FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist  Chat Chat  UsergroupsUsergroups  CalendarCalendar RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Could Afghanistan Break NATO?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    9/11, 7/7 & the War on Freedom Forum Index -> General
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
James C
Major Poster
Major Poster


Joined: 26 Jan 2006
Posts: 1046

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Afghanistan is possibly about many things but no one has yet discussed the building of the TAPI pipeline.

TAPI stands for Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India and the pipeline will deliver 30 billion cubic metres (bcm) a year from the Caspian region in Turkmenistan, through Afghanistan from west to south-east, and on to northern Pakistan and India. Afghanistan will take a cut in profits and a small amount of gas and Pakistan and India will have access to the rest; all countries signed the final go ahead for the pipe last year. It's possible some gas will be routed elsewhere in Asia, perhaps to China, or even as LNG shipments from sea ports in Pakistan to the US and UK.



The US has been negotiating over this pipeline for more than a decade starting with Unocal's attempts to wine and dine the Taliban back in the late 90's which came to an abrupt end in August of 2001 when the Taliban withdrew. Of course, 9/11 and the subsequent invasion of Afghanistan shifted the power back to America (and ourselves) who wish to exploit the oil and gas being produced by US and UK oil companies in the Caspian basin. TAPI is important to the US because it directly challenges the Iranians proposal to supply Pakistan and India with gas with the construction of its own IPI (Iran-Pakistan-India) pipeline which has been mooted for 15 years. If TAPI is built it will give greater authority to the US in the Middle East (as well as profits) and be a direct challenge to the power Iran and Russia might hope to gain by exploiting their energy supplies.

There are many articles on the TAPI pipe but it's never mentioned by mainstream media. Seems they don't want to reveal the truth.

The following article sheds more light on the subject.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig9/bacon6.html

Quote:
Operation Enduring Pipeline

by Don Bacon


Operation Enduring Freedom is the official label for the US military invasion and occupation of Afghanistan. After almost seven years of fighting, what has been gained? What might be gained?

Militarily, US frustration with heavy casualties and lack of progress came to a head recently when Defense Secretary Robert Gates blamed NATO allies for US casualties. “I know I’ve been a big nag, and I know I’ve been a pain, … but for NATO to continue to be tied up in politics [because of a lack of public support] and issues between governments that are irrelevant to whether we are making progress in Afghanistan, I just don’t have patience any more . . .We’ve got kids dying because of the gaps.”

Freedom? There's no progress there, either, for women, journalists and Afghanis in general.

Freedom for women? Ann Jones, a writer who has lived in Afghanistan, writes that promises to the Afghans are repeatedly broken. The national government, with the consent of the occupation, installed many of the very warlords who had shelled Kabul for years. Afghan women, by far, have had it the worst, suffering for centuries in a moribund patriarchal culture, from relentless discrimination that regarded them as the lowest form of slaves. A recent example: On May 21, 2007, the lower house of the Afghan parliament, the Wolesi Jirga, voted to suspend Malalai Joya, a female MP elected from Farah province. Malalai was accused of insulting the parliament and suspended until the end of her term in 2009. Malalai’s suspension occurred after she appeared in a television interview comparing the parliament to an animal stable.

Freedom of the press? The fourth trial of journalist Sayed Parwez Kambakhsh, condemned to death, scheduled for Sunday, June 15, was delayed again by the judges in the case. Medical evidence has been submitted showing Kambakhsh was tortured during interrogations at the Balkh provincial jail. Yakub Kambakhsh, older brother of Parwez, and a noted journalist himself said, “Now we have found out that there is no impartial court in Afghanistan, even in the capital." The Committee to Protect Journalists in Afghanistan on June 11th called on President Karzai for press freedom:

Call for the release of imprisoned journalism student Parwez Kambakhsh, who was sentenced to death by a provincial court in January on blasphemy charges.
Identify and prosecute the killers of BBC journalist Abdul Samad Rohani, who was slain in Helmand province on June 7.
Investigate reported attacks in western Herat province against two female journalists who later resigned their news media positions. Unidentified assailants twice hurled grenades at Khadija Ahmadi’s house in April after she was anonymously warned to quit her post at Faryat radio station, according to news reports.
Direct prosecutors to drop criminal charges against the privately run television network Tolo TV for defying a parliamentary ban on selected Indian soap operas.
Freedom for the Afghanis? According to the recent Amnesty International Report 2008: Violations of international humanitarian and human rights law were committed with impunity by all parties, including Afghan and international security forces and insurgent groups. All sides carried out indiscriminate attacks, which included aerial bombardments by the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and US-led Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) forces, as well as suicide attacks by armed groups. According to the Afghanistan NGO Security Office, there were around 2,000 non-combatant civilian deaths, with international forces causing over a quarter of casualties and insurgent groups just under half. Rights associated with education, health and freedom of expression were violated, particularly for women. Human rights defenders and journalists, many of them women, were threatened, physically intimidated, detained or killed. Reforms of key government institutions, including the police and intelligence service, made limited progress. Government officials and local power-holders were not held accountable for reported abuses and there was little or no access to justice in many areas.

Freedom is in big trouble in Afghanistan, but let's think positive, prospects for a natural gas pipeline might be better.

Turkmenistan is just north of Afghanistan. Daniel Sershen reported a year ago from Ashgabat, Turkmenistan for the Christian Science Monitor: "Blanketed by vast deserts, Turkmenistan sits atop some of the world's largest natural-gas reserves. As Russia and the West look to secure new gas and oil supplies in a tightening race for energy security, this Central Asian country has landed squarely in their sights. Last weekend, Russia secured a deal for a new pipeline to take Turkmenistan's gas north, delivering a serious setback to US and European hopes for one that would siphon the gas to the West – bypassing Russia's increasingly powerful grip on energy resources and routes."

Setback to the West? Not so fast. In response, last November Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India, the four partners of a proposed $3.3 bn pipeline, vowed to accelerate work on the four-nation project to bring natural gas from Turkmenistan to India. The declaration was adopted in New Delhi at a two-day regional economic cooperation forum on Afghanistan, which was attended by Afghan President Hamid Karzai. The proposed gas pipeline project (TAPI) will initially provide 30 million cubic meters of gas to Pakistan and India each and 5 million cubic meters to Afghanistan on a daily basis, which can be later increased up to 90 million cubic meters in aggregate. TAPI will run from the Dovetabat gas deposit in Turkmenistan to the Indian town of Fazilka, near the border between Pakistan and India. Six compressor stations are to be constructed along the pipeline. TAPI certainly would help the consumer countries, Pakistan and India, while Turkmenistan could make billions of dollars from gas exports. But arguably it would benefit US-client Afghanistan most by providing steady transit fees to fill depleted state coffers in Kabul.

The American company Unocal has a ten-year history of interest in the Turkmenistan gas field and a pipeline through Afghanistan. The Taliban wasn't interested, but the Hamid Karzai government is more amenable. On April 28 Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Turkmen President Gurbanguly Berdimukhamedov met in Kabul, where they signed an agreement on extension of a gas pipeline from Turkmenistan to Afghanistan, Pakistan and India.

A key political objective of the TAPI pipeline, one that changed it from TAP to TAPI, was to involve India and keep it away from a proposed Iran-Pakistan-India (IPI) pipeline. This would receive a boost from a civil nuclear energy pact with the United States.

But India has its politics also. The future of the nuclear energy pact between New Delhi and Washington appears bleak, and last month, reports Downstream Today, Pakistani Foreign Ministry spokesman Mohammad Sadiq said that, after a visit from Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iran-Pakistan-India (IPI) gas pipeline project is moving toward the "final stage" of its implementation. "The direction of the project is positive," said Sadiq at a weekly news briefing. The US$7.5-billion IPI gas pipeline project, which has been under discussions since 1994, is to deliver natural gas from Iran to Pakistan and India. Last month, the long-stalled talks on the gas pipeline project made a breakthrough when Ahmadinejad made whistle-stop visits to Pakistan and India. The three countries are expected to sign agreements on the IPI project soon.

Yikes, foiled again, outflanked by Iran? Again, there are options. The IPI pipeline wouldn't of course pass through war-torn Afghanistan but it would pass through Balochistan, the largest of Pakistan's provinces and the scene of recent unrest including pipeline bombings. (I wonder who financed the unrest?) In fact, Balochistan might opt to become an independent state if it is not granted provincial autonomy, Senate Deputy Chairman Jan Muhammad Jamali said recently. “The time is running out ... there is no other option left but to grant provincial autonomy to all the provinces including Balochistan,” Jamali told the Upper House while speaking on a point of order. He said he had been forced to raise the voice of the people of his province, as the situation was rapidly deteriorating. “The four brothers (provinces) will not be able to live together if the situation remains the same,” he added.

Is there any chance that Jamali's threats might come true? Do the Jamalis have any clout? Could Pakistan break up? It's possible. The Jamali family has in the past collaborated with the CIA and the ISI (Pakistan Intelligence) in countering the activities of two other tribes and their Marxist influence in Balochistan. During the course of this collaboration, Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali became friendly with Nancy Powell (no relation to Colin), who was then a young member of the diplomatic corps in Pakistan and then served as US ambassador to Pakistan 2002–2004. She is currently the ambassador to Nepal.

An independent Balochistan would balkanize Pakistan, create a US-friendly state between Iran and India, and hurt Iran badly by stymieing the IPI pipeline. It would also provide a side benefit by isolating the large new port that the Chinese are financing in Gwadar, on Balochistan's coast. In March 2002, Chinese vice premier Wu Bangguo laid the foundation for Gwadar port, which is intended be a key Chinese facility on the Arabian Sea, not far from the Persian Gulf and the Strait of Hormuz. The US might consider this a threat to The Carter Doctrine, which dictates that the US shall be the big dog in the Middle East.

Operation Enduring Freedom? With John McCain and Barack Obama now arguing about widening the Afghanistan war and invading Pakistan, the TAPI natural gas pipeline has a better chance than freedom ever had. It would be an American-controlled cash cow that would hurt Iran. All the US needs to do is pacify Afghanistan with more troops (to safeguard TAPI) and balkanize Pakistan (to stymie IPI) while widening the war and antagonizing India. Freedom be damned. Freedom was never an option anyhow, especially when there's money to be made by endless war.

June 20, 2008

Don Bacon [send him mail] is a retired army officer who founded the Smedley Butler Society several years ago because, as General Butler said, "war is a racket."

Copyright © 2008 LewRockwell.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Moon-in-Taurus
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 22 Oct 2008
Posts: 104
Location: Surrey

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 11:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

During the question and answer session which followed David Ray Griffin's 9/11 lecture in London the other evening, one questioner told of a friend of his, a Frenchman I think, who had been part of a geological survey in Afghanistan some years ago, was it 25?

He said his friend had told him that Afghanistan was "floating on oil".

He asked David Ray Griffin if he was aware of this oil. Mr Griffin said that he was aware of it, and so were many other people in the United States.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Thermate911
Angel - now passed away
Angel - now passed away


Joined: 16 Jul 2007
Posts: 1451
Location: UEMS

PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moon-in-Taurus wrote:
He said his friend had told him that Afghanistan was "floating on oil".


Here's a good place to start getting the 'facts':-

http://energy.usgs.gov/international/

That's assuming you can tolerate the hyper-hypocrisy...

_________________
"We will lead every revolution against us!" - attrib: Theodor Herzl

"Timely Demise to All Oppressors - at their Convenience!" - 'Interesting Times', Terry Pratchett
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Moon-in-Taurus
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 22 Oct 2008
Posts: 104
Location: Surrey

PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Thermate, that was a bit of an eye-opener, pass the brandy, open the cigars won't you just.. Peak oil? Ha.
Rather explains why the people living there have been having such a lousy time for years.
http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1253/
Quote:
Assessment of Undiscovered Technically Recoverable Conventional Petroleum Resources of Northern Afghanistan

By T.R. Klett, G.F. Ulmishek, C.J. Wandrey, Warren F. Agena, and the U.S. Geological Survey-Afghanistan Ministry of Mines and Industry Joint Oil and Gas Resource Assessment Team Geographic Information Systems, spatial data management, and petroleum-generation modeling by Douglas Steinshouer

Abstract
Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey - Afghanistan Ministry of Mines and Industry Joint Oil and Gas Resource Assessment Team estimated mean volumes of undiscovered petroleum in northern Afghanistan; the resulting estimates are 1.6 billion barrels (0.2 billion metric tons) of crude oil, 16 trillion cubic feet (0.4 trillion cubic meters) of natural gas, and 0.5 billion barrels (0.8 billion metric tons) of natural gas liquids. Most of the undiscovered crude oil is in the Afghan-Tajik Basin and most of the undiscovered natural gas is in the Amu Darya Basin.
Four total petroleum systems were identified, and these were subdivided into eight assessment units for the purpose of this resource assessment. The area with the greatest potential for undiscovered natural gas accumulations is in Upper Jurassic carbonate and reef reservoirs beneath an impermeable salt layer in relatively unexplored parts of northern Afghanistan. The Afghan-Tajik Basin has the greatest potential for undiscovered crude oil accumulations, and these are potentially in Cretaceous to Paleogene carbonate reservoir rocks associated with thrust faulting and folding.

Smoke
1.6 billion barrels (0.2 billion metric tons) of crude oil,
16 trillion cubic feet (0.4 trillion cubic meters) of natural gas,
and 0.5 billion barrels (0.8 billion metric tons) of natural gas liquids.


Shhh...

It does seem rather a lot.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
chek
Mega Poster
Mega Poster


Joined: 12 Sep 2006
Posts: 3889
Location: North Down, N. Ireland

PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2009 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moon-in-Taurus wrote:

1.6 billion barrels (0.2 billion metric tons) of crude oil,
16 trillion cubic feet (0.4 trillion cubic meters) of natural gas,
and 0.5 billion barrels (0.8 billion metric tons) of natural gas liquids.

Shhh...

It does seem rather a lot.


Everything is relative - even when talking in billions.

Given that usually a third of oil is unrecoverable (but new technology might reduce that to 25%) and the US burns its way through 6.6 billion barrels of oil alone per year, it ain't that much at all.
maps.unomaha.edu/Peterson/funda/Sidebar/OilConsumption.html

_________________
Dissolution of the Global Corporations.
It's the only way.

It's them or us.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Disco_Destroyer
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 05 Sep 2006
Posts: 6342

PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2009 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dGuFfMZS8U


Link

_________________
'Come and see the violence inherent in the system.
Help, help, I'm being repressed!'


“The more you tighten your grip, the more Star Systems will slip through your fingers.”


www.myspace.com/disco_destroyer
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Disco_Destroyer
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 05 Sep 2006
Posts: 6342

PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2009 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also somewhat linked if not more far reaching Rolling Eyes

Moscow warns of future energy wars


Russia, the world's biggest gas producer, believes conflicts could arise over resources [GALLO/GETTY]

Russia has warned that military conflicts over energy resources could erupt along its borders in the near future, as the race to secure oil and gas reserves gains momentum.

A Kremlin policy paper, which maps out Russia's main challenges to national security for the next decade, said "problems that involve the use of military force cannot be excluded" in competition for resources.

The National Security Strategy's release coincides with a deadline for countries around the world to submit sea bed ownership claims to a United Nations commission, including for the resource-rich Arctic.

The paper, signed off by Dmitry Medvedev, Russia's president, says international relations in the next 10 years will be shaped by battles over energy reserves.

"The attention of international politics in the long-term perspective will be concentrated on the acquisition of energy resources," it said.

In depth

The Arctic fight for survival
Gallery: Arctic adventure
Video: The Arctic scramble
From the edge of the world

"Amid competitive struggle for resources, attempts to use military force to solve emerging problems can't be excluded.

"The existing balance of forces near the borders of the Russian Federation and its allies can be violated," it added.

The document said regions including the Middle East, the Barents Sea, the Arctic, the Caspian Sea and Central Asia could all be at the centre of competing claims for resources.

Russia, the world's biggest natural gas producer, has already accused the United States, with which it shares a small sea border, of coveting its mineral wealth.

But Moscow is also finding its control over natural gas exports under threat, as the European Union seeks alternative supply routes that would bypass Russia and the Ukraine.

The country is also embroiled in a territorial dispute with Norway over claims to the Arctic sea bed, where around 25 per cent of the world's untapped reserves are believed to lie underneath the ice.

Global security threats

The National Security Strategy also pointed to the US and Nato as major threats to global security.

It criticised a US plan to deploy a global missile shield in Eastern Europe, which has already infuriated Russia.

"The opportunity to uphold global and regional security will substantially narrow if elements of the US worldwide missile defence system are deployed in Europe," the document said.

But it added Russia would pursue a "rational and pragmatic" foreign policy and avoid a new arms race.

The document said Moscow would seek an "equal and full-fledged strategic partnership" with Washington "on the basis on coinciding interests".

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/europe/2009/05/2009513141243951766.h tml

_________________
'Come and see the violence inherent in the system.
Help, help, I'm being repressed!'


“The more you tighten your grip, the more Star Systems will slip through your fingers.”


www.myspace.com/disco_destroyer
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Whitehall_Bin_Men
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 2540
Location: Westminster, LONDON, SW1A 2HB.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When foreign policy is well-reasoned, we see attention given to humanitarian issues like housing, jobs, health care and education. When that policy consists of applying a military solution to a political problem, however, we see death, destruction, and suffering. Director Robert Greenwald witnessed the latter during his recent trip to Afghanistan--the devastating consequences of U.S. airstrikes on thousands of innocent civilians.

The footage you are about to see is poignant, heart-wrenching, and often a direct result of U.S. foreign policy.


Link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krHV9iT20zw

We must help the refugees whose lives have been shattered by U.S. foreign policy and military attacks. Support the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan, an organization dedicated to helping women and children, human rights issues, and social justice. Then, become a Peacemaker. Receive up-to-the-minute information through our new mobile alert system whenever there are Afghan civilian casualties from this war, and take immediate action by calling Congress.

http://rethinkafghanistan.com/

Digg this video:
http://digg.com/world_news/Video_of_Casualties_Will_Piss_You_Off_and_B reak_Your_Heart_2

and this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UX7Xn9Zp0M

_________________
--
'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com
http://aanirfan.blogspot.com
Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A British Army officer has launched a devastating attack on the UK's "failing" strategy in Afghanistan.
By Sean Rayment - 20 Jun 2009 - Daily Telegraph

The officer, who works in defence intelligence, has described the British presence in Helmand as an "unmitigated disaster" fuelled by "lamentable" government spin and naïvety.

Writing in the British Army Review, an official MoD publication, Major SN Miller, stated: "Lets not kid ourselves. To date Operation Herrick [the British codename for the War in Afghanistan] has been a failure".

He claimed that hundreds of millions of pounds of taxpayers money had been wasted on a war which had failed to deliver any real reconstruction, governance or security.

Rather than "winning hearts and minds", Major Miller, who serves in the Defence Intelligence Staff serving Intelligence Corps, said the British presence had had the opposite effect.

But his most blistering attack was on the UK's counter-narcotics policy, where the illicit sale of drugs has been successfully used by the Taliban to fund the insurgency and kill British troops...........

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/afghanistan/5587822/Bri tish-Army-officer-launches-stinging-attack-on-failing-UK-strategy-in-A fghanistan.html

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Thermate911
Angel - now passed away
Angel - now passed away


Joined: 16 Jul 2007
Posts: 1451
Location: UEMS

PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
But his most blistering attack was on the UK's counter-narcotics policy, where the illicit sale of drugs has been successfully used by the Taliban to fund the insurgency and kill British troops...........


Can't let that scurrilous piece of disinfo pass!
http://opioids.com/afghanistan/index.html
Quote:
JALALABAD, Afghanistan (February 15, 2001 8:19 p.m. EST

U.N. drug control officers said the Taliban religious militia has nearly wiped out opium production in Afghanistan -- once the world's largest producer -- since banning poppy cultivation last summer.

A 12-member team from the U.N. Drug Control Program spent two weeks searching most of the nation's largest opium-producing areas and found so few poppies that they do not expect any opium to come out of Afghanistan this year.

"We are not just guessing. We have seen the proof in the fields," said Bernard Frahi, regional director for the U.N. program in Afghanistan and Pakistan. He laid out photographs of vast tracts of land cultivated with wheat alongside pictures of the same fields taken a year earlier -- a sea of blood-red poppies.


A graph is worth x number of words?


http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=3294
Quote:
The United Nations has announced that opium poppy cultivation in Afghanistan has soared and is expected to increase by 59% in 2006. The production of opium is estimated to have increased by 49% in relation to 2005.

The Western media in chorus blame the Taliban and the warlords. The Bush administration is said to be committed to curbing the Afghan drug trade: "The US is the main backer of a huge drive to rid Afghanistan of opium... "

Yet in a bitter irony, US military presence has served to restore rather than eradicate the drug trade.

What the reports fail to acknowledge is that the Taliban government was instrumental in implementing a successful drug eradication program, with the support and collaboration of the UN.

Implemented in 2000-2001, the Taliban's drug eradication program led to a 94 percent decline in opium cultivation. In 2001, according to UN figures, opium production had fallen to 185 tons. Immediately following the October 2001 US led invasion, production increased dramatically, regaining its historical levels. ... ... ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opium_Production_in_Afghanistan#Intersect ion_with_the_War_on_Terror

from: http://www.vimeo.com/774707
Quote:
Afghanistan has seen a high rate of opium addiction among refugees returning from Iran and Afghanistan.[21] Afghan filmmaker Jawed Taiman in his film Addicted In Afghanistan attributes this to the presence of U.S. troops, claiming that opium addiction was significantly lower under Communist and Taliban rule.


UNODC is NOT to be trusted with genuine figures, IMO.
http://www.unodc.org/pdf/research/AFG07_ExSum_web.pdf

----
For first timers:-

The gross irony is that the criminals running this biggest of death and misery rackets are the leading proponents of draconian drug laws. Legalising this vile trade would wipe billion$ off their profit. It would also save lives, from Afghanistan to Colombia...

_________________
"We will lead every revolution against us!" - attrib: Theodor Herzl

"Timely Demise to All Oppressors - at their Convenience!" - 'Interesting Times', Terry Pratchett
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pugwash
Moderate Poster
Moderate Poster


Joined: 04 Dec 2007
Posts: 226
Location: Buckinghamshire

PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Correct me if I'm wrong.

Quote:
U.N. drug control officers said...

Quote:
..pictures of the same fields taken a year earlier -- a sea of blood-red poppies.


..blood-red poppies? Aren't the poppies used in the trade white.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2009 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brilliant Guardian article, from embedded journalist, about the futility of the entire Afghan mission. How times have changed.
The only people who don't get it are our nation's decision makers.
Who are busily and traitorously preparing the way for some sort of New Order.

Battle of Babaji: A fight for hearts and minds in Afghanistan, but none are to be found
Soldiers from the Black Watch on patrol in a Viking APC in Helmand province, Afghanistan

The plan was simple: with overwhelming force, the British soldiers would arrive in Babaji – one of the most dangerous insurgent strongholds in southern Afghanistan - and scare away the local Taliban without a fight, leaving a permanent military presence in the area for the first time, winning over local people and persuading them to stand up to their Taliban masters .

But Operation Panchai Palang (Panther's Claw) – the biggest air assault mounted by British troops since 2001, involving hundreds of soldiers being dropped from Chinooks – did not go quite according to plan.



The aim was to claim a lawless part of Afghanistan's troublesome south for the distant and disliked government far away in Kabul. They would seize the area, put up fortifications to limit movement and impose some order and authority.

But, despite the strict secrecy that cloaked the operation, the local people seemed to have got wind of it and – scared by the prospect of intense fighting – voted with their feet.

The day before the soldiers began their operation, drones monitoring the area showed people evacuating their homes, leaving Babaji in the hands of militants.

During the first three days of their two-week stay in the area, which will end when troops from the Welsh Guards relieve them, the men of the Black Watch battalion endured persistent attacks of small arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades. With the enemy hiding at a distance, in bushes and abandoned compounds, most soldiers never saw their foes. Only the snipers and the men monitoring the live video feeds from circling drones got sight of their quarry.

"They are so well camouflaged you can't see anything," said Rob Colquoun, a section leader, in charge of a team of snipers who killed 18 Afghans in one afternoon.

Insurgents had also laid a number of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in advance of the troops' arrival, often marked rather obviously by piles of rocks as a warning to local people. As a result, patrols were forced to move at the pace of a soldier waving a metal detector back and forth. Some protection was afforded by the vehicles used to scoot around the battlefield, including Vikings – sauna-like metal boxes on caterpillar tracks whose fetid interiors made the heat of high noon in Helmand feel like a refreshing breeze.

"There is nothing worse for soldiers' morale than suffering casualties without being able to inflict them on the enemy," said Major Al Steele, the commander of B Company.

The night before the Black Watch set off, the troops watched a gut-wrenchingly moving photographic tribute to a young private killed on 12 June, killed by an IED that was placed in a position the insurgents guessed a soldier would rush into when under fire.

The slideshow, projected on to a huge screen on the wall in the battalion's Camp Gordon headquarters, featured pictures of Robert McLaren in the field, and of the repatriation of his union flag-draped coffin back to Scotland.

With those images seared on their brains, the men, weighed down with weapons, ammunition and the rations that would sustain them for the coming 24 hours, wolfed down a meal of greasy hamburger and chips before clambering aboard the Chinooks that would take them for the seven-minute hop to Babaji. Served up amid the dust of the Afghan desert, it was the last cooked meal most of the soldiers would have for 11 days.

With the normal seats stowed away, the Jocks – as the men are known – arranged themselves on the floors of the helicopters, legs tucked around the man in front of them and the bulky rifles, rocket launchers, radios and other kit.

As the powerful engines gathered speed, the eerie green cabin lights were cut – leaving them in darkness, save for the occasional flash of anti-missile flares detonated from the side of the helicopters – and the Chinooks headed away from Bastion, the vast British base in Helmand, for the heart of green zone, the irrigated farmland that is home to swaths of poppy fields and large numbers of Taliban insurgents.

From Kandahar airfield to the east came another six of the massive twin-rotor helicopters, all equally crammed.

"We are dropping 340 people in one wave, with 30 seconds' notice. The Chinooks will then take off and they are not coming back," said Lt Col Stephen Cartwright, commanding the men preparing to go into battle.

After their short journey the soldiers spread out into the areas surrounding the helicopter landing zones. The first sign of resistance – 15 men carrying a belt-fed anti-aircraft machine gun – was quickly spotted and dealt with by the constellation of planes, helicopters and unmanned drones circling the night skies. The men were annihilated by an attack from the sky of which they could have had no warning.

"Serves them right. They weren't out doing the shopping, were they?" said a voice in the darkness, watching through night vision goggles.

With British Chinooks in short supply (six were on loan from the Americans), the simultaneous landing of 10 helicopters was a rare event, testament to the huge importance placed on the operation and the enormous risks involved.

A shortage of troops and equipment has long hampered the three-year British deployment in Helmand, all but barring a major attempt such as Operation Panchai Palang to install a permanent troop presence in such a hostile area. But the arrival of 21,000 Americans into the south, including Helmand, has made it possible for the British to free up troops elsewhere and concentrate their efforts in smaller areas.

The first victim of the operation was an Afghan national army soldier accompanying the British, who was killed after he wandered into an area that had not been cleared for IEDs.

"It's bad that it happens – but it's a weird feeling of relief that it's not one of us. A lot of people feel guilty about that," said Captain Mike Goodall.

Because getting the local people onside was the most important aspect of the mission, enormous pains were taken to avoid using the more destructive weapons systems in the British arsenal.

"I never use mortars – they are good for raising the morale of the troops, but you risk injuring civilians," said Major Steele. "When, later, we meet the village elder of the family of a child that we have killed, it just sours everything and undermines everything we are trying to do."

However, the inhabitants of Babaji showed little interest in meeting the British, with compound after mud-walled compound abandoned.

The box of pencil cases, school bags and other goodies known in military jargon as "consent-winning goods" was left undistributed and the bazaar that had been one of the main targets of the operation, because its role in the local opium industry made it a "key insurgent logistics and financing node", was deserted.

The wide street, lined on each side with garage-like concrete alcoves that serve for shops, was strewn with rubbish and, the Jocks discovered, eight separate IEDs. The only people in the shops were youthful members of A Company, who spent their time frying up some of the potatoes the traders left behind.

In a place like Babaji, where the flags of officialdom are the white banners of the Taliban fluttering above key buildings, the usual mixture of grocers and tailors is mixed in with shops peddling drug processing equipment, needles for local addicts, and pharmacies with field dressings and morphine suggesting they do good business with local fighters.

By the end of the second day the lack of local engagement was beginning to worry the officers.

"Running around, getting into fights and killing a few enemy is all very well and good, but my main concern at the moment is that we haven't talked to any local nationals or really got out our main message to the community that this time we are here to stay," said Major Steele.

His company finally found two local people to engage with on the fourth day – an exercise that required the troops to start walking into a nearby village at 2am, under the cover of darkness, across fields of poppy stubble and irrigation ditches, and then retreat in armoured vehicles.

The first was a teenage boy caught foraging for stale bread in an empty compound whose constantly shifting story suggested to the British that he might have been an insurgent sympathiser or even a "dicker" – a watchman providing a steady stream of intelligence on the movements of foreign forces.

The second was a grey-bearded old man the British found sitting under a tree, outside a tiny mud-brick home the size of two telephone boxes – the only inhabitant of an otherwise entirely deserted village to have stayed behind. Only his bad legs, and the trouble he has walking, had prevented him joining the exodus.

No fewer than three British officers set about trying to extract information and to deliver their key messages.

Major Steele tried to reassure him by pointing to the British effort in Musa Qala, a town in northern Helmand which UK forces helped to dislodge from Taliban control in late 2007 and have been painstakingly trying to stabilise ever since.

The old man wasn't having any of it: "Last year a big British bomb in Nowzad killed 600 people," he said. "Another 170 were killed at a wedding party."

Major Steele tried using a story about a recent battle group operation in an area that saw the fiercest fighting of their tour. "I was in the Upper Sangin Valley recently where there was heavy fighting and there were several occasions when I had the opportunity to kill enemies of the peace, and some I did kill because they are not friends of Islam, but others we could not because there was a danger that we would hurt innocent civilians.

"In order for you to help properly we need your help. I know it is very difficult and the elders here will potentially risk their lives to come and talk to us." But the old man dismissed the idea that the British could bring security where so many others have failed.

"I'm 80 years old and I have seen many governments and none of them have been any help. Why should I believe that this one will help?"

Conscious of the need to get back to their recently established forward operating base, set up in an abandoned compound before they were attacked, the British officer gave up on the old man with a resigned smile.

"I understand your scepticism, but all you need to know is that this is the next area we are trying to improve. I hope we can prove you wrong, but it will take a long time."

Despite the limited success of the effort to engage the residents, the mood back at the base was buoyant after the expected stiff resistance to their presence in the village failed to materialise. Small arms fire on the compound the British had taken over allowed the men to strip off and swim in the canal behind the building.

Part of the reason was the dropping from a B1 bomber of a 500lb bomb on to a compound from which there had been day-long fire.

"We had no choice," said Major Rupert Whitelegge . "Every time he would fire a shot to initiate an attack, he would drop down behind his enormous 3ft-thick wall. We just couldn't get through and so we dropped the bomb. It's been very quiet today, strangely."

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
QuitTheirClogs
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 09 Feb 2007
Posts: 630
Location: Manchester

PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2009 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

U.S. Faces Resentment in Afghan Region

Quote:
“The people are very scared of the night raids,” said Spin Gul, a local farmer. “When they have night raids, the people join the Taliban and fight.”

“Who are the Taliban? They are local people,” interjected another man, who did not give his name. One man, Hamza, said he would fight if foreigners raided his house. “I will not allow them,” he said. “I will fight them to the last drop of blood.”


By Carlotta Gall – New York Times - July 3, 2009
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/03/world/asia/03helmand.html

LASHKAR GAH, Afghanistan — The mood of the Afghan people has tipped into a popular revolt in some parts of southern Afghanistan, presenting incoming American forces with an even harder job than expected in reversing military losses to the Taliban and winning over the population.

Villagers in some districts have taken up arms against foreign troops to protect their homes or in anger after losing relatives in airstrikes, several community representatives interviewed said. Others have been moved to join the insurgents out of poverty or simply because the Taliban’s influence is so pervasive here.

On Thursday morning, 4,000 American Marines began a major offensive to try to take back the region from the strongest Taliban insurgency in the country. The Marines are part of a larger deployment of additional troops being ordered by the new American commander in Afghanistan, Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, to concentrate not just on killing Taliban fighters but on protecting the population.

_________________
Simon - http://www.patriotsquestion911.com/

David Ray Griffin - 9/11: the Myth & the Reality
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-275577066688213413
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr Barnet was a must-read author when I was studying for the Army Staff College, and he has lost nothing in the years which have passed since. I agree with every word he has written, and James Mackie of Edinburgh has endorsed. Get our troops out, or give them everything they need to succeed, including more manpower. Montgomery refused to settle for less in North Africa, why should our soldiers do so now.

Who has the guts to pull out? By Correlli Barnet
Last updated at 3:28 AM on 11th July 2009
Comments (82) Add to My Stories Yesterday came the truly tragic news that eight of our young soldiers had been killed in a single Taliban ambush.

We had already lost seven men in as many days. The total of British dead in Afghanistan since Tony Blair took Britain into this misconceived adventure in November 2001 alongside George W Bush now stands at 184.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-1198976/Who-guts-pull-out.ht ml

Gordon Brown yesterday warned that there will be many more young Britons killed and wounded in the hard campaigning to come - though whether that campaigning may last for weeks, months or years he refused to say. And for what purpose are these brave young men losing limbs and even life?

For what purpose are their families suffering such grief? It is certainly not in the cause of liberating British people living in a British sovereign territory, as during the Falklands War in 1982.
Instead, the Prime Minister, other ministers or anonymous spokespersons in the Ministry of Defence (almost certainly civilian bureaucrats) give us various glib, but quite simply unbelievable, justifications for our ever more bloody military entanglement in Afghanistan.
They say our soldiers are dying in order to achieve peace and stability in Afghanistan in time for presidential elections in November, in which that politically impotent clown 'President' Karzai will stand again.
These elections are supposed to mark an important step towards the stated long-term Western objective in Afghanistan - a stable democratic regime ruling a united country.
What a hope! Afghanistan is an ancient society of fierce tribal rivalries and has no democratic 'DNA' whatsoever.
How can pursuit of the Westernliberal fantasy of Afghanistan as a future democracy justify the loss of a single British soldier's life?
Then again, we are told that our occupation forces 'are winning hearts and minds' among the local people, when the truth is that support for the Taliban is growing.
Only a fool would believe that villagers are won over by foreign soldiers in full combat gear fighting house-by-house and calling in air-strikes that kill women and children instead of Taliban.
I say 'foreign' soldiers, but the better word would be 'alien', given that very few of them are Muslim or Asian, and most are Christians and of European or American nationality.
They must make much the same impression on the locals as Taliban fighters in black turbans and draped with machine-guns would make on entering a Norfolk village.

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Thermate911
Angel - now passed away
Angel - now passed away


Joined: 16 Jul 2007
Posts: 1451
Location: UEMS

PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A clear example of the endless propaganda war:-



When bankers and oilmen run wars of aggression with no humane idealogical outcome, the home deaths always seem utterly pointless, however larged up.

Word from the troops on the ground:-
http://www.mathaba.net/news/?x=621084

and a useful commentary:-
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2009/07/its-not-just-afghanistan-its-eve rywhere.html

_________________
"We will lead every revolution against us!" - attrib: Theodor Herzl

"Timely Demise to All Oppressors - at their Convenience!" - 'Interesting Times', Terry Pratchett
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Thermate911
Angel - now passed away
Angel - now passed away


Joined: 16 Jul 2007
Posts: 1451
Location: UEMS

PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2009 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's an interesting development in the making:-

http://cryptogon.com/?p=9879

Quote:
SOLDIER REFUSES TO DEPLOY TO AFGHANISTAN ON ORDER OF FOREIGN BORN PRESIDENT, U.S. ARMY REVOKES ORDER RATHER THAN FORCE THE ISSUE IN COURT
July 15th, 2009


UPDATE: Retired Army Two Star General and Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Now Involved

From the revised injunction with the new plaintiffs added:

Plaintiff Major Stefan Frederick Cook previously received from the Defendants in this cause what appear to be facially valid orders from Colonel Wanda L. Good mobilizing him to active duty with the United States Army in Afghanistan on July 15-18, 2009 (Exhibit A). Plaintiff filed his Original Application for TRO on Friday July 10, 2009, and on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 his deployment to Afghanistan was revoked by order of Colonel Louis B. Wingate, apparently Col. Good’s successor at Army Human Resources Command in St. Louis (Exhibit B). This unexpected action does not in any way, shape or form, “moot” the application for TRO, which is here amended and resubmitted as an Application for Preliminary Injunction, covering both the possibility of future orders and to prevent negative collateral consequences such as retaliation against Major Stefan Frederick Cook (which have already begun) including possible violations of the general Federal and specific military whistleblower acts, as well as the First and Ninth Amendment civil rights of Major Stefan Frederick Cook to challenge the chain of command in the U.S military. It is obvious that this case has the potential to be converted into a class action on behalf of all military servicemen and women who require the means of establishing the legality of their orders with certainty. ... ... ...

_________________
"We will lead every revolution against us!" - attrib: Theodor Herzl

"Timely Demise to All Oppressors - at their Convenience!" - 'Interesting Times', Terry Pratchett
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
fish5133
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 13 Sep 2006
Posts: 2562
Location: One breath from Glory

PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2009 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes indeed, lets hope it goes all the way.
_________________
JO911B.
"for we wrestle not against flesh and blood but against principalities, against powers, against rulers of the darkness of this world, against wicked spirits in high places " Eph.6 v 12
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2009 1:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bribery and fraud at heart of defense contracting work in Iraq and Afghanistan
By Wayne Madsen
Online Journal Contributing Writer
Jul 28, 2009, 00:17

(WMR) -- WMR has learned from a knowledgeable contractor who served in Iraq and Afghanistan that a number of large U.S. defense contractors have been involved in questionable deals to land major contracts in countries that made up the “Coalition of the Willing” that invaded and occupied Iraq.

The companies named by the contractor include Booz Allen of McLean, Virginia, where Donald Rumsfeld’s Comptroller Dov Zakheim took a job after resigning in 2004; Lockheed Martin; and VSE Corporation of Alexandria, Virginia. In December 2003, a Government Accountability Office (GAO) audit concluded that there was $1.6 billion in lost funds from the war in Iraq and on information technology contracts.

VSE provided “support services” to the U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan.

WMR has learned that VSE and Lockheed Martin’s Tokyo representative were involved in distributing $2 million in “black funds” to bribe South Korean diplomats and politicians who were involved in crafting an international arms tender from South Korea to purchase from the United States F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jets fitted with Lockheed Martin’s Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night (LANTIRN) system. The competitors on the potential $7 billion contract with South Korea included companies representing the Eurofighter, as well as the Russians.

The back room dealing primarily occurred in 2006 and the U.S. embassy in Seoul helped in arranging payments of untraceable cash for several South Korean politicians. The U.S. ambassador to South Korea at the time was Alexander Vershbow, who was nominated in March 2009 by President Obama as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security, a post in which Vershbow oversees foreign military sales.........

http://onlinejournal.com/artman/publish/article_4953.shtml

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2009 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't mean to be prejudiced but new kid on the war crimes block General Sir David Richards sounds like a barrow boy. Has he had an education?


Army chief Sir David Richards predicts 40 more years fighting Taliban in Afghanistan

Are our soldiers his 'human resources' to be deployed? This is his only appearance on YouTube so far.
Highlights from the Human Resources Directors Business Summit 2009 which included inspirational keynote sessions from Dr. Edward de Bono, General Sir David Richards and motivational expert Chester Elton.
What a horrible bunch of people at this conference, vying with each other to be the most fake.

Link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6C4DZGWNLw

http://www.bcfm.org.uk/wp-content/Podcasts/20090807170001.mp3

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Death takes UK Afghan toll to 200
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8203711.stm
It's the Mafia stupid!
Who is funding the Afghan Taliban? You don't want to know.
Reuters - http://www.legitgov.org/
"I was building a bridge," an Afghan contactor said, one evening over drinks. "The local Taliban commander called and said 'don't build a bridge there, we'll have to blow it up.' I asked him to let me finish the bridge, collect the money -- then they could blow it up whenever they wanted. We agreed, and I completed my project." Who is funding the Afghan Taliban? You don't want to know. 13 Aug 2009.
In Afghanistan, one of the richest sources of Taliban funding is the foreign assistance coming into the country. Virtually every major project includes a healthy cut for the insurgents. Call it protection money, call it extortion, or, as the Taliban themselves prefer to term it, "spoils of war," the fact remains that international donors, primarily the United States, are to a large extent financing their own enemy... The manager of an Afghan firm with lucrative construction contracts with the U.S. government builds in a minimum of 20 percent for the Taliban in his cost estimates. The manager, who will not speak openly, has told friends privately that he makes in the neighborhood of $1 million per month. Out of this, $200,000 is siphoned off for the insurgents.............
http://blogs.reuters.com/global/2009/08/13/who-is-funding-the-afghan-t aliban-you-dont-want-to-know/

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2009 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



Mass murder of Afghan infants by US, UK, NATO & Australia
News Type: Event — Sat Aug 15, 2009 11:35 AM EDT
http://gpolya.newsvine.com/_news/2009/08/15/3155459-mass-murder-of-afg han-infants-by-us-uk-nato-australia

Gideon Polya

The "annual death rate" for Afghan infants is about 7%, this proving what an utter sham "democracy" is in Occupied Afghanistan and the war criminality of the US Alliance Occupiers, the US, the UK, NATO and Australia.

According to UNICEF, 338,000 under-5 year old infants die every year in Occupied Afghanistan (see: http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/afghanistan.html ).

According to the UN Population Division the under-5 infant population of Occupied Afghanistan is about 5,000,000 (see: http://esa.un.org/unpp/p2k0data.asp ).

We can translate the above authoritative statistics into an "annual death rate" of 338,000 x 100/5,000,000 = 6.8% for Occupied Afghanistan under-5 year old infants i.e. about 7 out of every 100 Occupied Afghanistan under-5 year old infants die each year (90% avoidably and due to US Alliance war crimes - thus according to WHO (see: http://www.who.int/countries/usa/en/ ) the "total annual per capita health expenditure" the US Alliance permits in Occupied Afghanistan is only $29 as compared to $6,714 in the US ).

The "annual death rate" is about 7% for Occupied Afghan under-5 year old infants as compared to 3% (for inmates of the Nazi German Buchenwald Concentration Camp), 5% (for French Jews under Nazi German and French collaborationist Vichy regime), 10% (for Australian prisoners of war of the Japanese in WW2) and 17% (for Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe 1941-1945) (see: http://bellaciao.org/en/spip.php?article18881 ).

Would the Afghan parents and family members of these innocent victims willingly vote for puppets of the US Alliance mass murderers of Afghan children?

Would the World War 2 inmates of Buchenwald Concentration Camp, French Jews in Nazi-occupied France, Australian POWs of the Japanese or Jews of Nazi-occupied Europe have voted for representatives of their murderous captors and persecutors?

Articles 55 and 56 of the Geneva Convention Relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War (see: http://www.un-documents.net/gc-4.htm ) state that an Occupier must make requisite life-sustaining food and medical provisions "to the fullest extent of the means available to it" to its occupied subjects.


George Bush, Dick Cheney, Condoleezza Rice, Barack Hussein Obama (BHO), Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton, Tony Blair, George Brown, John Howard, Kevin Rudd, Stephen Harper, Nicolas Sarkozy, Angela Merkel and their war criminal associates and underlings should be arraigned before the International Criminal Court for war crimes, including the mass murder of children.

Post-invasion under-5 year old infant deaths in Occupied Afghanistan now total 2.3 million.

Thou shalt not kill children.



TonyGosling wrote:
Death takes UK Afghan toll to 200
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8203711.stm
It's the Mafia stupid!
Who is funding the Afghan Taliban? You don't want to know.
Reuters - http://www.legitgov.org/
"I was building a bridge," an Afghan contactor said, one evening over drinks. "The local Taliban commander called and said 'don't build a bridge there, we'll have to blow it up.' I asked him to let me finish the bridge, collect the money -- then they could blow it up whenever they wanted. We agreed, and I completed my project." Who is funding the Afghan Taliban? You don't want to know. 13 Aug 2009.
In Afghanistan, one of the richest sources of Taliban funding is the foreign assistance coming into the country. Virtually every major project includes a healthy cut for the insurgents. Call it protection money, call it extortion, or, as the Taliban themselves prefer to term it, "spoils of war," the fact remains that international donors, primarily the United States, are to a large extent financing their own enemy... The manager of an Afghan firm with lucrative construction contracts with the U.S. government builds in a minimum of 20 percent for the Taliban in his cost estimates. The manager, who will not speak openly, has told friends privately that he makes in the neighborhood of $1 million per month. Out of this, $200,000 is siphoned off for the insurgents.............
http://blogs.reuters.com/global/2009/08/13/who-is-funding-the-afghan-t aliban-you-dont-want-to-know/

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
cem
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 28 May 2008
Posts: 484

PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2009 8:18 pm    Post subject: Miliband: Three vital steps to rebuild Afghanistan Reply with quote

.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/afghanistan/6044570/Thr ee-vital-steps-to-rebuild-Afghanistan.html


Three vital steps to rebuild Afghanistan

by UK Foreign Minister David Miliband, Daily Telegraph, 18 August 2009

.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2009 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NATO wants a media blackout on all resistance fighter attacks during Thursday's (s)election so voters "are not scared to vote". What a bad joke that will make of the day's news coverage!
"Cheering voters turned out in their millions today as democracy was restored to the joyous nation of Afghanistan, now freed from the evil reign [presenter begins to sound on edge and hurry his reading as we hear the sound of loud explosions nearby] of the sexist Taliban terrorist warlords who the brave voters have decided can no longer give a home to Al Quaeda."

Chasing Mirages in Afghanistan

While scourging Iran over its recent questionable election, the United States is about to shamelessly stage-manage presidential elections in Afghanistan.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eric-margolis/chasing-mirages-in-afghan_ b_262187.html

This week's Afghan vote will be an elaborate piece of political theater designed to show increasingly uneasy Western voters that progress is being made in the war-torn nation after seven years of US-led occupation.

Westerners may be gulled, but most Afghans already believe they know who will win the vote: the candidate chosen by the United States and its NATO allies.

Voting will mostly be held in urban areas, under the guns of US and NATO troops. The countryside, ruled by Taliban, who are often local farmers moonlighting as fighters, is too dangerous for this electoral charade. Over half of Afghanistan is under Taliban influence by day, more by night.

The entire election and vote-counting election commission are financed and run by the US. So are leading candidates. Ten thousand Afghan mercenaries hired by the US will police the polls and intimidate voters. US-financed Afghan media are busy promoting Washington's candidates. Bribes and fake ballots are being lavishly dispensed, as the BBC reports.

It is a serious violation of US law for any foreign nations to contribute money to candidates or campaigns in American elections. But the US has spent hundreds of millions influencing political campaigns and votes in Iraq, Ukraine, Georgia, Iran, the West Bank, and now Afghanistan.

The Pashtun Taliban, a fiercely anti-Communist, religious movement, is banned from the election. Pashtun tribesmen form over half of Afghanistan's population but have been largely excluded from power by the US-led occupation.

When the US invaded Afghanistan in 2001, it backed the pro-Russian Tajiks of the north who were blood enemies of the Pashtun-dominated Taliban. A Russian general led the Tajik-Uzbek Northern Alliance into Kabul. The US quickly became the ally of the Afghan Communists. Today, Tajiks and their Uzbek allies continue to be the real power behind Karzai's wobbly throne and dominate the drug trade.

Taliban vows to fight the sham election, which it calls a tool of foreign occupation. Other nationalist and tribal groups battling Western occupation, notably Gulbadin Hekmatyar's Hisbi Islami and forces of Jalaladin Hakkani, are also excluded from the election.

In fact, all parties are banned; only individuals are allowed to run. This is a favorite tactic of non-democratic regimes, particularly the US-backed dictatorships of the Arab world.

Real power is held by the US-installed Afghan leader, Hamid Karzai, whose administration is being undermine by charges of egregious corruption and involvement in drug dealing.

Behind Karzai are two powerful warlords: former Communist secret police chief Mohammed Fahim, a Tajik, and the recently returned from exile Uzbek warlord, Rashid Dostam. These two pillars of the old Afghan Communist regime were arch henchmen of the former Soviet occupiers and notorious war criminals.

President Hamid Karzai's main `rival,' Abdullah Abdullah, fronts for the Russian and Iranian-backed Tajik Northern Alliance. Abdullah was an aide to the late Tajik warlord, Ahmad Shah Massoud, who is lionized in the West. It has been revealed that Massoud, who was assassinated just before 9/11, was a long-time `asset' of the Soviet KGB who secretly collaborated with Moscow against the Afghan mujahidin.

Technocrat Ashraf Gani is another supposedly leading candidate. Both Gani and Abdullah are expected to get high positions in any new government formed by Karzai. Their primary role is to give the impression of a genuine electoral contest.

The northern Tajiks and Uzbeks, traditional foes of the majority Pashtun, are in deeply cahoots with Russia, Iran and India, all of whom have designs on Afghanistan.

One fact is inescapable: there will never be peace in Afghanistan until the majority Pashtun are enfranchised and allowed to share power and money - and that means Taliban and its allies. The US, having foolishly allied itself with Afghanistan's minorities instead of its majority, now faces the consequences of this strategic blunder.

When the Soviets occupied Afghanistan from 1979-1989, they held fairer elections than the two US-run votes. Of course, the Soviet's man, Najibullah, won, but at least dissention was voiced and opposition parties were allowed a voice. In Washington's stage-managed Afghan votes, real opposition is excluded. The US used the same trick in Iraq's rigged elections.

When the Soviets installed their yes-men in power, we called them `puppets' and `Communist stooges.' When the West does it, our Quislings are hailed as `statesmen' and `democrats fighting for stability.'

The UN, which, in the words of a senior American diplomat, has become `a leading tool of US foreign policy,' is being used to validate the US-run election. The feeble current UN chief, Ban-Ki moon, was put into his job by Washington.

Meanwhile, the party-line North American media keeps lauding the vote. It has long-term memory loss.

In 1967, the `New York Times,' a vocal supporter of the war in Afghanistan, wrote of US-supervised elections in war-torn Vietnam, `83% of voters cast ballots...in a remarkably successful election...the keystone of President Johnson's policy of encouraging the growth of the constitutional process in Vietnam.'

The vote may be close, since so many Afghans dislike Karzai, forcing a runoff. Washington may impose a CIA-World Bank approved `CEO' on poor Karzai, making him a double figurehead.

Whoever wins, President Barack Obama will end up the real power of Afghanistan.

Ravaged Afghanistan needs genuine, honest elections, and patient national reconciliation, free of foreign manipulation. That's the only true road to peace and stability.

America has a great deal to teach Afghanistan about how to run clean elections and build the essential institutions of democracy. As I underline in my latest book, `American Raj,' democracy and good government are what America should be exporting to the Muslim World, not dictators, B-1 bombers, and Predators.

Running phony elections is unworthy of the United States and demeans its values and traditions. It makes a mockery of everything we preach around the globe.

Our arrant double standards is a leading cause of anti-Americanism. One example: while claiming to be fighting to bring democracy to Afghanistan, the US strongly backed the military dictatorship in Pakistan that facilitated the American war effort.


The way to real peace and stability in Afghanistan can only be through a national consensus and negotiated settlement that includes Taliban and its allies.

But President Obama is desperate for some sort of victory, though he cannot even properly define the term. Senior US generals warn of defeat in Afghanistan if the US garrison is not doubled. The conflict continues to spread into neighboring Pakistan. Americans are being prepared for a widening of the war `to defend Afghan democracy.'

The US and NATO watch in horror as their casualties sharply mount and they have nothing to show voters for the latest Afghan imperial misadventure but body bags and tantalizing mirages of Central Asia's fabled oil and gas.

Quote:

Fearing that violence may dampen turnout, the Foreign Ministry issued a statement Tuesday asking news organizations to avoid "broadcasting any incidence of violence" between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. on election day "to ensure the wide participation of the Afghan people." The statement did not spell out any penalties for those that do not comply.

The English version said media "are requested" to follow the guidelines. The version in the Afghan language Dari said broadcasting news or video from "terrorist attack" was "strictly forbidden."

It was unclear how the government intended to enforce the ban. Rachel Reid, the Afghanistan researcher for Human Rights Watch, said freedom of expression was enshrined in the Afghan constitution and that any attempt to censor the reporting would be "an unreasonable violation of press freedoms."

"Afghans have a right to know about the security threats that they face, and make their own assessments about security," Reid said.

Despite heightened security in Kabul and other major cities, a series of attacks in the capital, starting with a suicide bombing Saturday that killed seven people near the main gate of NATO headquarters, has raised doubts that Afghan authorities can guarantee security on election day.

In the Tuesday suicide attack, the bomber detonated an explosives-laden vehicle as a NATO convoy traveled along a major highway near a British military base on the eastern outskirts of Kabul. The alliance did not specify the nationality of the NATO soldier who was killed.

Two Afghans working for the U.N. were also killed and one was wounded, the U.N. mission here announced.

In a statement issued in New York, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said he was "deeply distressed" by news of the attack.

Zabiullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman, claimed responsibility for the blast in a telephone conversation with The Associated Press. He said the attack was "part of our routine operations" and not directly linked to the election.

British troops guarded the blast site as rescuers rushed the wounded to hospitals. An AP reporter saw British soldiers collecting what appeared to be body parts from the roof of an Afghan home. He also reported shouting matches between British troops and Afghan security personnel at the blast site.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hvWEqwq3CrRvaQCmt21M foYhjZJQD9A5IQ280

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's at moments like this that the Murdoch press reveals it's fascist heart
Plus insight here into the lives of the front line occupying soldiers

Taliban attacks leave poll soaked in Afghan blood - Times Online
NATO occupation leaves poll soaked in Afghan blood - Times Online
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/Afghanistan/article6806415 .ece

It is insulting to Afghans to declare their election a success - Guardian
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/aug/23/havana-marking-afg hanistan-election
Guardian wrote:

Words from the front line: the bloody truth of Helmand – by a combat soldier
The past eight weeks have been the army's worst time in Afghanistan since the US-led invasion eight years ago. Here, in his brutally frank diaries of life on the front line, a serving soldier records the bitter toll of death, and his anger and frustration at the lack of military and political support.........
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/aug/23/havana-marking-afg hanistan-election

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2009 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No-one has yet claimed responsibility for Tuesday's attack in the southern Afghan city of Kandahar, which is a stronghold of the Taliban.
The Taliban has comdemned the bombing and denied involvement in the attack that left at least 43 people dead.
The blast, which wounded at least 65 other people, took place outside a wedding hall in the southern city shortly after people were breaking their Ramadan fast.
The Afghan government now says it is sending the army in to take control of security in the city.

Link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3j3w6TOlvE

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2009 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Afghans mourn dead under outcry of NATO bombing
By Ameen Salarzai (AFP) – 6 hours ago

KUNDUZ, Afghanistan — Afghans on Saturday mourned the dead from a NATO bombing that killed scores of people and renewed an outcry over civilian casualties at the hands of Western troops in an eight-year war.

The air strike destroyed two fuel tankers hijacked by the Taliban at a time when witnesses said villagers had rushed towards the vehicles, carrying any container they could to collect free fuel at the insurgents' invitation.

Officials said the dead were mostly insurgents, but Afghan President Hamid Karzai -- leading the count in fraud-tainted elections -- said any targeting of civilians was unacceptable. His office said 90 people were killed and hurt.

Memorial prayers were heard Saturday in nearly a dozen villages for those killed in northern Kunduz province, where the atmosphere was highly charged, witnesses said.

A delegation from the defence and interior ministries travelled to Kunduz early Saturday to begin investigations ordered by President Hamid Karzai, an official said.

Zamari Bashari, interior ministry spokesman, said it was not yet known how many people were killed, nor how many were civilians.

Kunduz provincial police chief Abdul Razaq Yaqobi said 56 people were killed and 12 wounded, adding that "all of them were Taliban".

In the Kunduz hospital, where many of the injured were taken, Asmatullah was with his 10-year-old son Shafiullah, who he said had been with other children getting free fuel and whose legs were burned when the tankers were ignited.

Asmatullah, who like many Afghans uses one name, said he was awoken by the noise of the exploding tankers "and when I went there I saw all the world was covered by killed and wounded people".

"All the dead were Taliban," he said.

The Taliban released a statement saying none of its militiamen were among the casualties.

"When the planes came our men knew that they would bomb the area, so all our people left," said the statement, received by email.

The air strike has underscored the increasing Taliban presence in parts of the north straddling a new supply route for foreign troops coming through Tajikistan in order to minimise dependence on the volatile route from Pakistan.

The White House expressed "great concern" over the loss of civilian lives while European governments warned the raid risked undermining the NATO mission of 64,500 troops from more than 40 countries trying to defeat the Taliban.

Police and the interior ministry said up to 56 Taliban were killed and 10 more wounded, including a 12-year-old child, when a NATO air raid targeted the tankers after they were hijacked en route from Tajikistan to Kabul.

Mahbubullah Sayedi, a government spokesman in Kunduz gave the highest death toll, saying 90 people were killed, but said most were Taliban.

The insurgent militia, which frequently exaggerates its claims as part of its propaganda effort in an eight-year war against Western troops and the Afghan government, earlier said 150 villagers, most of them young boys, were killed.

The incident came four days after the US and NATO commander in Afghanistan submitted a review into the war, calling for a revised strategy to defeat the Taliban and reverse the country's "serious" situation.

The White House also said the incident would be investigated and NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen pledged to conduct a thorough investigation.

The International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) said it bombed two stolen fuel trucks spotted on the banks of the Kunduz river, saying a large number of insurgents were killed but expressing regret for "any unnecessary loss of human life".

Kunduz provincial governor Engineer Mohammed Omar, said a German military convoy was targeted by a suicide bomber on Saturday about five kilometres (three miles) outside Kunduz city.

He said a car packed with explosives was remotely detonated as two German armoured vehicles were passing, injuring three German soldiers.

ISAF had no further details of the attack but confirmed there were no deaths.

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2009 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Victims' families tell their stories following Nato airstrike in Afghanistan
'I took some flesh home and called it my son.'
The Guardian interviews 11 villagers
guardian.co.uk, Friday 11 September 2009 20.05 BST

At first light last Friday, in the Chardarah district of Kunduz province in northern Afghanistan, the villagers gathered around the twisted wreckage of two fuel tankers that had been hit by a Nato airstrike. They picked their way through a heap of almost a hundred charred bodies and mangled limbs which were mixed with ash, mud and the melted plastic of jerry cans, looking for their brothers, sons and cousins. They called out their names but received no answers. By this time, everyone was dead.

What followed is one of the more macabre scenes of this or any war. The grief-stricken relatives began to argue and fight over the remains of the men and boys who a few hours earlier had greedily sought the tanker's fuel. Poor people in one of the world's poorest countries, they had been trying to hoard as much as they could for the coming winter.

"We didn't recognise any of the dead when we arrived," said Omar Khan, the turbaned village chief of Eissa Khail. "It was like a chemical bomb had gone off, everything was burned. The bodies were like this," he brought his two hands together, his fingers curling like claws. "There were like burned tree logs, like charcoal.

"The villagers were fighting over the corpses. People were saying this is my brother, this is my cousin, and no one could identify anyone."

So the elders stepped in. They collected all the bodies they could and asked the people to tell them how many relatives each family had lost.

A queue formed. One by one the bereaved gave the names of missing brothers, cousins, sons and nephews, and each in turn received their quota of corpses. It didn't matter who was who, everyone was mangled beyond recognition anyway. All that mattered was that they had a body to bury and perform prayers upon.

"A man comes and says, 'I lost my brother and cousin', so we gave him two bodies," said Omar Khan. "Another says I lost five relatives, so we gave him five bodies to take home and bury. When we had run out of bodies we started giving them limbs, legs, arms, torsos." In the end only five families went away without anything. "Their sons are still missing."

Omar Khan's small eyes narrowed and his mouth formed a disgusted circle. "The smell was so bad. For three days I smelled of burned meat and fuel."

Omar Khan was one of 11 villagers the Guardian interviewed about the airstrike. We arrived in the region early this week with the intention of visiting the site of the attack, but the kidnapping of a New York Times journalist and the firefight that preceded his rescue, leaving four people dead, meant the journey there was too difficult. Instead the villagers came into the city to tell us their stories.

We sat around a table in the basement of a hotel, and one by one their accounts of the airstrike – which killed 70-100 people, making it one of the most devastating of the war – spilled out. The villagers said the Taliban had hijacked the fuel tankers at 7pm on Thursday evening and driven them off the main road to Kabul, through Ali Abad district, into their stronghold of Chardarah, to the south-west of Kunduz.

To reach Chardarah they had to ford a shallow river to avoid a bridge garrisoned by the Afghan army. But when they drove the trucks into the water they became stuck, so the Taliban summoned the people in the nearby villages to help.

Jamaludin, a 45-year-old farmer, had been praying in the mosque when he heard the sound of a tractor. "I went home and found that three of my brothers and my nephew had left with my tractor," he said. "I called my brother to ask him where they had gone. He said the Taliban had asked him to bring the tractor and help them pull a tanker." Jamaluddin was alarmed. "I asked him what tanker? It wasn't our business, let the Taliban bring their own tractors. I called him back an hour later. He said they couldn't get the trucks out and the Taiban wouldn't let him leave, so I went back to sleep."

Realising the tankers were stuck, the Taliban decided to siphon off the fuel and asked people to come and help themselves to the ghanima, the spoils of war. There would be free fuel for everyone.

Assadullah, a thin 19-year-old with a wisp of black hair falling on his forehead, got a call from a friend who said the Taliban were distributing free fuel.

"I took two fuel cans with me, I called my brother and a friend and we went. There was a full moon and we could see very clearly. There were a lot of people already there. They were pushing and shoving, trying to reach the tap to fill their jerry cans. We are poor people, and we all wanted to get some fuel for the winter.

"I filled my cans and moved away while my brother was pushing to fill his. I walked for a hundred, maybe two hundred metres."

It was about 1am on Friday that the aircraft attacked and incinerated the stolen fuel tankers. "There was a big light in the sky and then an explosion," Assadullah said. "I fell on my face. When I came to, there was thick smoke and I couldn't see anything. I called, I shouted for my brother but he didn't answer. I couldn't see him. There was fire everywhere and silence and bodies were burning."

He pulled up his long shirt to show me four small shrapnel bruises and two burns on his neck.

Jamaludin woke up at about 1am to start making food. It was Ramadan, and he had to prepare Sehur, the last meal before sunrise. "I called my brother again and told him I could hear lots of aeroplanes in the sky, why wasn't he back? He said he was bringing some fuel and would be home soon. I hung up and went into the courtyard, and then there was a big fire, like a big lamp in the middle of the sky. I called my brother again and his phone was off. I left home and ran towards the river. The smell of smoke was coming from there.

"When I got there I couldn't see my brother.I shouted for him. I saw some people carrying injured on their shoulders, then I went back home to pray and wait for the light."

Jan Mohammad, an old man with a white beard and green eyes, said angrily: "I ran, I ran to find my son because nobody would give me a lift. I couldn't find him."

He dropped his head on his palm that was resting on the table, and started banging his head against his white mottled hand. When he raised his head his eyes were red and tears were rolling down his cheek: "I couldn't find my son, so I took a piece of flesh with me home and I called it my son. I told my wife we had him, but I didn't let his children or anyone see. We buried the flesh as it if was my son."

He broke off, then shouted at the young Assadullah, who had knocked at the old man's house and told his son to come with them there was free fuel for everyone, "You destroyed my home", Assadu-llah turned his head and looked at the wall. "You destroyed my home," he shouted again. Jan Mohammad dropped his head again on his palm and rolled it left and right, his big gray turban moving like a huge pendulum, "Taouba [forgiveness]," he hissed. "People lost their fathers and sons for a little bit of fuel. Forgiveness."

Omar Khan, the village chief, was crying now and looking at the ceiling.

Fazel Muhamad a 48-year-old farmer with seven deep lines creasing his forehead and a white prayers cap, threw two colour passport pictures in front of me, one of a thickly bearded man and the other a young boy. "My cousin and his son," he said. "Around 10pm, my cousin told me the Taliban were distributing fuel to the people and he was going to get some for the winter. I asked him to stay and not go, there were planes and it was dangerous at night, but he went anyway.

"At one or two in the morning we heard a big explosion and I saw fire coming form the sky. My cousin's wife came running, she said go look for your cousin, but I waited until I had finished my dawn prayers, no one could eat anything.

"I arrived there and I saw dead bodies, some were in the middle of the river, I walked around looking for him and his son but I couldn't find him. I went back home and his wife asked me did you see him, is he dead, where is he? I said I couldn't find him. She was wailing and crying.

"I went again looking for him. There was light now, I picked through the bodies, the Arbabs [village elders] were distributing the flesh, but I didn't go there. I looked through the ground and I could only see his two feet and his son's feet. I recognised them because he and his son had henna on their toes."

Islamu-ldin, a 20-year-old from Issa khail village with tufts of hair sprouting from his cheek, took his turn to speak. He said he ran for three hours to get to the riverbed to look for his brother.

"Our village is far from the river, I searched a lot through the dead, and I found my brother. I recognized him from his clothes. But we only found his upper body, maybe someone took the legs, maybe it just burned to ashes."

Omar Khan was weeping openly now. A few other men resisted, but their eyes were as red as those of Jan Muhamad, who was babbling and shouting at the young Assadullah again and again.

Saleh Muhamad, a 25-year-old man with thick beard, wanted to get some fuel but no one would give him a lift. His brother and brother-in-law went and he went to sleep, then he heard the explosion. "I waited till darkness ended, then went there. I didn't find anyone I knew, so I waited for the elders. They gave me two bodies, they looked like my relatives and I came back with them."

Another village elder said that at least a dozen of the dead were from the Taliban. Although most of them had already left when the explosion happened, the rest stayed trying to keep some order while the villagers shoved and pushed.

"At midnight my brother and nephew went to get fuel. I also wanted to go but I didn't have a car," said Saleh Muhamad.

"At one in the morning I went to bed. When I heard the explosion I called my brother but his phone was off … when I arrived at 3am there were dead everywhereI was searching for my brother and nephew but I couldn't find anyone.

"I had a torch with me and I could see well, but I still couldn't recognise anyone." His eyes looked straight through me as he said: "I found one body and took it home and we buried it. It was a full body, with arms and legs. We buried it well."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/sep/11/afghanistan-airstrike-vict ims-stories

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only one in six believes Afghan conflict is worth British soldiers' lives as Miliband admits election they died for was 'not free'
By Tim Shipman and Rebecca English
Last updated at 12:05 AM on 12th September 2009
Support for the war in Afghanistan has plunged to a new low, according to a poll.
It was released yesterday as Foreign Secretary David Miliband conceded that the Afghan election, which ten British soldiers died safeguarding, was riddled with fraud.
Only 17 per cent - one in six people - believes both that the mission in Afghanistan is making people safer and that it is worth the lives of British servicemen and women, the Populus survey found.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1212848/Only-believes-Afghan-c onflict-worth-British-soldiers-lives.html#ixzz0QwGt7STo

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
TonyGosling
Editor
Editor


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 16751
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2009 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Japan ready to withdraw support for Afghanistan war
Richard Lloyd Parry in Tokyo
September 16, 2009
The Times
Yukio Hatoyama's choice of Defence Minister suggests that he will keep an election pledge to withdraw from the Afghanistan campaign
Japan’s new Defence Minister is a strong opponent of the country’s military support for the US, making it more likely than ever that the Government of Yukio Hatoyama will withdraw its naval ships from the war in Afghanistan early next year..........
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article6836939.ece

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
outsider
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter
Trustworthy Freedom Fighter


Joined: 30 Jul 2006
Posts: 5881
Location: East London

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

US preparing for massive increase in troops to Afghanistan:

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=15364

_________________
'And he (the devil) said to him: To thee will I give all this power, and the glory of them; for to me they are delivered, and to whom I will, I give them'. Luke IV 5-7.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    9/11, 7/7 & the War on Freedom Forum Index -> General All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Page 2 of 7

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group