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King Jacob Rothschild's Family Fortune: way above Rich List
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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 20, 2019 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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The Rothschild Gang: Shadow Conspiracy Or Rumor?
Economy Watch Jun. 1, 2011, 4:55 AM
https://www.businessinsider.com/the-rothschild-gang-shadow-conspiracy- or-rumor-2011-6

The Rothschilds are the most famous banking family in history. In the 19 th century they lent money to Kings and governments and funded both sides in the Napoleonic wars. They once saved the Bank of England from collapse with their own money. But how did they come to be so fabulously wealthy? In this two-part feature we first look at their rise from the ghettoes of Frankfurt, and then in part two we ask why they have been accused of everything from deliberately starting wars, to assassinating presidents and controlling the entire global financial system.

In The World's Richest Family - You Didn't Know About (Part 1) EconomyWatch journalist David Smith finds out how the Rothschilds came to be:

From their five European bases, the Rothschilds became masters of the political universe. They lent money to Kings, including England's George IV, dined with Prime Ministers like Disraeli and Gladstone, funded the creation of a pan-European rail network and financed wars, including both sides in the Napoleonic Wars.

Their status was put most eloquently by the contemporary newspaper Nile's Weekly Register in 1835:

"The Rothschilds are the wonders of modern banking...peering above kings, rising higher than emperors, and holding a whole continent in the hollow of their hands....not a cabinet moves without their advice."
Of Baron Nathan Rosthchild, the head of the English branch, the newspaper said:

"He holds the keys to peace or war. They are the brokers and counselors of the Kings of Europe and of the Republican chiefs of America. What more can they desire?"
The Rothschilds didn't just lend money to royals, they also behaved like royalty by marrying each other constantly. In 1836 Nathan's son Lionel married his first cousin Charlotte Rothschild, who was herself the daughter of Nathan's brother James, who had married his niece. In other words, her father was also her great uncle. Of Nathan's seven children, four married Rothschild first cousins. Such inbreeding was genetically questionable, but it bred loyalty and kept money safely in the family.

The Rothschilds ability to form symbiotic links with the powerful became notorious.

Read the rest of The World's Richest Family - You Didn't Know About (Part 1) on EconomyWatch.

In The World's Richest Family - You Didn't Know About (Part 2), David Smith investigates the veil of conspiracy surrounding the Rothschilds:

We can trace the roots of this antipathy as far back as the 19 th century when the Rothschilds were the supreme financiers of the world. At that time, the family was already being accused of financing wars for their own financial gain. The German writer Friedrich von Scherb wrote in his 1893 history of the family that:

"The house of Rothschild has arisen from the quarrels between states, has become great and mighty from wars. The misfortune of states and peoples has been its fortune."
This view that wars could not be fought without the support of Rothschild finance was shared by the left-wing English writer JA Hobson, who wrote in his book Imperialism: A Study (1902) that the Boer Wars had been funded by a small group of Jewish-German financiers, principally the Rothschilds, for economic gain.

"Does anyone seriously suppose that a great war could be undertaken by any European state, or a great state loan subscribed if the house of Rothschild and their connections set their face against it?" he wrote.
These accusations that the Rothschilds were unscrupulous, even amoral, financiers may not shock us too much today. But the claims made against them began to take on a more anti-Semitic flavor in Germany after the 1 st World War.

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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 22, 2019 1:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rothschilds financed Munich-based pan-European union- still very strong to this day - Hapsburgs still in charge!
According to his autobiography, at the beginning of 1924 his friend Baron Louis de Rothschild introduced him to Max Warburg who offered to finance his movement for the next three years by giving him 60,000 gold marks. Warburg remained sincerely interested in the movement for the remainder of his life and served as an intermediate for Coudenhove-Kalergi with influential Americans such as banker Paul Warburg and financier Bernard Baruch. In April 1924, Coudenhove-Kalergi founded the journal Paneuropa (1924–1938) of which he was editor and principal author. The next year he started publishing his main work, the Kampf um Paneuropa (The fight for Paneuropa, 1925–1928, three volumes). In 1926, the first Congress of the Pan-European Union was held in Vienna and the 2,000 delegates elected Coudenhove-Kalergi as president of the Central Council, a position he held until his death in 1972.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_von_Coudenhove-Kalergi#Pan-Europ ean_political_activist

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www.rethink911.org
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www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Q&A with Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson talked about his book, The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook, on the power of social networks throughout history and their influence in the present.

The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook

Link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgKhsq7FQQw
March 14 2018
Niall Ferguson and Brian Lamb for CSPAN


The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook,





Niall Ferguson
It's the kind of genre that looks like history, and usually involves some historical narrative, but it's nearly always detached from any scholarship. There's fake history as well as fake news. And most conspiracy theory history is fake history.

00:02:22
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
This makes it very difficult for the professional historian to write about these subjects. I mean, who wants to write about the Illuminati if most that is already out there is crazy stuff.

00:02:34
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
And who wants to really talk about the Freemasons of the American Revolution? If you write about that, won't you just find yourself on the same shelf in the bookshop as the crazy books?

00:02:46
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, I've noticed over my career, that these actually quite interesting and important subjects have been abandoned by professional historians and left to the cranks and the conspiracy theorists.

00:02:59
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
And that's a pity because there are stories to be told about all of them; about the Illuminati, about the Rothschild's, you name it, there is some history there, but it's just very different history from the conspiracy theories.

00:03:13
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
And part of the point of "The Square and the Tower" is to say, we should be able to talk about these subjects without being classified with the cranks and the conspiracy theorists.

00:03:24
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
Before we get too far into the book, let's catch up about you. I mean, you're well known in some circles in this country, for things like "The Ascent of Money", PBS series – documentary series. What was that, and when did you do it?

00:03:38
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Ten years ago, I published a book and produced a television series called, "The Ascent of Money", a financial history of the world. And this series was designed to give people some historical context for the crisis that I saw coming.

00:04:02
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, 2006, '07 I was writing quite a lot about the coming financial crisis. What struck me when I would spend time on Wall Street was that the people who were running the investment banks knew no financial history beyond their own careers. They certainly weren't prepared for a financial crisis on the scale of 1929, which was what they got with the failure of Lehman Brothers.

00:04:24
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, I'm a great believer that historians can help us with the present and even with the futures that we contemplate. What I tried to do in "The Ascent of Money" was to say, look here, Wall Street, the chances are very high that a major financial crisis will happen. That's what history leads us to expect.

00:04:35
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
What can we learn about the financial system from history? I don't really understand anything until I know it's history. That's how I operate.

00:04:41
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, I wanted to tell this story of money, where do banks come from, what's the bull market, what's the stock market? Why do we buy houses with loans called mortgages? So, I wrote a book that essentially gave the reader a sense of where the financial system came from and why it was very likely to suffer a major crisis.

00:04:59
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
The crisis happened just after the book came out. I think Lehman went bust just a few weeks after the publication of the book, which was interesting, and meant that I had at least something to say about what was happening in real time as financial history was being made.

00:05:14
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Ten years later, this book is trying to do something similar for Silicon Valley; that is to say, I'm saying to Silicon Valley, history applies to you. History didn't begin with the Google IPO or the founding of Facebook. History goes a long way back and it's relevant to you.

00:05:32
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
But I'm also saying to readers interested in history, network science is pretty important, and historians need to understand it. And if you don't really understand how networks work, you will not only fail to understand the present, but you'll actually have some trouble understanding the past.

00:05:45
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, it's a bit like "The Ascent of Money" goes to Silicon Valley. That's a rough characterization of this book. And any of your viewers who enjoyed "The Ascent of Money", will I hope, enjoy this book.

00:05:54
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
Where did you grow up?

00:05:55
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
In Glasgow, in Scotland. You can tell from my odd accent that I'm from the British Isles, but I actually come from that peculiar part of the British Isles; Scotland, which is one of those countries with a superiority complex, rather than an inferiority complex.

00:06:07
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Most small countries have an inferiority complex. But the Scots have long thought that they invented the modern world, that they run the United Kingdom, and that where ever they go they will find traces of their forefathers' endeavors, including the United States with its many traces of Scottish influence. But that's where I grew up and I was encouraged to think that Scotland had a special mission to transform the world.

00:06:46
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
And what were your parents doing?

00:06:49
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
My father was a doctor. My mother, now retired, was a physicist who taught physics. So, I come from a relatively scientific family. My sister is a professor of physics at Yale. She's the clever one.

00:07:07
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
I was the black sheep of the family in that I drifted into what some people think of as a social science and others think of as one of the humanities; history. So, I study the change particles called human beings, and the way in which they behave.

00:07:29
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
But I think my – my family gave me a couple of advantages; at least two. And one was a tendency to think about the world with the framework of the Scottish Enlightenment. Through my grandfathers' I was the heir of a certain intellectual legacy that goes back to Adam Smith and David Hume, and the great thinkers of 18th century Scotland.

00:07:59
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
And I think the other advantage that they gave me was to think of history as a branch of literature. So, there were history books in the house, but side by side with the great books of fiction. And so, I was introduced at an early stage to the idea that above all, history must be literature. It must be readable.

00:08:16
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
A. J. P. Taylor was a historian that I remember occupying some space on my parents' bookshelves. And that inspired me to find history attractive as an intellectual endeavor, but also as a literary endeavor.

00:08:27
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
Your college education; how extensive was it and where was it?

00:08:32
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Well extensive is a funny word to use because in some ways an Oxford education is intensive. One reads history. I spent three years as an undergraduate at Oxford reading history.

00:08:48
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
That was a wonderful opportunity. I had grown up in Glasgow. To me, Oxford was nirvana; a kind of promised land of not only stunning architecture, but also brilliant minds.

00:09:02
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
I couldn't believe that it was possible to be employed to sit in a book lined study and divide one's time between reading books, writing books, and talking about books with students.

00:09:18
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
These Oxford dons – we would call them professors in the United States, seemed to me the luckiest human beings alive. And all I wanted to do once I saw their lifestyle, was to have it myself, to have a lifetime spent in this realm of books.

00:09:35
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
It was very inspiring to be at Oxford in the early 1980's for another reason. Britain was in a great state of fervent. Margaret Thatcher was prime minister. Most universities lent in the direction of the left.

00:09:50
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
To be pro-factual was to be in a minority. We were – I became one of these young Thatcherites. We were a feisty minority who enjoyed making the case for the Thatcher government.

00:10:03
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, I had a certain political education at Oxford, as well as an academic education. And Oxford being Oxford, unlike American universities, there's only one exam. It's at the end; finals. Everything hinges on that.

00:10:18
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
What you do in the proceeding years is kind of up to you. I didn't go to many lectures. In fact, I went to hardly any lectures. I did learn to play the double bass. I dabbled in student journalism. I found that I couldn't act.

00:10:34
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
I tried pretty much everything except sport and found that I wasn't really that good at any of the things other than writing history essays so that the final -- in the final phase in final year, I reverted back to being a historian just in time.

00:10:51
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
When you're talking about networks in your book, Oxford is a network, Magdalen College, I would assume is a network.

00:10:59
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Absolutely.

00:11:01
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
There are some 35 colleges are more at Oxford. What does it mean for you that you were at Magdalen College inside Oxford as far as networking?

00:11:11
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Absolutely. To go to Oxford and to go to one of the most prestigious -- the most prestigious college, Magdalen, is to be admitted into the network of the British elite.

00:11:23
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Right there, the contemporaries that you meet will include future leaders, will include future editor, there’s a sense in which Britain is still, as it has been for centuries, run by people who went to Oxford and Cambridge.

00:11:39
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
You go to the Oxford Union which is the debating society, what you're really seeing is students preparing for the House of Commons, practicing, getting the hang of standing at the dispatch box. And some my near (ph) contemporaries of gone to great things.

00:11:57
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Rather to my own incredulity, Boris Johnson is now the foreign secretary. That's not something I would have predicted back then, it's probably something that he would've predicted.

00:12:11
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, I think Oxford admits you to the network that is sometimes called the establishment, that still to a surprising extent runs Britain. I didn't really appreciate that at the time I think.

00:12:25
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
I only retrospectively appreciate the extent to which that was admission into a very important network that extends into politics, that extends into the media, and that extends into business.

00:12:39
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
And the -- from that point onwards, in your life without even necessarily being aware of it, when you meet somebody at a cocktail party in London, a transaction occurs which goes like this, oh, did you go to Oxford?

00:12:55
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Oh, which college? When were you there? Do you know X? Oh, yes, I know Y. Now people who haven't been admitted to that network can’t play that game.

00:13:06
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
It's the central activity of social networks, exchanging information and building a connection that then has utility in the present. Because of course if you and I went to Magdalen, we have a set of common experiences and that builds a kind of trust.

00:13:26
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, the chances are that any future transaction that we embark on or project that we decide to do together that will be based on that underlying mutual understanding. That’s how social networks work and Oxford introduced me to that world.

00:13:45
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
In your book, you talk about Oxford and how it relates to Cambridge. I want to get back to this in a second. I want you to tell us about the apostles.

00:13:56
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Yes.

00:13:57
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
But after you graduated and came to this country, how many different places have you taught in the United States?

00:14:06
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
I first taught at New York University for a couple of years and then went to Harvard. And I was professor at Harvard for 12 years and only recently moved to Stanford, so three. I’ve given multiple guest lectures here, there and everywhere, but those three institutions of the ones where I've spent time.

00:14:29
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
So who are or were or can be an apostle and what are they?

00:14:33
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
Cambridge had a very remarkable institution that doesn't really have equivalence anywhere else. The Cambridge apostles were -- are because it still exists a society of extreme intellectual exclusivity.

00:14:49
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
It dates back to the 19th century. It was an intellectual discussion society. Members would meet, give papers, be brilliant, eat sardines on toast. That's about it. Doesn't sound like much, does it?

00:15:04
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
But it was really and remains one of the most prestigious societies that one could be elected to. And the process of election was an arduous one. Only rarely were elections made. So, the apostles remained relatively few in number.

00:15:22
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
It was probably the height of its intellectual influence in the 1910s and 1920s, when John Maynard Keynes, certainly the most influential economist of the 20th century was a member, along with his friend Lytton Strachey, one of the great iconoclastic writers of that generation.

00:15:47
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
And they look down from a great height on everybody else. They regard himself, not without some cause as very clever indeed.

00:15:58
Brian Lamb
Brian Lamb
You’re write, they were in a word insufferable.

00:16:03
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
They were pretty insufferable actually. Reading the younger Keynes's correspondence of the subject makes you realize that a very exclusive network has a kind of nasty side to it. It was quite misogynistic.

00:16:22
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
The apostles of the early 1900s, certainly tended gay, nothing wrong with that. But the kind of misogyny that kept -- accompanied that particular chapter in Cambridge history doesn't look well today. But they were primarily an intellectual group.

00:16:44
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
One interesting consequence of their elitism and that's the only word for it was a disdain for all the conventional wisdom that Britain had inherited from the Victorians. So, if you are the crème de la crème intellectually, naturally, you're far too clever to believe in free trade, or gold stand or any of the things of that the Victorians believed in. The British Empire.

00:17:03
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
So, the interesting about the apostles was that by the 1920s they were questioning most of the conventional wisdom of the previous generation. But what then happens, and this is really why I write about the apostles in the book, was something surprising, they got hacked by the Russians. Sounds rather like a contemporary problem, there’s nothing new under the sun.

00:17:22
Niall Ferguson
Niall Ferguson
The Soviet intelligence agency, the KGB had a very ingenious strategy in the 1930s and that ingenious strategy was to try to recruit agents, operatives from within the commanding heights of the English establishment.

_________________
www.lawyerscommitteefor9-11inquiry.org
www.rethink911.org
www.patriotsquestion911.com
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
https://37.220.108.147/members/www.bilderberg.org/phpBB2/
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