FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist  Chat Chat  UsergroupsUsergroups  CalendarCalendar RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

3 Nazi A-Bomb Tests? Enriched Uranium U235 For 1945 US Nukes
Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    9/11, 7/7, Covid-1984 & the War on Freedom Forum Index -> The Bigger Picture
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 18181
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2020 5:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dr. Joseph Farrell – Martin Bormann and the rise of the post-war Fourth Reich – How did Martin Bormann survive the war and what was he up to afterwards? What is the truth regarding the nuclear weapons research of the axis powers? What is scalar weapons? Did Nazi scientists attain cold fusion in Argentina? To what extent did the extraterritorial Nazi state influence USA? Dr. Farrell returns to continue the uncovering of our recent history, which addresses many more mysteries regarding WW2, as an Antarctica revisit, how the Nazi remnants transformed into a Bormann Reich, the crucial year of 1947 (youtube interview)

As WWII ended, and Hitler handed power to Admiral Doenitz, German submarine U-234 was in mid-Atlantic en-route to Japan with 560Kg of Nazi enriched uranium along with infra-red fuses needed for a plutonium bomb: 1945, night of 12 May – German submarine U-234 commanded by Lt. Captain Johann Heinrich Fehler is transporting 560kg of precious Nazi enriched Uranium U235, encased in gold, from the Baltic to Japan. Onboard two Japanese naval officers Hideo Tomonaga and Lt. Genzo Shoji are killed or commit suicide shortly before the U-boat alters course and then surrenders to Destroyer USS Sutton (DE771) on 14 May. With a skeleton crew and shadowed by the Sutton, U-234 heads for the US naval base at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Its deadly cargo, now destined for the Manhattan Project, is secretly offloaded on 18 May 1945.

https://politicsthisweek.wordpress.com/2020/04/09/bcfms-politics-show- presented-by-tony-gosling-5/

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Whitehall_Bin_Men
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 3086
Location: Westminster, LONDON, SW1A 2HB.

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2020 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Discovery of radioactive metal points to 'success' of Nazi atomic bomb programme
Oranienburg was reportedly the location of Adolf Hitler’s secret uranium enrichment facility
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/radioactive-nazi-atom- bomb-bernd-th-lmann-germany-amateur-treasure-hunter-a7963521.html

Fiona Keating
Saturday 23 September 2017 17:52
Hitler reportedly had a research facility to build an atomic bomb
Hitler reportedly had a research facility to build an atomic bomb ( AP )
An amateur treasure hunter in Germany has stumbled upon what could be radioactive material from a secret research facility dating back to World War II.

64-year-old Bernd Thälmann was exploring the ground in Oranienburg, north-east Germany, with his metal detector when it gave an unusual ‘bleep’.

After bringing the mysterious object home, the pensioner alerted the authorities about his discovery of a shiny lump of metal.

Download the new Independent Premium app
Sharing the full story, not just the headlines
Download now
Police discovered the find was radioactive, leading to the evacuation of 15 residents from several houses by emergency services.

Read more

Calls for extremism inquiry after 'neo-Nazi' soldiers arrested

Pug taught Nazi salute is 'grossly offensive', says Jewish leader

Why the outrage about Paul Hollywood dressing up in a Nazi uniform?

'I helped defeat fascism in 1941. I'm ready to do it again now'
Specialists in hazmat suits searched Mr Thälmann’s home and removed the suspicious object in a lead-lined container which was then placed inside a protective suitcase.

Mr Thälmann is now being investigated for being in possession of “unauthorised radioactive substances”, according to the Berlin Courier.

German authorities have revealed that the area of Oranienburg was the location of Adolf Hitler’s secret uranium enrichment facility.

The research centre was tasked with enriching uranium oxide imported from South America, to make weapons-grade plutonium. The ultimate aim was to create a Nazi atomic bomb.

According to police, Mr Thälmann was intent on retracing his steps to find more hard evidence of the mysterious Nazi-era site. The amateur archaeologist was proving uncooperative, according to authorities.

A police statement revealed that “the finder refuses to provide information on the exact location.” An investigation was launched, with the radioactive find part of a criminal investigation, according to AFP.

DAILY CORONAVIRUS BRIEFING
No hype, just the advice and analysis you need
Britain and the United States have long possessed information regarding the Nazi’s plans to make atomic bombs.

Nazi reconnaissance maps


The US National Archives released documents this year about the National Socialist Party developing nuclear weapons.

The log book from Hans Zinsser, a German test pilot read: “In early October 1944 I flew away 12-15km from a nuclear test station near Ludwigslust (South of Lübeck).

“A cloud shaped like a mushroom with turbulent, billowing sections (at about 7000 metres) stood, without any seeming connections over the spot where the explosion took place. Strong electrical disturbances and the impossibility to continue radio communication as by lighting turned up.”

There are claims that his testimony was corroborated by another pilot, while an Italian correspondent also saw the explosion, reporting the incident to Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini.

According to Berlin historian Rainer Karlsch in his book Hitler’s Bomb, German scientists carried out three nuclear weapons tests just before the end of the Second World War.

However, Mr Karlsch’s theory was discredited by Gerald Kirchner of Germany’s Federal Office for Radiation Protection. In a Der Spiegel report, Mr Kirchner says that soil sample readings at the detonation sites show “no indication of the explosion of an atomic bomb.”

Christian Broughton
How you can support truly independent journalism
Every penny donated will fund public-interest reporting you value most
Support

_________________
--
'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com
http://aanirfan.blogspot.com
Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Whitehall_Bin_Men
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 3086
Location: Westminster, LONDON, SW1A 2HB.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Author fuels row over Hitler's bomb
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2005/sep/30/books.italy

· Germany 'came close to nuclear device in 1944'
· Last living witness saw Baltic test explosion
John Hooper in Rome
Fri 30 Sep 2005 09.53 BST First published on Fri 30 Sep 2005 09.53 BST

A book published in Italy today is set to reignite a smouldering controversy over how close the Nazis came to manufacturing a nuclear device in the closing stages of the second world war.
The 88 year-old author, Luigi Romersa, is the last known witness to what he and some historians believe was the experimental detonation of a rudimentary weapon on an island in the Baltic in 1944.

Hitler's nuclear programme has become a subject of intense dispute in recent months, particularly in Germany. An independent historian, Rainer Karlsch, met with a barrage of hostility when he published a study containing evidence that the Nazis had got much further than previously believed.

Mr Romersa, a supporter of Mr Karlsch's thesis, lives today in an elegant flat in the Parioli district of Rome. His study walls are covered with photographs from a career during which he interviewed many of the major figures of the 20th century, from Chiang Kai-shek to Lyndon Johnson. Though he suffers from some ill-health these days, he is still lucid and articulate.

He told the Guardian how, in September 1944, Italy's wartime dictator, Benito Mussolini, had summoned him to the town of Salo to entrust him with a special mission. Mussolini was then leader of the Nazi-installed government of northern Italy and Mr Romersa was a 27 year-old war correspondent for Corriere della Sera.

Mr Romersa said that when Mussolini had met Hitler earlier in the conflict, the Nazi dictator had alluded to Germany's development of weapons capable of reversing the course of the war. "Mussolini said to me: 'I want to know more about these weapons. I asked Hitler but he was unforthcoming'."

Advertisement

Mussolini provided him with letters of introduction to both Josef Goebbels, the Nazi propaganda chief, and Hitler himself. After meeting both men in Germany, he was shown around the Nazis' top-secret weapons plant at Peenemünde and then, on the morning of October 12 1944, taken to what is now the holiday island of Rügen, just off the German coast, where he watched the detonation of what his hosts called a "disintegration bomb".

"They took me to a concrete bunker with an aperture of exceptionally thick glass. At a certain moment, the news came through that detonation was imminent," he said. "There was a slight tremor in the bunker; a sudden, blinding flash, and then a thick cloud of smoke. It took the shape of a column and then that of a big flower.

"The officials there told me we had to remain in the bunker for several hours because of the effects of the bomb. When we eventually left, they made us put on a sort of coat and trousers which seemed to me to be made of asbestos and we went to the scene of the explosion, which was about one and a half kilometres away.

"The effects were tragic. The trees around had been turned to carbon. No leaves. Nothing alive. There were some animals - sheep - in the area and they too had been burnt to cinders."

Advertisement

On his return to Italy, Mr Romersa briefed Mussolini on his visit. In the 1950s, he published a fuller account of his experiences in the magazine Oggi. But, he said, "everyone said I was mad".

By then, it was universally accepted that Hitler's scientists had been years away from testing a nuclear device. Allied interrogators who questioned the German researchers concluded that there were vast gaps in their understanding of nuclear fission. In any case, the US had needed 125,000 people to develop the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, whereas Germany's programme involved no more than a few dozen physicists, led by the Nobel laureate Werner Heisenberg.

But documents published recently by Mr Karlsch and an American scholar, Mark Walker of Union College, Schenectady, have punctured this consensus. Russian archives have shown that one of the German scientists lodged a patent claim for a plutonium bomb as early as 1941 and, in June, the two historians published an article in the British monthly, Physics World, that included what they claimed was the first diagram of one of the bombs Hitler's scientists were trying to build - a device that exploited both fission and fusion.

Advertisement

The true novelty of Mr Karlsch's research, though, is to have turned the spotlight off Heisenberg and onto a competing project run by one Kurt Diebner. A Nazi since 1939, Diebner had his own group at Gottow near Berlin. Mr Karlsch found evidence to show that, sponsored by Walther Gerlach of the Reich Research Council, this group abandoned its quest for an A-bomb to concentrate on a weapon made of conventional high explosives packed around a nuclear core. "It was a tactical battlefield weapon they probably wanted to use against the approaching Soviet armies," said Professor Walker.

Could Mr Romersa have seen the detonation of an early prototype? He is not the only person to have claimed to have witnessed similar explosions. Former East German archives have produced this account by Cläre Werner: on the evening of March 3 1945, she claimed, she was near the town of Ohrdruf when she saw a "big, slim column" rise into the air, "so bright that one could have read a newspaper".

Ohrdruf had a concentration camp, part of the Buchenwald complex. Heinz Wachsmut, who worked for a local excavating company, told officials that the day after Ms Werner claimed to have seen an explosion he was ordered to help the SS build wooden platforms for the cremation of the corpses of prisoners. He said their bodies were covered with horrific burns.

Advertisement

After the war, the scientists engaged in the Nazi project were interned. Gerlach, whose research in other fields won him praise from the likes of Albert Einstein, returned to academic life and died a revered figure. Diebner eventually got a job in West Germany's defence ministry. Neither man ever alluded to their work on what would have been the world's first tactical nuclear weapon.

"Diebner and Gerlach said nothing about this," said Prof Walker. "They took it to their graves."

· Le armi segrete di Hitler, by Luigi Romersa, is published by Ugo Mursia Editore. €14

_________________
--
'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com
http://aanirfan.blogspot.com
Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 18181
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2021 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Secret documents reveal Germans tested nuclear bomb in 1944 as doodlebugs pounded London
DOCUMENTS unearthed in an American archive suggest that Nazi Germany may have tested an operational nuclear bomb before the end of the Second World War.
By ALLAN HALL IN BERLIN
00:00, Thu, Feb 23, 2017 | UPDATED: 10:56, Thu, Feb 23, 2017
0Comment sectionShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on PinterestCopy link
Hitler - The Blitz in London
GETTY

Documents suggest Nazi Germany tested an operational nuclear bomb
Sign up for FREE now and never miss the top politics stories again
Enter your email address here
SUBSCRIBE
We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you've consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

Recently declassified file APO 696 from the National Archives in Washington is a detailed survey of how far Third Reich scientists got in the development of an atomic bomb - something Hitler craved.

In the file, obtained by the daily newspaper Bild, the task of the academics who prepared the paper between 1944 and 1947 was the "investigations, research, developments and practical use of the German atomic bomb".

The report was prepared by countless American and British intelligence officers and also includes the testimony of four German experts - two chemical physicists, a chemist and a missile expert.

RELATED ARTICLES

Hitler’s doppelgänger spotted in AUSTRIA near Nazi leader's birthplace

Incredible story of one of Britain’s last surviving Nazi POW escapees
Strong electrical disturbances and the impossibility to continue radio communication as by lighting turned up

Hans Zinsser log

It concurs that Hitler's scientists failed in the quest to achieve a breakthrough in nuclear technology - BUT that a documented test may have taken place of a rudimentary warhead in 1944.


The statement of the German test pilot Hans Zinsser in the file is considered evidence: the missile expert says he observed in 1944 a mushroom cloud in the sky during a test flight near Ludwigslust.

Sponsored
musthavemoneytips.co.uk
UK Seniors Born 1940 - 1970 Can Claim This Brilliant New Benefit
by Taboola
His log submitted to the Allied investigators reads; "In early October 1944 I flew away 12-15 km from a nuclear test station near Ludwigslust (South of Lübeck).

Documents intelligence world war
AMERICAN NATION ARCHIVES

The report was prepared by American and British intelligence officers
"A cloud shaped like a mushroom with turbulent, billowing sections(at about 7000 metres) stood, without any seeming connections over the spot where the explosion took place. Strong electrical disturbances and the impossibility to continue radio communication as by lighting turned up."

He estimated the cloud stretching for nine kilometres and described further "strange colourings" followed by a blast wave which translated into a "strong pull on the stick" - meaning his cockpit controls.

Intelligence report
AMERICAN NATIONAL ARCHIVES

Intelligence report
AMERICAN NATIONAL ARCHIVES

The report concurs that Hitler's scientists failed to achieve a breakthrough in nuclear technology
An hour later a pilot in a different machine took off from Ludwigslust and observed the same phenomenon.

According to other archival documents, the Italian correspondent Luigi Romersa observed on the ground the same explosion. He had been sent by dictator Benito Mussolini to watch the test of a "new weapon" of the Germans. He was ordered to report his impressions back to Mussolini.

Hitler pursued the goal of nuclear technology

It is known that Hitler pursued the goal of nuclear technology and wanted his V-2 rockets to be able to carry them to destroy the UK.

The testimony of the four German scientists in the declassified American report mentions a top secret meeting held in Berlin in 1943 at which armaments minister and Hitler favourite Albert Speer was present for the discussion called a "nuclear summit."

In the end the report states that the Allies believe the Germans fell short of triggering the nuclear chain reaction necessary to trigger a nuclear blast - but none could come up with an explanation for what occurred in the skies over Ludwigslust in 1944.



intelligence-report-nazi-germany-840228.jpg
 Description:
us intelligence reports
 Filesize:  52.2 KB
 Viewed:  55 Time(s)

intelligence-report-nazi-germany-840228.jpg



intelligence-report-nazi-germany-840230.jpg
 Description:
us intelligence reports
 Filesize:  54.65 KB
 Viewed:  55 Time(s)

intelligence-report-nazi-germany-840230.jpg



intelligence-report-world-war-ii-840223.jpg
 Description:
us intelligence reports
 Filesize:  48.49 KB
 Viewed:  55 Time(s)

intelligence-report-world-war-ii-840223.jpg



_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 18181
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2021 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Indeed, the author and historian Leo St Clare Grondona, who led de-Nazification classes for German prisoners at Wilton Park after the war, went as far as to say: ‘Had it not been for the information obtained at these centres, it could have been London and not Hiroshima which was devastated by the first atomic bomb.’

By the end of 1939, it was clear that the Tower of London could no longer cope with the massive influx of captives and three further centres – Trent Park at Cockfosters in North London, Wilton Park near Brighton, and Latimer House in the Buckinghamshire countryside – were opened.

Operation Eavesdrop: How captured Nazi generals were held in stately homes and wined and dined at the Ritz to flatter their egos so they would spill Hitler's plans to hidden microphones
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7391081/Nazi-generals-wined-d ined-Ritz-spill-Hitlers-plans-hidden-microphones.html

Nazi generals were treated to the finest lifestyle so that they could be spied on
Microphones were hidden in everything from pot plants to the billiard table
One historian even said if it wasn't for these centres it could have been London devastated by the first atomic bomb
By HELEN FRY FOR THE MAIL ON SUNDAY

PUBLISHED: 23:09, 24 August 2019 | UPDATED: 23:52, 24 August 2019

e-mail
152
shares
100

View comments
In the elegant drawing room, the pink gin is being served.

Newspapers and magazines are scattered over the coffee tables, while on the sofas the guests smoke cigarettes with their drinks as they await the sumptuous dinner to come.

The year is 1943, and although Britain and her allies are deep into a protracted war with Germany, there are no signs of deprivation or rationing here.

Quite the reverse. With billiards, art classes, cigars and fine wines on tap, the guests – all of them male – appear to be revelling in the trappings of life in a classic English country house.

Captured German generals were wined and dined in luxury, as in this scene from the 1966 film Triple Cross starring Yul Brynner +6
Captured German generals were wined and dined in luxury, as in this scene from the 1966 film Triple Cross starring Yul Brynner

So much so that nobody witnessing this genteel scene could possibly guess the astonishing truth behind it: that these pampered guests are, in fact, high-ranking German prisoners of war responsible for countless deaths and atrocities – and that their luxurious surroundings are the setting for one of Britain’s most breathtakingly audacious and successful spying operations.

Only now, with the declassification of highly confidential documents and a raft of new research, can the details of one of wartime espionage’s best-kept secrets be fully revealed – along with the story of its brilliant spymaster, Thomas Kendrick, a charismatic ex-soldier whose character would not be out of place in a John le Carré novel.

Eighty years after this remarkable operation was first launched, I will describe how:

Kendrick arranged for captured German generals and field marshals to live a life of luxury in stately homes, while secretly recording all their private conversations.
Even the plant pots, billiard tables and light fittings were bugged in order to pick up nuggets of information that could help the British war effort.
More than 10,000 PoWs were eavesdropped on by teams of hundreds of ‘secret listeners’, many of them German emigres who had fled the Nazi regime.
German officers were flattered by their lavish treatment into revealing vital intelligence, boasting to each other about the stupidity of their British captors.
Kendrick ignored the orders of a furious Churchill to stop wining and dining prisoners at London’s most expensive restaurants.
Intelligence gathered by Kendrick and his staff led directly to raids which delayed the development of Germany’s long-range V1 and V2 flying bombs by months, allowing the D-Day landings to take place.

Cultured, quick-witted and a gifted pianist, Thomas Kendrick had already been a spy for 30 years as the Second World War was about to break out.

In 1938, he returned to London from a posting in Vienna to one of the biggest challenges of the conflict: as commander-in-chief of MI6’s brand new listening unit.

This ground-breaking and highly sophisticated operation, codenamed the M Room (M stood for ‘miked’), was a piece of early genius by British intelligence.

RELATED ARTICLES
Previous
1
Next

Farewell to another of The Few: Canadian-born Squadron...

Trouble at Hitler High: Californian principal of school...
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Share
MI6’s idea was that prisoners of war would be matched up into groups of two or three and placed in cells together, where their unguarded conversations would be recorded, translated and analysed by teams of ‘secret listeners’ via hidden microphones.

It was a strategy which was to yield spectacular results, and Kendrick was the perfect choice to lead it.

Married to a German citizen and a fluent speaker of the language himself, he bore no ill-will towards his wife’s compatriots and refused to allow torture or cruelty by his staff.

Above all, he was a pragmatist whose sole aim was to find clever ways, however unorthodox, to get his prisoners to spill the beans.

The day that German forces invaded Poland, on September 1, 1939, Kendrick opened his first clandestine unit within a special compound at the Tower of London.

The historic site that had witnessed the deaths of Royals and traitors was about to find a whole new role within British history.

The first prisoners arrived at the Tower on September 17, 1939, from an enemy U-boat sunk off the coast of North-West Ireland. Others quickly followed.

Within weeks, more than 100 captives were held there. Mission M Room had begun.

As prisoners were brought in, they were subjected to a phoney interview, designed to give them a low impression of their questioners and avert suspicion that their accommodation might be bugged.

Back in their rooms, they would then brag to their fellow captives about how little they had revealed to their British interrogators.

One, Freiherr von Reitzenstein, who was picked up in the North Sea on October 1, joked with his cellmate after a five-hour interrogation: ‘My God, what s**t we served them up!’

Of course, the pair had fooled no one, Kendrick later writing that he had found them ‘crude, and incapable of deceiving anybody’.

Apparently trivial scraps of conversation between prisoners began yielding vital information.

Already an intelligence jigsaw was being built about Germany’s bombing capacity, radio communications, technical advances and military losses.

On November 9 came the first of many references to Hitler’s ‘secret weapon’, although it was unclear what this might be.

An M Room report at the time read: ‘Hitler’s secret weapon is talked about a lot. They [PoWs] believe in it, but say there is no possibility of bacteriological warfare.’

These conversations would later play a key role as the hostilities unfolded.

By the end of 1939, it was clear that the Tower of London could no longer cope with the massive influx of captives and three further centres – Trent Park at Cockfosters in North London, Wilton Park near Brighton, and Latimer House in the Buckinghamshire countryside – were opened.

When the cost of making the sites operational – about £400,000 then, the equivalent of £2 million today – was challenged by the Cabinet, the combined heads of the intelligence services responded in a no-nonsense memorandum.

They argued that the M Room unit was ‘of the utmost operational importance, vital to the needs of the three fighting services and should accordingly be given the highest degree of priority in all its requirements; that the normal formalities regarding surveys, plans and tenders should be waived; and that any work required should be put in hand at once and completed by the earliest possible date, irrespective of cost’.

From the prisoners had by now come vital information on U-boats, mines and torpedoes, the impact of air raids and details of underwater refuelling for warships.

The intelligence was invaluable. Yet still prisoners continued to believe they had outsmarted their interrogators.

A bomber mechanic captured in February 1941 told his cellmate in a conversation recorded by the secret listeners: ‘He [the interrogation officer] asked what engine the Dornier Do 217 had.

I said I don’t know. As a matter of fact I do know that it has the Bramo double-row radial engine.’


With the middle years of the war came the big prizes for Kendrick: captured German generals and field marshals, with their superior knowledge of military strategy and close links to Hitler. It was time to move the operation up a gear.

The first general to arrive at Trent Park, in August 1942, was the university-educated Ludwig Cruwell, who had succeeded Rommel as commander of the Afrika Korps, followed in October by 51-year-old General Ritter von Thoma, commander of a Panzer tank division and a veteran of Dunkirk.

And so began one of British intelligence’s most cunning deceptions of the war.

The generals had expected to be held in a rudimentary prisoner- of-war camp with Nissen huts and barbed wire – exactly the kind of surroundings that would have encouraged them to give little away.

Instead, they found themselves living in considerable comfort at what they believed was the generous behest of King George VI, as befitted their status as military commanders – a move that played superbly into their sense of self-importance.

Cruwell, Von Thoma and a third senior general, Hans Cramer, were given bedrooms and adjoining sitting rooms, with separate accommodation for their batmen.

A spacious area at Trent Park was set aside for creative activities – for painting and drawing, playing cards, table tennis, billiards, chess and bridge.

As they relaxed – and began dropping their guard – the generals devoted their days to learning languages and studying other subjects, while for those of a musical disposition a string quartet and grand piano were available.

They painted watercolours, had their own portraits painted and were taken to restaurants in London – even to Kendrick’s own home in Surrey.

So enamoured were they of their arrangements that one officer wrote home to his wife to say that he would love his family to be there with him.

‘Our involuntary hosts are thoroughly gentlemanlike,’ he said.

Little did they realise that everything that could be bugged was – from the light fittings to the fireplaces, plant pots, behind the skirting boards, under the floorboards of the bedrooms and even the trees in the gardens.

When they leaned out of a window to speak in order to avoid being overheard, they had no idea that the windowsills, too, were bugged.

The hidden microphones were wired back to the M Room in the basement, where teams of secret listeners worked from the moment the generals woke until the time they went to sleep again.

To flatter them still further, the generals’ every need was met by a man they were told was their welfare officer, Lord Aberfeldy.

There was, in fact, no such person – the so-called aristocrat was one of Kendrick’s intelligence officers, Ian Thomson Monro, a highly talented amateur actor.

‘A delightfully outgoing and intelligent Scot, he was the prototype of the officer and gentleman and his contribution to the war was to act this out to the full,’ said a fellow intelligence officer.

‘He took his guests on walks and to restaurants, galleries and shops in London, disarming not a few with his snob appeal and his assumed title.’

As Lord Aberfeldy, Monro provided a sympathetic ear for the generals and made special shopping trips once a fortnight to buy extra items they requested such as shaving cream and chocolates.

He even arranged for a tailor from Savile Row to come out to Trent Park to provide new clothes for them.

Eventually an exasperated Churchill, hearing about the prisoners’ regular lunches at Simpson’s in the Strand, banned the ‘pampering of the generals’.

But the intelligence services knew that the treatment of the generals was reaping excellent results that could not be obtained in interrogation.

Kendrick relocated lunch with their ‘guests’ to the Ritz instead, and it appears Churchill never found out.

With the arrival towards the end of the war of one of the M Room’s most difficult visitors, General Hermann-Bernhard Ramcke, described as ‘an egotistical, conceited Nazi’, ‘a firm believer in Hitler’ and ‘cold and unco-operative’, Kendrick and his team had to dig deep into their reserves of ingenuity to force him to relax and talk.

Their solution was one of sheer brilliance. Heimwarth Jestin, an American intelligence officer who was a loyal member of Kendrick’s team, recalled: ‘We drafted an artificial press release supposedly from a German newspaper.

‘It announced an award to General Ramcke from Hitler himself – not merely the coveted Order of the Iron Cross, but the very highest level of the Order, the Knight’s Cross with diamonds.

‘The citation, which we invented, mentioned the general’s bravery in defence of Brest [on the French coast]. With this false release in hand and several bottles of cognac, I visited General Ramcke.

‘Saluting smartly, I informed Ramcke of the honour Hitler had bestowed upon him and suggested we celebrate the award.

‘I produced the cognac. Despite his obvious pleasure, he declined for a moment or two, but pride in his new distinction overcame his reticence and we proceeded to celebrate in great style.’

Before long, Ramcke was talking freely, his tongue loosened by the cognac.

The Ritz Hotel in London (pictured) was where some of the captured Nazi generals were wined and dined +6
The Ritz Hotel in London (pictured) was where some of the captured Nazi generals were wined and dined

As he spoke, the secret listeners stood up in the M Room and cheered: he had inadvertently given away details of glider installations and troop information that he had steadfastly refused to divulge during interrogation.

Ramcke died in 1968, never knowing that his medal from the Fuhrer, which he wrote about in his memoirs, had been a fake.


In 1943 came an intelligence breakthrough of such profound significance that it without doubt changed the course of the war.

It began with comments made by a paratrooper at Latimer House, who told his cellmate: ‘I was very amused yesterday when they [the interrogation officers] showed me a drawing of the sloping ramp rocket projector.

'They know nothing about it, which is a relief to me.’

The conversation went on to reveal technical details about launch ramps – a reference to the ‘secret weapons’ which prisoners had first mentioned three years before.

Eleven days later, a bugged discussion between General von Thoma and Cruwell gave further clues to the listeners.

‘No progress whatsoever can have been made in this rocket business,’ said von Thoma.

A radio for the American Office of Strategic Services (OSS), from the Second World War. It comes with a civilian suitcase for a secret agent +6
A radio for the American Office of Strategic Services (OSS), from the Second World War. It comes with a civilian suitcase for a secret agent

‘I saw it once. The major was full of hope. He said, “Wait until next year, then the fun will start. There’s no limit to the range.” ’

The two generals had unwittingly provided, arguably, one of the most important pieces of intelligence thus far.

Earlier in the war, the British military had suspected that a site at Peenemunde, on Germany’s Baltic coast, might somehow have been involved in the production of weapons, but reconnaissance missions had failed to identify anything unusual about it.

Von Thoma’s evidence, however, was deemed to be reliable because it appeared to be an eyewitness account.

On May 26, 1943, the secret listeners overheard yet another discussion between two different officers about the V2 rocket, the world’s first long-range ballistic missile.

Captain Thomas Kendrick and wife leaving a plane at Croydon airport. Captain Thomas Kendrick, former Chief British Passport Control Officer in Vienna, was arrested by the Gestapo +6
Captain Thomas Kendrick and wife leaving a plane at Croydon airport. Captain Thomas Kendrick, former Chief British Passport Control Officer in Vienna, was arrested by the Gestapo

It was enough to convince air intelligence chiefs.

As a direct result of these conversations at Trent Park, RAF pilots were again sent out on secret reconnaissance missions to Peenemunde.

This time, they found the evidence that had been missing before.

‘The first discoveries in the M Room about Peenemunde caused great excitement,’ recalled listener Fritz Lustig.

‘It was quickly realised that a new rocket programme was under way. Picking up this kind of intelligence for the British was very important to us because it could mean the difference between winning or losing the war.’

On June 29, 1943, Churchill authorised an attack on Peenemunde. By a full moon on the night of August 17, 1943, pilots of Bomber Command carried out the first attack in a mission that included 324 Lancasters and 218 Halifaxes.

General Hermann Bernhard Ramcke (pictured) was told that Hitler had awarded him the highest level of the Iron Cross +6
General Hermann Bernhard Ramcke (pictured) was told that Hitler had awarded him the highest level of the Iron Cross

It came at a heavy price. More than 200 British aircrew were killed, along with hundreds of civilians in a nearby concentration camp.

But the impact of the bombing of Peenemunde cannot be over-emphasised. It bought extra time for the Allies and delayed Hitler’s first launch of a V1 on London until June 13, 1944, a week after the successful D-Day landings.

Without the intelligence from the M Room, Germany could have won the technological war, which would have made it difficult to mount the D-Day landings successfully.

The discovery was a major landmark in thwarting Germany’s race for weapons superiority.


As the Second World War approached its end, Kendrick made it compulsory for the generals to be shown footage of Germany’s concentration camps.

Their reactions were recorded in the M Room.

While some refused to believe what they saw, insisting that the film was fake, one commented that it was useless for senior officers to deny knowledge of the camps because ‘practically every German suspected that that sort of thing went on’.

Another said: ‘We are disgraced for all time, and not 1,000 years will wipe out what we’ve done.’

General Hermann Bernhard Ramcke was told that Hitler had awarded him the highest level of the Iron Cross (pictured). He never knew the citation was a British lie +6
General Hermann Bernhard Ramcke was told that Hitler had awarded him the highest level of the Iron Cross (pictured). He never knew the citation was a British lie

Few people have ever heard of Thomas Joseph Kendrick. One reason for his obscurity is that he and the majority of his staff had to take their secrets to the grave – they had all signed the Official Secrets Act.

Even after the official files were released between 1999 and 2004, it took another 13 years for formal recognition of the M Room’s significance, after the purchase of Trent Park for luxury homes.

Key areas within the mansion are now to be made into a museum dedicated to the work of the secret listeners.

With this story emerging from the shadows, the nation can finally pay tribute to the men and women of the M Room and the commanding genius of its spy chief.

Indeed, the author and historian Leo St Clare Grondona, who led de-Nazification classes for German prisoners at Wilton Park after the war, went as far as to say: ‘Had it not been for the information obtained at these centres, it could have been London and not Hiroshima which was devastated by the first atomic bomb.’

The Walls Have Ears: The Greatest Intelligence Operation Of World War II, by Helen Fry, is published by Yale University Press on August 27, priced £18.99.

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    9/11, 7/7, Covid-1984 & the War on Freedom Forum Index -> The Bigger Picture All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group