government may already be descending into a blame game. After the former foreign secretary Jack Straw insisted amid the Belhaj row that no minister could know everything that is done in their name, there were weekend reports that officials had paid him a visit to confront him with evidence that he had signed off on the case. On Wednesday, it emerged legal action was being taken against him – and not in the familiar form of a case against the secretary of state, but as a case against Mr Straw personally. In the background is a police investigation which could give rise to grave criminal charges.

The wheels of justice must be given time to turn – rushing to conclusions is in no one's interest. As home secretary, Mr Straw passed the Human Rights Act, and he often seemed more concerned with the rule of law than his boss. And yet it was on his watch that the foreign office calmly described late-night flights to the lawless hell of Guantánamo as a "preferred option". Whether blame in the Belhaj case attaches to him or not, something plainly went awry. The proceedings against him are only the latest straw in a chilling wind.


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Whitehall_Bin_Men
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hilarious! BBC Daily Politics guru Jo Coburn censoring the news this week to protect criminals in the secret services.

Link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coXS2d0Hljo
BBC gets fake "technical difficulties" when reporter starts detailing #MI6 criminal complicity with torture https://youtu.be/coXS2d0Hljo

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'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
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Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
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Whitehall_Bin_Men
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually - David Miliband did wriggle out of it!
No mention of him whatever in this week's torture report!
Clearly a UK Foreign Secretary working for Israel.



Mark Gobell wrote:
Looking forward to the Zio-boy David squirming out of this one !

The Guardian, on 22 October 2008 wrote:
Miliband also wanted to suppress relevant documents, not because they would reveal any intelligence operations but because the US claimed that if they were disclosed serious harm would be done to "intelligence sharing" between the UK and the US.


Source

The Guardian, on 28 August 2008 wrote:
The US state department yesterday warned that disclosure of secret information in the case of a British resident said to have been tortured before he was sent to Guantánamo Bay would cause "serious and lasting damage" to security relations between the countries.

In an email to the Foreign Office, which was read out to the court, Mathias said disclosure would cause "serious and lasting damage to the US-UK intelligence-sharing relationship and thus the national security of the UK".


Source

And yet . . .

The BiBiC today wrote:
No 10 said it was not aware of any threat from the US government to withdraw intelligence co-operation with Britain if details of the case were revealed.


Source

Shurely shome mishtake ?

The BiBiC reporting on David Davis wrote:
The former shadow home secretary raised the case in a point of order in the House of Commons.

David Miliband should explain what degree of complicity we have in this. He said Foreign Secretary David Miliband should make a statement to MPs about the issue as soon as possible to "explain what the devil is going on".


Can't wait for that . . .

Excellent background of the case and chronology of there never was a dirty bomb plot after all, Gitmo detainee, Binyam Mohamed from Andy Worthington

Today's High Court Judgement is here and all of their judgements are here

Quote:
Conclusion

106.

In the judgement of the Foreign Secretary there is a real risk that, if we restored the redacted paragraphs, the United States Government, by its review of the shared intelligence arrangements, could inflict on the citizens of the United Kingdom a very considerable increase in the dangers they face at a time when a serious terrorist threat still pertains.


So, whilst most unthinking folk are led to believe that the mythical Al Q's omnipresence threatens every human being;

Meanwhile, back in real world of who actually threatens who . . .

We learn by their documented threats and with our Foreign and Commonwealth Office's support, who are supposed to be responsible for our own "homegrown" intelligence agencies, our security is most definitely threatened by the agencies of a nation, with whom we are led to believe that we enjoy some kind of symbiotic, special relationship....

If the redacted paragraphs about torture were restored to the High Court's previous judgement and published, then, on the Zio Boy David's advice and in the wake of his PII certificates which render our interest; the public interest, "immune" from petty legal procedures, the US would throw it's dummy out of it's pram and deliberately compromise the US / UK intelligence sharing arrangements, which in turn, would inflict on the citizens of the United Kingdom "a very considerable increase in the dangers they face."

All because the United States of Amerikka and it's puppet, Zanu-Lab Zio-GB, does not want to admit that it tortured your loved one . . .

When it most obviously did.

With friends like that eh . . .

So now we know . . .









True scale of UK role in torture and rendition after 9/11 revealed
Two damning reports reveal British intelligence’s treatment of terrorism suspects
Ian Cobain and Ewen MacAskill
Thu 28 Jun 2018 11.44 BST First published on Thu 28 Jun 2018 10.00 BST
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/jun/28/uk-role-torture-kidnap -terror-suspects-after-911-revealed

British intelligence agencies were involved in the torture and kidnap of terrorism suspects after 9/11, according to two reports by the parliamentary intelligence and security committee.

The reports published on Thursday amount to one of the most damning indictments of UK intelligence, revealing links to torture and rendition were much more widespread than previously reported.

While there was no evidence of officers directly carrying out physical mistreatment of detainees, the reports say the overseas agency MI6 and the domestic service MI5 were involved in hundreds of torture cases and scores of rendition cases.

Could the UK become embroiled in human rights abuses in future?
Read more
The committee says the agencies were aware “at an early point” of the mistreatment of detainees by the US and others. There were two cases in which UK personnel were “party to mistreatment administered by others”. One has been investigated by the Metropolitan police but the other is still to be fully investigated.

Profile
UK's role in torture and kidnap: the key points

Show
Jack Straw, the foreign secretary from 2001-06, will face questions over how much he knew and, given that accusations of torture and rendition were widespread at the time in the press, why he did not ask for a briefing.

A key passage in the report says MI6 “sought and obtained authorisation from the foreign secretary” for the costs of funding a plane involved in an individual rendition case.


Guardian Today: the headlines, the analysis, the debate - sent direct to you
Read more
One report deals with the mistreatment and rendition of detainees between 2001 and 2010, while the other considers current issues.

The report dealing with the treatment of detainees details a litany of cases of concern, saying: “We have found 13 incidents where UK personnel witnessed at first hand a detainee being mistreated by others, 25 where UK personnel were told by detainees that they had been mistreated by others and 128 incidents recorded where agency officers were told by foreign liaison services about instances of mistreatment. In some cases, these were correctly investigated but this was not consistent.”

It said in 232 cases UK personnel continued to supply questions or intelligence to other services despite knowledge or suspicion of mistreatment, as well as “198 cases where UK personnel received intelligence from liaison services which had been obtained from detainees who knew they had been mistreated – or with no indication as to how the detainee had been treated but where we consider they should have suspected mistreatment”.

The committee found three individual cases where MI6 or MI5 made or offered to make a financial contribution to others to conduct a rendition operation. In 28 cases, the agencies either suggested, planned or agreed to rendition operations proposed by others. In a further 22 cases, MI6 or MI5 provided intelligence to enable a rendition operation to take place. In 23 cases they failed to take action to prevent rendition.

The report says those at headquarters were aware of reports of mistreatment by the US – including 38 cases in 2002 alone – but did not take them seriously.

“That the US, and others, were mistreating detainees is beyond doubt, as is the fact that the agencies and defence intelligence were aware of this at an early point,” the report says. “The same is true of rendition: there was no attempt to identify the risks involved and formulate the UK’s response. There was no understanding in HMG of rendition and no clear policy – or even recognition of the need for one.”

The chair of the committee, Dominic Grieve, said because it had been denied access to key intelligence individuals by the prime minister, the committee had reluctantly decided to bring the inquiry to a premature end. He said the reports were being published now because he felt the information gathered so far should be put into the public domain.

Had the inquiry continued, the committee would have called the then home secretary David Blunkett and Straw to explain what they understood to be the situation at the time and why a briefing was not requested.

In a statement, Straw, who said he would have given evidence to the committee if asked, said that although he was responsible as foreign secretary for MI6 and the surveillance agency GCHQ, he had only learned for the first time from the reports about much of their activities.

“The report also shows that where I was involved in decisions I consistently sought to ensure that the United Kingdom did act in accordance with its long stated policies, and international norms.” Straw said.

The MI6 building in Vauxhall, south London
The MI6 building in Vauxhall, south London. Photograph: Tim Ireland/PA
The reports say evidence of the direct involvement of MI6 officers and a British military officer in the mistreatment of detainees at the Bagram airbase in Afghanistan was withheld from the intelligence committee in the past. This involved sleep deprivation, starvation and the use of stress positions.

The committee said it had wanted to interview the MI6 officers involved but said: “The government has denied us access to those individuals.”

While one officer had been investigated by Scotland Yard, the other had not, the report said, adding: “There must now be a question as to whether that investigation is reopened.”

The military officer’s involvement in the mistreatment was investigated by military police, but that inquiry was shut down after MI6 refused to cooperate.

The involvement with torture and rendition is set out in the report Detainee Mistreatment and Rendition 2001-2010.

The investigation was ordered by David Cameron in 2010. A former judge produced an interim report but, frustrated by too many unanswered questions, the inquiry was passed to the intelligence committee.

The second report, which focuses on guidance given to intelligence officers, is also critical, saying that a policy on treatment of detainees overseas was published in 2009-10 but there had been “remarkably little attempt to evaluate the guidance over the past seven years”. The Cabinet Office had conducted only “a light touch” review last year, prompted by the committee inquiry.

The intelligence agencies are unlikely to respond directly to the reports, leaving it to the government. The present head of MI6, Alex Younger, said in the past the organisation, reviewing its role after 9/11, had learned tough lessons and changes had been introduced over the last 17 years. MI6 works with a wide range of partner countries whose laws are different but they know “our red lines”.

Theresa May issued a statement saying the lessons of what happened in the aftermath of 9/11 “are to be found in improved operational policy and practice, better guidance and training, and an enhanced oversight and legal framework”.

She added: “We should be proud of the work done by our intelligence and service personnel, often in the most difficult circumstances, but it is only right that they should be held to the highest possible standards in protecting our national security.”

May’s statement did not address the committee’s conclusion that the UK had been in breach of the international prohibition on torture. Nor did she say anything about the recommendation that a fresh police investigation be considered..

_________________
--
'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com
http://aanirfan.blogspot.com
Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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